Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 
BlueShift
1632 posts

Uber Geek


  #963978 9-Jan-2014 16:36
Send private message

So, I've put brew #8 down to ferment, and brew #7 has been in the bottle just about long enough for a taste test. I've been trying various different kits, I haven't made the same brew twice yet, but I'm starting to develop some favourites which are likely to get a second visit soon.

The wifey bought me an airstill for xmas - the wee benchtop sized pot still I mentioned in an earlier post on this thread. I've fermented, distilled, filtered and flavoured one batch so far, and have a litre of bourbon, a litre of Irish Cream and a further 500ml of spirit I haven't done anything with yet. The bourbon tastes bourbonny, and is quite acceptable mixed with coke. The Irish cream has a high WAF. I have my second batch of wash just finishing fermentation now, I'll probably clarify it tonight and distill tomorrow. I'm pretty happy with the results, it works out at maybe $10 for 2 litres of spirit. I'll have to find someone local with a full-size reflux still and try a taste test to compare flavours at some point.

Affiliate link
 
 
 

Affiliate link: Trade NZ and US shares and funds with Sharesies.
andrewNZ
2487 posts

Uber Geek
Inactive user


  #963986 9-Jan-2014 17:09
Send private message

BlueShift: So, I've put brew #8 down to ferment, and brew #7 has been in the bottle just about long enough for a taste test. I've been trying various different kits, I haven't made the same brew twice yet, but I'm starting to develop some favourites which are likely to get a second visit soon.

The wifey bought me an airstill for xmas - the wee benchtop sized pot still I mentioned in an earlier post on this thread. I've fermented, distilled, filtered and flavoured one batch so far, and have a litre of bourbon, a litre of Irish Cream and a further 500ml of spirit I haven't done anything with yet. The bourbon tastes bourbonny, and is quite acceptable mixed with coke. The Irish cream has a high WAF. I have my second batch of wash just finishing fermentation now, I'll probably clarify it tonight and distill tomorrow. I'm pretty happy with the results, it works out at maybe $10 for 2 litres of spirit. I'll have to find someone local with a full-size reflux still and try a taste test to compare flavours at some point.


All spirits will mellow with time

The cream liqueurs I've done (Still Spirits Irish/chocolate cream) taste MUCH better after sitting for 6+ months. I just rediscovered a 5l jug of it last night, its 2 years old and it is so very smooth.

I find Whiskys normally tastes loads better if I oak the spirit first. 

andrewNZ
2487 posts

Uber Geek
Inactive user


  #964001 9-Jan-2014 17:36
Send private message

BTR: I have done 3 lot of home brew now (That all tasted horrible) and haven't broken a single can opener doing so.


Although I don't drink beer (spirits for me), the missus and friends say I haven't made a bad brew yet. I used to muck around a lot trying to do it by the book. Now I have a method that works perfectly and requires minimal effort.

Some good pointers to getting a good end product
- Start with a good kit. If Lager is your thing, then Black Rock is good, as is Muntons and all others around that price I've tried. The Coopers European lager also produces an acceptable brew.
- Buy additional malt extract from the supermarket, it gives the end product body (it changes the taste a bit too)
- Don't rush it. 

My process is as follows
1. Clean and sterilise (obviously)
2. Make the wort with 1 brew can of brew extract, 1/2 packet of brew enhancer (fructose mix), 1/2 a big can of malt extract. I do 2 barrels at a time for obvious reasons.
3. Brew it till the airlock stops bubbling totally then wait till the weekend. I often press on the lid to make the airlock level so I'm sure. This has taken up to 4 weeks in cold weather and I've left one 6-8 weeks when I wrecked myself with no effect on the end product.
4. Bottle and leave for 4 weeks minimum in warm weather, 6 in cold weather. If you can wait 8-10 weeks, it'll be much better. I use priming drops because they're easy 1 for a stubbie, 2 for a biggie.
5. Open them cold and decant into a jug (unless you're my creep partner, and don't mind the sediment in your warm beer)

I don't mess with hydrometers unless I change something significantly and only to calculate alc/vol, the brewing is done when it's done.



andrewNZ
2487 posts

Uber Geek
Inactive user


  #964033 9-Jan-2014 18:37
Send private message

jpoc:
andrewNZ:
jpoc: I have one currently unresolved technical issue. Opening the big cans of malt extract - like the Coopers ones that you can get in Pak'nSave. I find that opening these big cans breaks can openers. It does not matter what I choose. Cheapies from the two dollar shop, basic ones from the supermarkets or the warehouse or the high end fancy ones with gears and everything. All of them die after I have opened half a dozen cans.

Am I doing something wrong or do the rest of you guys have this problem? Has anyone found an opener that just lasts and lasts on these cans?


Not to be rude, but it sounds like you're doing it wrong.

I've been using the same opener for years without any trouble at all. What exactly happens to the openers?


You could be right but I don't see what I am doing wrong. If I use a fancy opener with gears then the teeth no longer mesh together so turning the handle has no effect.

If I use the cheapie ones then the wheel seems to lose the ability to grip on the can and turn it round.

I have bought one of those openers that cuts the side of the can rather than the top, I will see how I get on.


Once again, not trying to be rude. Some of this may seem a little insulting, but sometimes you just have to cover all the bases.

I don't find malt cans any harder than normal cans to open.

You have to leave the can sitting on the bench and kind of let the opener turn it. I see some people opening cans in mid air, but I don't think that's going to do the opener any good even with a small can.

Also I find that I need to hold the handles down a little tiny bit so the gripping wheel doesn't ride up the lip of the can. If it keeps climbing off it'll wreck itself pretty fast. You should be able to cut the whole lid in one go fairly quickly and easily if you hold it just right

jpoc
1034 posts

Uber Geek


  #964097 9-Jan-2014 20:03
Send private message

BTR:
jpoc:
andrewNZ:
jpoc: I have one currently unresolved technical issue. Opening the big cans of malt extract - like the Coopers ones that you can get in Pak'nSave. I find that opening these big cans breaks can openers. It does not matter what I choose. Cheapies from the two dollar shop, basic ones from the supermarkets or the warehouse or the high end fancy ones with gears and everything. All of them die after I have opened half a dozen cans.

Am I doing something wrong or do the rest of you guys have this problem? Has anyone found an opener that just lasts and lasts on these cans?


Not to be rude, but it sounds like you're doing it wrong.

I've been using the same opener for years without any trouble at all. What exactly happens to the openers?


You could be right but I don't see what I am doing wrong. If I use a fancy opener with gears then the teeth no longer mesh together so turning the handle has no effect.

If I use the cheapie ones then the wheel seems to lose the ability to grip on the can and turn it round.

I have bought one of those openers that cuts the side of the can rather than the top, I will see how I get on.





Just wanted to check you are opening the right end of the can aren't you. One end is designed to be opened and the other isn't.....


I have done 3 lot of home brew now (That all tasted horrible) and haven't broken a single can opener doing so.


Yes, always opening at the correct end.

jpoc
1034 posts

Uber Geek


  #964099 9-Jan-2014 20:04
Send private message

andrewNZ:
jpoc:
andrewNZ:
jpoc: I have one currently unresolved technical issue. Opening the big cans of malt extract - like the Coopers ones that you can get in Pak'nSave. I find that opening these big cans breaks can openers. It does not matter what I choose. Cheapies from the two dollar shop, basic ones from the supermarkets or the warehouse or the high end fancy ones with gears and everything. All of them die after I have opened half a dozen cans.

Am I doing something wrong or do the rest of you guys have this problem? Has anyone found an opener that just lasts and lasts on these cans?


Not to be rude, but it sounds like you're doing it wrong.

I've been using the same opener for years without any trouble at all. What exactly happens to the openers?


You could be right but I don't see what I am doing wrong. If I use a fancy opener with gears then the teeth no longer mesh together so turning the handle has no effect.

If I use the cheapie ones then the wheel seems to lose the ability to grip on the can and turn it round.

I have bought one of those openers that cuts the side of the can rather than the top, I will see how I get on.


Once again, not trying to be rude. Some of this may seem a little insulting, but sometimes you just have to cover all the bases.

I don't find malt cans any harder than normal cans to open.

You have to leave the can sitting on the bench and kind of let the opener turn it. I see some people opening cans in mid air, but I don't think that's going to do the opener any good even with a small can.

Also I find that I need to hold the handles down a little tiny bit so the gripping wheel doesn't ride up the lip of the can. If it keeps climbing off it'll wreck itself pretty fast. You should be able to cut the whole lid in one go fairly quickly and easily if you hold it just right


Yes, can always on the bench. I think that you would have to be insane to open such a large can in the air. You would also need very strong wrists.

Never had a problem with the wheel riding up.

JonnyCam
611 posts

Ultimate Geek

ID Verified

  #970316 20-Jan-2014 21:37
Send private message

I finally got my kettle drilled out and installed a ball valve in. (35 litre pot)


I'm going down the BIAB path, with no chill (at least until I can buy an immersion chiller)
Have done about 10 kit, kit + extract & grains brews so far.
Just don't like having that 'kit taste' in the back end.

Best investment I made was a $50 fridge, and a $40 temp controller which turns the fridge or heating pad on to maintain set temp. Was great for fermentation, and for cold crashing / lagering my beer.

Anyone else here doing biab?




Rustee75
32 posts

Geek


  #976015 28-Jan-2014 16:12
Send private message

Cider update : Grabbed some Mangrove Jacks Craft Series Wildberry flavour,  mainly because that was the only brand available in my little hick town :)
Brewed up easily, and left it for 2 weeks in the bottle. Yeah, it tastes good ! Hasnt got the fizz quite like the stuff at the shop but I'm pretty pleased with it. Good change from beer and the missus seems suitably impressed by it.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic





News and reviews »

Belkin Screenforce Tempered Glass Screen Protector and Bumper - Apple Watch
Posted 15-Aug-2022 17:20


Samsung Introducing Galaxy Z Flip4 and Galaxy Z Fold4
Posted 11-Aug-2022 01:00


Samsung Unveils Health Innovations with Galaxy Watch5 and Galaxy Watch5 Pro
Posted 11-Aug-2022 01:00


Google Bringing First Cloud Region to Aotearoa New Zealand
Posted 10-Aug-2022 08:51


ANZ To Move to FIS Modern Banking Platform
Posted 10-Aug-2022 08:28


GoPro Hero10 Black Review
Posted 8-Aug-2022 17:41


Amazon to Acquire iRobot
Posted 6-Aug-2022 11:41


Samsung x LIFE Picture Collection Brings Iconic Moments in History to The Frame
Posted 4-Aug-2022 17:04


Norton Consumer Cyber Safety Pulse Report: Phishing for New Bait on Social Media
Posted 4-Aug-2022 16:50


Microsoft Announces New Solutions for Threat Intelligence and Attack Surface Management
Posted 3-Aug-2022 21:54


Seagate Addresses Hyperscale Workloads with Enterprise-Class Nytro SSDs
Posted 3-Aug-2022 21:50


Visa Launching Eco-friendly Payment Solutions in New Zealand
Posted 3-Aug-2022 21:48


NCR Delivers Services to Run Bank of New Zealand ATM Network
Posted 30-Jul-2022 11:06


New HP Portfolio Supports New Era of Hybrid Work
Posted 28-Jul-2022 17:14


Harman Kardon Launches Citation MultiBeam 1100 Soundbar
Posted 28-Jul-2022 17:10









Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.







Backblaze unlimited backup