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  Reply # 1216818 18-Jan-2015 09:19
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Computer game = soccer ball
Cinema = planet earth.
My house, more like cinema than computer game

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  Reply # 1216846 18-Jan-2015 10:25
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joker97: HDR refers to how an image is processed to make the very bright objects not so bright and very dark objects not so dark; so these pixels fit into a shade of pixel that gives a colour [there are only so many colours a jpg, a video file can store, within a fixed spectrum). once an image is burnt onto bluray i cannot ssee how a TV can recover these details. usually people processing HDR add oddles of colour saturation to top it off.

unless of course in TV HDR refers to making everything more vivid. if that's the case they will turn up the saturation and make badly encoded media very coloured!

or .. umm ... contrast ratio is a good start. but it won't recover any lost dynamic range in the encoding ... and contrast ratio is pretty good already ... and there are only (correct me if wrong) 255 shades of contrast in video encoding and you cannot improve on that however high dynamic a TV's range is. unless it paints its own shades


Ok, so it's another marketing term for image processing. There have been all sorts of hardware/software gadgets over the years marketed in TVs to enhance the video signal in some way or other. This is the latest.




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  Reply # 1218267 20-Jan-2015 13:14
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DarthKermit:
joker97: HDR refers to how an image is processed to make the very bright objects not so bright and very dark objects not so dark; so these pixels fit into a shade of pixel that gives a colour [there are only so many colours a jpg, a video file can store, within a fixed spectrum). once an image is burnt onto bluray i cannot ssee how a TV can recover these details. usually people processing HDR add oddles of colour saturation to top it off.

unless of course in TV HDR refers to making everything more vivid. if that's the case they will turn up the saturation and make badly encoded media very coloured!

or .. umm ... contrast ratio is a good start. but it won't recover any lost dynamic range in the encoding ... and contrast ratio is pretty good already ... and there are only (correct me if wrong) 255 shades of contrast in video encoding and you cannot improve on that however high dynamic a TV's range is. unless it paints its own shades


Ok, so it's another marketing term for image processing. There have been all sorts of hardware/software gadgets over the years marketed in TVs to enhance the video signal in some way or other. This is the latest.


Arrrgh hate some of those gadgets, especially intelligent frame rate creation, I turn off all that guff on my TVs and use the best calibration device next to colour meter...my eyes.

Quite a few articles online and readily downloadable test patterns for calibrating brightness, contrast, sharpness, R,G,B levels, White levels. etc.

Unfortunately the marketers have taken over and bastardized the TV market with features that simply dont server any purpose other than trying to outdo their competitors by bamboozling customers.

Bring back the Panasonic VT Plasma, whack a Roku 3 into it. Job done !!! only TV you will ever need until we move off 1080P.



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  Reply # 1218288 20-Jan-2015 13:43
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joker97: $$$ ;p considering a decent 50" can be had for $500 on sale, a 100" "technically" is 4 of those ... so ... umm $2,000 ;p


If only that were the case. I think the yields for 100" panels may not be quite the same as 50" i.e. how many 100" panels you get from a sheet of glass with no defects. 




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  Reply # 1218323 20-Jan-2015 14:32
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I pissed off a Noel Leeming employee the other day by not being sufficiently impressed by the new 4K UHD curved TVs. And by pointing out that there isn't any content to view on them yet. He argued that "its sooo much better".

I am perfectly happy with my 55" Samsung UF8000 and don't see the need for a 4K screen until there is actual 4K content around in abundance, and then I KNOW I will need a lot bigger screen than a 55" to be able to tell the difference. (Or I will have to move to a meter away from the TV).




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  Reply # 1218416 20-Jan-2015 16:24
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jarledb: I pissed off a Noel Leeming employee the other day by not being sufficiently impressed by the new 4K UHD curved TVs. And by pointing out that there isn't any content to view on them yet. He argued that "its sooo much better".


Wise move on your part. Next year's TVs will be sooo much better ^2, didn't you know?




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  Reply # 1218478 20-Jan-2015 18:16
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did he have one of them at home too?

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  Reply # 1218582 20-Jan-2015 20:36
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Panasonic showed their UHD optical disc player at CES... it will hit the stores soon enough, with movies to boot.
In theory, the new UHD BluRay standard + 10bit HDR panels will product pictures that are closer aligned to how we see colour.
Resolution sells TV's to the masses who like 'big numbers'.
Expanded colour gamut gets video geeks excited.

Samsung has curved TV's and SUHD because they are yet to get the mass production of OLED sorted.
If LG bring a range of HDR, flat, UHD OLED's to the market during 2015, I'll be interested... but I may be confused by the acronyms and buy the wrong TV...

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  Reply # 1218623 20-Jan-2015 21:42
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Maybe, but I will wait until a good range of content is widely available and reasonably priced - otherwise, there's little point in the upgrade.

I'm also concerned that early adopters might be burned by new DRM shenanigans, like early HD TV adopters with component inputs only did in the US, which is another reason to hold fire until a new standard becomes fairly ubiquitous. Hopefully, the DRM will be broken before I have to make a decision on a new set.

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