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  Reply # 1375201 27-Aug-2015 13:53
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Thanks Masterpiece, yes I do use Audyssey auto setup, unfortunately it cranks up the bass massively, to the point the sub wants to explode. I think it has got to do with the room being very un-bass friendly. It has an upsloping ceiling, no insulation, wood and glass and being the main perimeter enclosure.

I have also done the "crawl for bass" exercise, and put it where it is loud. Which is about 10m from the neighbour's bedroom. 

4 subs would be great, but still doesn't solve the social conundrum.

Yes we know each other, and I know they like their sleep :)

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  Reply # 1375392 27-Aug-2015 20:49
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In that case I suspect the mic is not sensing the sub wavelengths.

I suspect major renovations in the walls, roof and floor might be needed.

Something to try, since the world is largely perceptions you could try and fool the system auto setup.

Turn off the sub, run the audyssey, then turn the sub back on at a low level and progressively bring the level up until the sub levels sound adequate, but not excessive. After this does the sub levels boom outside and everywhere else excessively?

Download a dB meter app for your phone, even if it is wrong it will be near enough. I find the RTA Analyzer quite a nice app even in free limited version as it shows frequencies and may highlight issues or confirm or deny what you hear.




Masterpiece Calibration Ltd, isf certified

 

www.mastercal.co.nz

 

 

"I'm not a robot!"

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1381052 7-Sep-2015 12:16
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Wattage of the loudspeaker has nothing to do with the quality of sound and the richness of the lower end of the bandwidth.

Saying that as a electro-acoustics engineer who was building HiFI systems while at University and fixing HiFi systems for rock bands at home (30+ years ago).

My 20 year old 100 W custom-built speakers which form part of surround sound will outperform at 5W output in sound quality majority of consumer systmes available in

Harvey Norman and those do not disturb neighbours when watching blockbusters. They can't hear it at all.

The experience of listening to HiFi systmes is lost in the last two generations of consumers - fact.









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  Reply # 1381076 7-Sep-2015 12:48
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Masterpiece: In that case I suspect the mic is not sensing the sub wavelengths.

I suspect major renovations in the walls, roof and floor might be needed.

Something to try, since the world is largely perceptions you could try and fool the system auto setup.

Turn off the sub, run the audyssey, then turn the sub back on at a low level and progressively bring the level up until the sub levels sound adequate, but not excessive. After this does the sub levels boom outside and everywhere else excessively?

Download a dB meter app for your phone, even if it is wrong it will be near enough. I find the RTA Analyzer quite a nice app even in free limited version as it shows frequencies and may highlight issues or confirm or deny what you hear.


Hi, apologies for lack of updates, we were very busy.

I suspect my lounge area is losing the bass to the neighbours'. 1 - it is too large a volumetric area for the poor sub. took it to a mate's around 5 times less volumetrically and it just blasts away fine. 2 - the enclosure is not bouncing the waves (poorly insulated wood with full length glass walls aplenty. 3 - it leaks bass to the rest of the house - one long wall has no wall there, but japanese paper door panels.

the trial in another small enclosed room and it's fine. so the sub is retired for now.

PS I recall when i did my "crawl for bass" the best spot was high in a corner somewhere, and not on the floor, so i guess the lounge is the problem. and since I don't have any time to watch movies or listen to music I'll just feed my other hobby for now.




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  Reply # 1381077 7-Sep-2015 12:51
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RUKI: Wattage of the loudspeaker has nothing to do with the quality of sound and the richness of the lower end of the bandwidth.

Saying that as a electro-acoustics engineer who was building HiFI systems while at University and fixing HiFi systems for rock bands at home (30+ years ago).

My 20 year old 100 W custom-built speakers which form part of surround sound will outperform at 5W output in sound quality majority of consumer systmes available in

Harvey Norman and those do not disturb neighbours when watching blockbusters. They can't hear it at all.

The experience of listening to HiFi systmes is lost in the last two generations of consumers - fact.








of course it will. if your efficiency is 90dB/W @ 1m and you sit at 3 m from the thing and you put out 4W = 90dB.

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  Reply # 1381394 7-Sep-2015 20:49
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Actually your idea of localising the sub closer(behind) the seat may actually work quite well if your room is so leaky sound wise. I have had a similar small sub problem with my last place I lived in where the sub filled about 1/2 the room. First half boom boom, 2nd half no boom boom. Had a concrete floor so the solidness of that kept the sub heading out side, although when I used the sub to the rear the third bedroom right behind the sub vibrated with the sub and you couldn't actually be in there when watching a movie in the main room.

I'd try about 1~3m behind if you have room of course, just experiment fore aft left right. Sitting right on top might have the effect of the wavelengths passing by you and still have low sub effect.




Masterpiece Calibration Ltd, isf certified

 

www.mastercal.co.nz

 

 

"I'm not a robot!"



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  Reply # 1381396 7-Sep-2015 20:51
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Thanks, yeah that was the next thing to try, but never got to it.

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  Reply # 1381402 7-Sep-2015 21:04
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I was told that bass waves from a sub peak every 18 metres (Eastern Hi fi salesman). Does this make sense on a flat piece of ground?
I'm sure there are some more clued up members out there who can elaborate on this?



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  Reply # 1381412 7-Sep-2015 21:18
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low frequency = looooong wavelengths. so it's possible. i think my room is not reflecting any waves ... all escaped ...

it's ok i'm very happy with my 5.0 set up, my floors go down to 28 Hz so it's ok, just no shaking me, my sleeping kids, my wife, and my sleeping neighbours. oh well ...

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  Reply # 1381755 8-Sep-2015 13:51
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gumboot19: I was told that bass waves from a sub peak every 18 metres (Eastern Hi fi salesman). Does this make sense on a flat piece of ground?
I'm sure there are some more clued up members out there who can elaborate on this?




Natural sounds make sense on any ground. Go outside in the thunderstorm and try to remember that sound. Go to the place where waves are crashing and seagulls screaming. Remember that sound.
I never understand those walking on a beach with their ears plugged with headphones :(

Sound engineering is a science.

Mass market sound systems are aiming at your pocket and eye, not your ear.

Specifications in booklets and leaflets in electronic stores have little to do with sound quality / fidelity (e.g. 20Hz - 20KHz @ 20Db linearity; compression rate; sampling rate; "lossless codec" (sarcasm)).

Two generations are listening to compressed audio with low sampling rate and low bit stream using cheap headphones attached to their smartphones/mp3 players. That is not music, that is noise IMO.

Needless to say that a lot of people do not have "music ear" and can only hear very limited range – e.g. up to 10KHz at the upper level and down to 0.8KHz at the lower level if they lucky.

The test is simple - play analogue audio recording (or at least genuine CD mastered in analogue studio) of, say Luis Armstrong. Play at low level. Close your eyes. If it sounds like he is singing in the room alive - your speakers are up to specs :)

Go to the movie theater - quality of sound is the one you could use for your reference (and customers in the closest cafe can't hear a thing, right?)

P.S. Never trust salesman, who talks “specs” regardless where they are coming from :) and whatever they sell. You are not after Hertz and Dbs - you are after sound quality!

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