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  Reply # 1729657 3-Mar-2017 22:34
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About time too, they really need to get the OS on hardware if they ever want to have a chance..




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  Reply # 1729669 3-Mar-2017 22:45
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AHitman:

 

About time too, they really need to get the OS on hardware if they ever want to have a chance..

 

 

Jolla have announced partnerships with several parties other than Sony, which will see much wider use of the OS.





Sony Xperia X running Sailfish OS. https://sailfishos.org The true independent open source mobile OS 
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  Reply # 1729787 4-Mar-2017 11:09
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Does it have an inbuilt file manager which interfaces well with other network devices such as NAS' or is a third party manager required?



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  Reply # 1730126 4-Mar-2017 21:54
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Dratsab: Does it have an inbuilt file manager which interfaces well with other network devices such as NAS' or is a third party manager required?

 

It has it's own inbuilt file manager but it doesn't currently interface with other devices. The OS is being continually updated so the access to external devices may well be added in time. Jolla have a forum where users can suggest features/improvements and the ones with the most votes usually get incorporated.

 

There are also third party file managers. There's a very active developer community with new apps being listed all the time.

 

There's the official Jolla App Store and there's the Warehouse where there's a whole host of Sailfish apps, generally from GitHub. 

 

The device runs a compatibility layer that runs Android apps. Options to use Yandex and Aptoid come preinstalled and are available if/when you enable the Android compatibility layer. You can also side load other apps using an app like Send Anywhere. I've got Android apps from the Google Play Store via another device this way.

 

If there's an Android file manager that does what you need then it'll most likely work on a Sailfish device.

 

The only Android apps that don't run properly or at all are any that require Google Play Services.  So far there's been no show stoppers for me.





Sony Xperia X running Sailfish OS. https://sailfishos.org The true independent open source mobile OS 
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Nokia N1
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  Reply # 1730230 5-Mar-2017 09:21
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For me on android Tasker is a must, and I miss features that became impossible post kitkat, like programatically toggling mobile data or setting/unsetting pin with a single button.

So, how automatible is SailFish? Can I build my own interfaces and macros/shortcuts? And can I do it with a reasonible UI, or would I have to learn a programming language? And unlike tasker would this be built in, so background permission etc changes don't break it?

I do like some of the mentioned features, but without these I'd be more inclined to keep what little control I have with android.



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  Reply # 1730265 5-Mar-2017 09:50
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PaulBags: For me on android Tasker is a must, and I miss features that became impossible post kitkat, like programatically toggling mobile data or setting/unsetting pin with a single button.

So, how automatible is SailFish? Can I build my own interfaces and macros/shortcuts? And can I do it with a reasonible UI, or would I have to learn a programming language? And unlike tasker would this be built in, so background permission etc changes don't break it?

I do like some of the mentioned features, but without these I'd be more inclined to keep what little control I have with android.

 

Tasker will run on Sailfish using the Android compatibility layer called Android support.  You switch this option on in the Settings area. Tasker is in the Aptiode Store.

 

There is a native app called Situations which has similar functions to Tasker.

 

I'm not sure what interfaces and macros you have built with Android nor how you built them. I assume you have used some sort of programming language. Being Linux based there is plenty of stuff around that can be utilised with Sailfish. There's a Sailfish SDK and tutorials. https://sailfishos.org/develop/sdk-overview/ 





Sony Xperia X running Sailfish OS. https://sailfishos.org The true independent open source mobile OS 
Samsung Galaxy Tab S3
Nokia N1
Dell Inspiron 14z i5


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  Reply # 1730602 5-Mar-2017 23:15
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Technofreak:

PaulBags: For me on android Tasker is a must, and I miss features that became impossible post kitkat, like programatically toggling mobile data or setting/unsetting pin with a single button.

So, how automatible is SailFish? Can I build my own interfaces and macros/shortcuts? And can I do it with a reasonible UI, or would I have to learn a programming language? And unlike tasker would this be built in, so background permission etc changes don't break it?

I do like some of the mentioned features, but without these I'd be more inclined to keep what little control I have with android.


Tasker will run on Sailfish using the Android compatibility layer called Android support.  You switch this option on in the Settings area. Tasker is in the Aptiode Store.


There is a native app called Situations which has similar functions to Tasker.


I'm not sure what interfaces and macros you have built with Android nor how you built them. I assume you have used some sort of programming language. Being Linux based there is plenty of stuff around that can be utilised with Sailfish. There's a Sailfish SDK and tutorials. https://sailfishos.org/develop/sdk-overview/ 


Tasker has a GUI mode capable of creating apps & overlays without any specific programming knowledge.

One I use has buttons for shortcuts, to send postdata (to eventghost on windows), activate tasker profiles, a drop down for volume profiles (making my own in tasker allows me to set some sounds silent only while the screen is off); and a second tab for wifi info & buttons to connect to different APs in my house (they don't switch well with or without tasker).

Another, exported as a stand alone app, has four tabs: buttons to send postdata to MPCs webserver which allows me to control it from my phone, the web file browser of MPC, status info (remaining time), and buttons to close/run MPC (via eventghost).

Then there's the alarms I have set up in tasker: 'get up', 'leave for work', 'lunch', & 'second break'. Since I work a roster these only trigger if there isn't a calender event in local calender "off" - makes them easy & automatic to set, and as a bonus if I call in sick I just set 'sick' in my calender & all my alarms are inactive. Leave for work disables wifi, it used to enable mobile data too but it can't post kitkat - when it could I had the bus real time info load, so I had faster access to it on the way out the door. This interaction with the local calenders is built into tasker, no programming required.

Tasker also manages sounds for txts, with notifications in messages set to silent. Tasker only does anything if the sender is on my contacts, this way services that are not-a-number can be muted. I don't have to care when I get txt about usage or the latest promo. Text sounds from very important people repeat every N minutes - I sometimes charge my phone in a room I'm not in, and may forget to check it. I have a pop up window with a preview of the txt, probably not useful on later androids but still useful to me on lollipop.

I've set "swipe up from home" to an overlay showing battery percent, time, date, the next four days whether I'm on or off work, as well as what features are turned on (gps etc) - followed by turning the screen off. Useful information in an easy to read format as I'm putting my phone away - inspired mostly so I'd be more likely to see the time & so could pretend that's why I had my phone out when I was supposed to be working :p.

My phones screen comes on when ringing, I can't disable it and it's far too easy to pocket answer/decline. So on ring I have a blocking overlay that disappears when you swipe it down. Problem gone.

In kitkat I could also disable mobile data when I connected to wifi at home, also I could set/remove PIN. The latter was useful for charging my phone at work when I couldn't keep an eye on it, was much faster than going all through settings and choosing the same PIN every time.

Probably the hardest part of all of this was figuring out how to send postdata in a proper format, so much can be done in taskers GUI. I may be using some copy/pasted script somewhere, but if I am I can't find them.

Phew, I feel like I've just given you my lifes story. Sorry. I'd like to think half of this would be available by default in an OS and/or the OS would have better UI that didn't need hacks.

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