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288 posts

Ultimate Geek
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Topic # 194998 2-Apr-2016 10:48
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What is the current thinking on 4K Ultra High Definition TVs? 

 

When I last looked at them a year ago it seemed the consensus was that it was better to wait and maybe actually better to stick with a regular 1920x1080 Full High Definition TV instead.

 

I'm looking at getting a new TV that is somewhere around the 48" to 50" size - I really don't want to go any larger than that.  Should I be looking at UHD only at this point?  Should I sit on the sidelines a little longer?  I have a Samsung 40" LCD Series 6 that has treated me well the last 7 years, but I am thinking it is finally time to upgrade (and I'd like a slightly bigger screen as the 40" is feeling a little small for the room it is in).

 

Are Samsung and Sony still the leading brands to go with?

 

I guess I should ask if curved screen is worth the extra money?


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3307 posts

Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1524545 2-Apr-2016 12:08
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A higher resolution is nice if you're sitting close... but ultimately, meh.

 

The HDR (high dynamic range) offerings are the BIG performance difference for me. The introduction of UHD Blu-ray discs means content will be readily available (I saw a disc for the first time last week) in the very near future.

 

I think the time is nigh.

 

Get amongst it.

 

 

 

Also, make sure you get a TV that boasts HDMI 2.0a compatibility with HDCP 2.2.

 

If you have any home theatre gear (amp or soundbar) and plan to utilise an HDMI interface, make sure the amp / soundbar is compatible with HDMI 2.0a, HDCP 2.2 and offers HDR pass through (currently Marantz/Denon/Yamaha AVR's, but no soundbars at this point).

 

 

 

Samsung have UHD Blu-ray players out in the states... either import one or wait for NZ's offering to come in.


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  Reply # 1524554 2-Apr-2016 12:25
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Actually... looking into it I can't see an HDR compatible TV's in your size.

 

So.

 

Wait.

 

 

 

Unless someone knows of a new model that is rolling out soon?


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1524602 2-Apr-2016 14:19
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2016 TVs aren't available yet, but having just returned a 49" 4K 2015 Sony due to poor picture quality, I would probably look for a great 1080P TV at that size over a mediocre 4K TV in any case avoid IPS panels on TVs - look for PVA - RTings.com is a great source of reviews. You will notice the resolution difference if you put them side by side, but you would more notice contrast, black levels and colour accuracy. Samsung's 4k 2016 TVs are all full HDR certified (implying great picture quality) , so if you're dead set on a 4K TV, wait a couple more months

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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1524696 2-Apr-2016 16:55
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Current 4k displays are mostly transitional displays, that is greater resolution of the Rec709 standard with some capability's of Rec2020.
They were working their way towards Rec2020 with the other aspects of greater bit depth and such like, then HDR got added. This is the (a) in 2.0a.

HDR will be the next (current) tech upgrade within the 4k systems that when the public comes to grasp will naturally prefer as an image over any other feature, there is a few models with HDR10 and possibly Dolby Vision in the market but the basic problem is it is too early. The full guideline standard frame work hasn't been fully ratified at this time, the manufactures think it is so good they are developing their own takes on it, mostly based upon HDR10 which is a collection of systems not a specific framework.

The problem is that a TV offering HDR10 right now may or may not work with HDR content in five years when broadcast takes advantage of it. (Broadcast in the terms of all media).

I still feel a 2~5 year transition in NZ, since we are typically behind the US and EU by about a year.

If you are just happy with resolution, then 4k displays as they are reasonable.




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288 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1524699 2-Apr-2016 16:59
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And if most of my content is FHD and not 4K content, how well do the current crop of 4K displays do when displaying 1080p content? I assume it must upscale the content? Or will it somehow switch modes and display 1080p natively?


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  Reply # 1524702 2-Apr-2016 17:06
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spacedog:

 

And if most of my content is FHD and not 4K content, how well do the current crop of 4K displays do when displaying 1080p content? I assume it must upscale the content? Or will it somehow switch modes and display 1080p natively?

 

 

High quality high bitrate 1080P stuff on a 50" UHD looks fine (eg Blu-Ray or high bitrate Netflix), UHD looks better but at the size of TV you're looking at I doubt there will be a significant difference since 1080P looks fine.  Freeview HD doesn't look so great, but that's because it's low quality and wouldn't look that great on a FHD TV in any case. 

 

 


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  Reply # 1524711 2-Apr-2016 17:50
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spacedog:

 

And if most of my content is FHD and not 4K content, how well do the current crop of 4K displays do when displaying 1080p content? I assume it must upscale the content? Or will it somehow switch modes and display 1080p natively?

 

 

It looks great. You cant switch mode on a flat panel display, the pixels are part of the screen. Its not like CRT's where it can scan at any resolution you like. If there was no upscaling you would have a massive case of postage stamp sized video.





Richard rich.ms



288 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1525172 3-Apr-2016 12:50
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Sounds like I should really sit on the sideline a little bit longer until this HDR thing hits market (sigh)


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