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Wannabe Geek
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Topic # 235995 12-May-2018 21:47
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Hi all,

 

We are in the very early stages of planning a new house build.  So, I have one of those "how long is a piece of string" questions.

 

If you were starting from scratch, what would you do to set up a house for TV/media/data etc?  The house will have fibre. For example:

 

- would you bother with satellite TV at all? 

 

- Would you wire the house or just rely on Wi-Fi for streaming services?

 

-Music - wired in speakers or just use something like Sonos?

 

We're not uber afficiandos so don't need ultra high symphony orchestra quality, just middle of the road type solutions that work.

 

Any other general or specific guidance appreciated.  If you can point me to a good article or other source, that would also be much appreciated.

 

Cheers

 

Rick Shera

 

@lawgeeknz

 

 


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Glurp
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  Reply # 2014951 12-May-2018 22:02
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On the principle that it never hurts to have back-ups, I would include satellite as well as DVB-T if within range. Wi-fi is useful and sometimes essential but you definitely want Ethernet throughout the house as well. I would also wire for sound. Things you have and don't use are a lot less frustrating than things you want later but don't have. As far as details go, there are others here who know a lot more than I do so I will leave it to them.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2014960 12-May-2018 22:18
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- would you bother with satellite TV at all? Yes, I would use an IP SAT-antenna streaming independent 8 streams (users) via a wired gigabit network. Additionally you can use DVB-T2 and online streaming without big effort as mentioned before.

 

- Would you wire the house or just rely on Wi-Fi for streaming services? Wire, Cat.6 or Cat.6a, consider WiFi for portable devices as an add-on.

 

- Music - wired in speakers or just use something like Sonos? It depends on your favorite system. Maybe the main system wired and the others via air.





Nope, English isn't my mother tongue. But that's why I'm here. smile


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  Reply # 2014962 12-May-2018 22:25
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Double electrical plugs always.

Electrical plugs on every wall - at least one.

Outdoor electrical plugs (preferably 20A).

Having built 2 years ago we've since realised we could've used a few more plugs! So get as many as you can.

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  Reply # 2014965 12-May-2018 22:35
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Put in more cabling and power than you ever think you'll need. I cannot stress this enough. The number of people I see who cheap out here and regret it later, is huge. I see it a LOT. 

 

 


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  Reply # 2014972 12-May-2018 23:24
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Loads of power sockets but possibly more importantly, consider what will be around them and position them to suit. Sockets in the very corner of a bedroom are usually a terrible idea because they become inaccessible and often unusable. (Post a plan and I'll show you what I mean)

Wired networking is a must IMO. Loads faster and more reliable than wifi, and it's useful for other things too .
Coax is pretty cheap to do, I'd do it as well.
Speaker wiring in the walls can be handy, it prevents wires having to be run across the floor.

Consider sensors for outside lights. I have one for the light at the back door, it makes it so much easier to find the lock in the dark.

Floor drains in all wet areas (laundry, bathroom, under the hot water cylinder, etc). I've seen a few major floods in these areas, a drain would have made them little more than annoying.





Location: Dunedin

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2014982 13-May-2018 00:30
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Wouldn't use any fancy coax-wiring for TV reception since the network for distribution is already there.

 

Recommended here is IP network technology: http://www.satip.info/ 

 

I use *THIS* because the SATserver is included in the SAT antenna.





Nope, English isn't my mother tongue. But that's why I'm here. smile


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  Reply # 2015005 13-May-2018 08:43
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Run pvc conduit inside walls to media outlets, before insulation is installed. Makes it easy to remove/install cables as technology changes in the future.

 

Try to get the comms cabinet in a central location, rather than stuck out in the garage. Also make sure that a large one is installed so that more "toys" can be installed at a later date. Dedicated fuse for power supply? Leave room for a UPS?


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2015084 13-May-2018 12:32
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  • Consider cabling for PoE external security cameras too.
  • At least one network outlet in each bedroom
  • Big cabinet is a must!

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  Reply # 2015091 13-May-2018 12:39
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This is page with useful information from Chorus on house wiring: https://www.chorus.co.nz/help-and-support/wiring-broadband/wiring-homeowners

Burying conduit outdoors for the fibre lead in is standard. It would make sense to run some conduit internally for the fibre, so that the Chorus contractors don't have to drill messy holes in your brand new house.

I'd suggest you also run some cable for a centrally located ceiling mounted WiFi access point - probably more than one if you house is going to be large or multi-storey. This is a great way to get reliable whole-house coverage.

I would only install a satellite dish or UHF antenna if I was actually planning to use it myself, but if not, I would install some conduit where needed to make the install more straightforward later on.

Definitely get wiring for some good speaker locations in your entertainment room, rather than wireless speakers. Maybe some ceiling or wall mounted speakers?

mdf

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  Reply # 2015095 13-May-2018 12:49
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Hi Rick - welcome to Geekzone!

 

I am almost sure that no geek has ever uttered the words "I really regret all that ethernet cabling I put in the walls". I'm currently retrofitting it to our place. For robust, reliable connections (streaming and gaming) it is the best solution.

 

Even if you're more in the casual browsing/a little occasional latency is fine camp, it is still well worthwhile thinking about future proofing. WiGig / 802.11ad / next gen wifi will be coming around the corner at some point, using the super high 60GHz band. Which will allow super fast wifi but... won't go through walls. To take advantage of this awesomeness, you will likely need a WAP in each room. Ceiling mounted POE is definitely the way of the future, and if you're planning a single storey house with good attic space to run cables later, you can get away with a big ol' conduit to your patch panel. But if you're going multi storey or with difficult roofspaces, I think you'd be nuts not to at least have a run or two of ethernet to each living space at minimum. I'd probably spec at least one cable in the roof and two in the wall for every room. But that could be argued as excessive (probably not on this site). Ethernet itself is cheap, so even running it and leaving it in the walls without jackpoints is potentially a good option.

 

I'm less concerned about coax etc. We've been in our current place two years and I still haven't got around to wiring in a freeview antenna/satellite, even though there is actually an easy run of conduit down to the back of the TV. We don't miss it.


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  Reply # 2015106 13-May-2018 13:17
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Also sending video just doesnt seem to work with current cat6 based products that claim 4k support. They are either being trick and only doing 24/30Hz, have stupidly short distance limits, or just make claims that they cannot support. 60Hz HDR 4k is the norm now, so putting in obsolete 1080p products is just as foolish as distributing RF was with sky boxes.

 

There are many lower cost fiber based things come out now to do it. Saw a video of one which had a field terminatable by clumsy oafs type connector on it, single fiber 4k 60 HDR and bidirectional over a single tiny fiber on someones youtube channel a few days ago. $400 or 500 US from memory which is _way_ cheaper than some of the cat6 based options are.

 

If you are not putting that in now, you will need to allow for that by putting in counduits, draw wires and no sharp bends in it. The flexible stuff is a PITA and I have had no end of problems pulling stuff thru that compared to solid so I would stick with solid. What happens on the flex stuff is it snags, and then starts to compress (or expand if youre pushing) the conduit like a spring.





Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 2015118 13-May-2018 13:59
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Run Cat cable everywhere.

 

The standard is to run  3 x Cat cables to every TV.

 

All equipment (router / audio kit / security camera NVR etc) can go in a cupboard under the stairs etc... make sure it has airflow though! I'd suggest putting it in a server rack - again, these don't cost the earth.

 

 

 

Re: sound systems.

 

WiFi systems are for retro-fitting into existing homes. Hard wire from a central point to the speakers when possible.

 

In-ceiling speakers are great for 'background music', but bookshelf / floor standing speakers are for when you want to sit down and enjoy your music or movies. Everything else is a compromise... and often the compromises end up costing more than the 'real thing'.

 

Almost all home theatre amps are now controlled via apps and capable of creating their own multi-room system so you can pipe Sky TV or Netflix sound around the house, or indeed play Spotify or Tidal... or, well, whatever takes your fancy.

 

 

 

My advice, get your house plans and take them to 2 x people.

 

1: A network designer... your world will only become more and more 'connected' in the future, so make sure the infrastructure is there so you can adapt.

 

2: An experienced audio visual person... guesses and best wishes on forums can lead to costly mistakes.

 

While there's plenty of network gurus on this forum, I'm yet to see any experience AV system designers on here doling our expert advice. Just saying...


mdf

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Reply # 2015120 13-May-2018 14:05
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richms:

 

... Saw a video of one which had a field terminatable by clumsy oafs type connector on it...

 

 

@richms describing my efforts at cabling!


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  Reply # 2015121 13-May-2018 14:08
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Anyone have experience or recommendations for inwall cable systems, to allow you to fix TVs to walls, without having the wires hanging down under it, for a new build? Eg there is an inlet / plate with a hole at the bottom of the wall for the wires to feed  into, and an outlet at the top where the TV is, where the wires come out. The only systems I have seen don't have any conduit between them, so if you have insulation, that gets in the way of the wires feeding up. Or do these systems get custom made. The alternative is to have the outlets behind the TV, but if you decide you don't want a TV in that location, it looks ugly to have all those outlets so high up

 

 


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  Reply # 2015163 13-May-2018 15:01
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Run a couple of empty conduits up/down the inside of the wall. One for power, one for data, aerial etc. Record exactly where they are located.

 

If you decide to put the TV there, you can cut the gib to expose them and pull the cables through.

 

 


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