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  # 1787249 24-May-2017 08:53
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"Will I see any difference between 1080 and PAL???"  Yes you will notice the difference..   PAL is a 576i analog TV standard dead  basically in the modern world.   





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  # 1787258 24-May-2017 09:03
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old3eyes:

 

"Will I see any difference between 1080 and PAL???"  Yes you will notice the difference..   PAL is a 576i analog TV standard dead  basically in the modern world.   

 

 

Mmm, dot crawl, lousy reds and deinterlacing artifacts!





Richard rich.ms

 
 
 
 


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  # 1787317 24-May-2017 10:37
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joker97:

 

cadman:

 

Senecio:

 

This is 2017. We have access to 4K HDR screens at a relatively affordable cost and many of us have access to >100 Mbit internet.

 

 

I can't presently justify 100Mbps internet. I certainly can't justify a 4K TV or monitor. Most people are like this.

 

 

FWIW, i got a 4K 50" very smart tv for 1 thousand dollars.

 

 

I still have that particular $1k in my pocket so I don't need to work for a couple of weeks if I want to do something else instead, just on that saving alone, and I'm not missing out on anything by not having a 4K resolution TV. Like I said earlier - cost vs benefit. I might buy one if they were say $150 because that's an acceptable cost for the benefits.


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  # 1787321 24-May-2017 10:42
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Jaxson:

 

How important is HD, really?

In 2017, with 4K quickly becoming standard for new TV's and digital cameras etc?

 

Very.

 

 

For digital cameras there'd be a practical argument to be made but considering they're mostly well beyond that 8.3MP already, even on reasonably inexpensive phones, the point is moot. For a mere display device like a television - not so much.


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  # 1787360 24-May-2017 11:42
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cadman:

 

Jaxson:

 

How important is HD, really?

In 2017, with 4K quickly becoming standard for new TV's and digital cameras etc?

 

Very.

 

 

For digital cameras there'd be a practical argument to be made but considering they're mostly well beyond that 8.3MP already, even on reasonably inexpensive phones, the point is moot. For a mere display device like a television - not so much.

 

 

 

 

What are you talking about?

 

My point re cameras is there is now a ever growing source of 4K content.  So over time, a 4K display to view that on makes more sense.

 

Netflix and YouTube already offer 4K content, there are 4K Bluray Players and discs (if you want to pay lots for this), and there are 4K Video sources from phones/cameras etc.

 

 

 

The standard stance early on is to say there's no content, but now there is. 
Broadcast TV won't be pushing this out in NZ any time soon, but then again that's a twilight media in some respects anyway, as ultrafast broadband picks up.

If you're not interested in a 4K TV, then that's fine, but we've all got different opinions about this.


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  # 1787399 24-May-2017 12:46
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At first i thought there was no 4k content. Thing is, my tv makes non 4k look better. No joke. 1080p/720p is stunning, SD looks like HD. Don't ask how it does it. Plus it can read my computers files, plays anything on the internet,, my devices, etc devicesrecords tv ... Wow




Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


D.W

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  # 1787488 24-May-2017 15:01
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Another thing I haven't seen mentioned (although I may have missed it) is gaming consoles now offering 4K content (upscaled and native).

 

Even if you're not interested in 4K specifically, if you're in the market for a new TV and you are looking at anything beyond the budget range, they're all 4K anyway.


 
 
 
 


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  # 1787520 24-May-2017 15:52
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When people dis the need for 4k all I hear is similar to angry nimbys saying they dont want something so noone needs it.





Richard rich.ms

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  # 1787817 24-May-2017 21:22
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I got a 4K tv recently as I have point and shoot camera (shock horror!) that can record in it. But I had nothing to view it on. I was surprised to see a few shows on Netflix are offered in 4K, I really ought to test it by watching an episode in 4K and again in HD.

 

For me it's a bit like connection speeds, sure you don't need fibre, but it's nice. Same for HD, I don't need it, but it's hard to go back.

 

F1 is being offered in 4K apparently. Not in NZ evidently. Now that's a sport that built for HD (and MotoGP).


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  # 1787940 25-May-2017 09:28
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Rikkitic:

 

 

 

What this tells me is that different people see different things according to their needs. Outmoded analogue SD can be a perfectly adequate viewing experience depending on what is being watched and how it is being viewed. For some, it will provide all they require. So don’t write off the old technology yet.

 

 

With the exception of some inferior/SD source material high definition content looks objectively better than that same content in SD. This is true for every screen size and device capable of playing back HD content - I'll wager you'd struggle to find something not capable of 1080p playback today.

 

If you watch the same material on the same device in SD and HD and cannot tell/don't care the difference then you are blind and the point is moot.

 

Most people will challenge you if they see no reason for you to continue watching SD when HD options are easily and cheaply available. No one (well, perhaps a fanatic or two) thinks everyone should buy a 4K TV right now because they are still quite expensive and native 4K is still quite limited in content availability but if you are still watching SD more than a decade on from the 'HD revolution' then there is room for some criticism. Especially on forums like GZ which has a bias toward 'geekiness' and isn't a layman forum, for example.




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  # 1787984 25-May-2017 09:57
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Points taken. However, our main TV viewing is in fact mostly SD upscaled to 1080p and we find it adequate for our purposes. We see no need to upgrade at this point. We are not blind, and we do know what the difference is as we have a 1080p TV as well as terrestrial Freeview and a Blu-Ray player. We just don't see it as an issue. SD is good enough.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  # 1788554 26-May-2017 09:28
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Rikkitic:

 

Points taken. However, our main TV viewing is in fact mostly SD upscaled to 1080p and we find it adequate for our purposes. We see no need to upgrade at this point. We are not blind, and we do know what the difference is as we have a 1080p TV as well as terrestrial Freeview and a Blu-Ray player. We just don't see it as an issue. SD is good enough.

 

 

But that means you aren't truly watching SD because it has been upscaled. You are already benefiting from HD. You're argument shouldn't be "SD is good enough", but rather "we see little benefit in upgrading our SD-only equipment, as our TV does a good enough job upscaling to HD".




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  # 1788566 26-May-2017 09:49
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I get your point, though what we see of course is not true HD. If I view it close up, it is a bit ragged and blurry. But from our position on the couch, it is perfectly acceptable for us. It is not HD, but it is not horrible either, though some purists might think so. The main thing is that it is super easy to record without any restrictions. It is a trade-off. Of course true HD is better, but we don't have a problem with this. I think to some extent at least, it is a matter of taste.

 

 

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  # 1788570 26-May-2017 09:51
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I'll throw my 2c in on this.

 

Having acquired an 4K TV (OLED), my wife who is usually a skeptic when it comes to picture quality was astounded by picture quality and detail. She's normally one who baulks at my desire for a good quality picture but she was mezmerised by 4K videos on Youtube for an entire night. Chances are if you've gone out and bought a 4K TV resolution does matter to you.

 

The issue I have is once you go up it's harder to go back down. Watch a lot of 4K content and suddenly something delivered over 576i composite looks like utter crap (not to mention needing to turn off all image smoothing and post processing as the TV will destroy smudgy images even more trying to 'fix' them). I would say though if you're going to be watching SD/HD/4K content, make sure the source is as good as it can be. 


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  # 1788595 26-May-2017 10:25
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The one thing we haven't talked about here is bit rate. A low bit rate HD source feed can look a lot worse than a high bit rate SD source. Bit rate is often compromised to shove more data down the same bandwidth (read +1 channels and alternative channels screening 90's sit-com re-runs).


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