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  Reply # 2015187 13-May-2018 15:32
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If you don't need a dish/antenna now, then just leave a coil of coax that runs back to your hub. And I'd only do a single run of coax to entertainment areas as it will soon be redundant

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  Reply # 2015218 13-May-2018 16:05
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k1w1k1d:

 

Run a couple of empty conduits up/down the inside of the wall. One for power, one for data, aerial etc. Record exactly where they are located.

 

If you decide to put the TV there, you can cut the gib to expose them and pull the cables through.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks. Is it advisable to have separate ones for each type of cable to reduce the risk of interference, or can the aerial and data ones go in the same one?


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  Reply # 2015270 13-May-2018 17:47

Pretty sure everything except power can be together.


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  Reply # 2015284 13-May-2018 18:10
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----"" I am almost sure that no geek has ever uttered the words "I really regret all that ethernet cabling I put in the walls"".  

 

Well 30 years ago I installed coaxial and telephone cables all over the place, and little of it was ever used. I would not be putting ethernet cable everywhere now, except for up in the ceiling space. Wifi APs powered over ethernet located and mounted on the ceiling give you 800Mbs if you are in the same room, so install one in most busy rooms.

 

We have had an expensive surround-sound system for a couple of decades, and for a decade it was marvellous, but it now hardly ever gets used. Blue-tooth headsets have come a long way. In fact our huge 4k lounge TV doesn't get that much use now either. The wife prefers her large iPad and I like a lap-top, and it just seems selfish to fill up the lounge space with one person's TV/computer noise. Some of us like to still read books too!!


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  Reply # 2015459 14-May-2018 04:14
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JessieB:

 

----"" I am almost sure that no geek has ever uttered the words "I really regret all that ethernet cabling I put in the walls"".  

 

Well 30 years ago I installed coaxial and telephone cables all over the place, and little of it was ever used. I would not be putting ethernet cable everywhere now, except for up in the ceiling space. Wifi APs powered over ethernet located and mounted on the ceiling give you 800Mbs if you are in the same room, so install one in most busy rooms.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I could not disagree more...

 

AP's are for cell phones, tablets and laptops - that's where it should end.

 

Got a printer? Hard wire it. The OP wants distributed music, hard wire it.

 

 

 

We now live in a connected world, WiFi is a convenience thing, that's all. Category cable is to be run, it takes video, it takes data, it takes audio - and most importantly it does it in a reliable and secure manner. Never be fooled by theoretical speeds boasted by AP manufacturers, real world performance is the key. Try turning on the microwave and seeing what speeds you get...


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  Reply # 2015524 14-May-2018 09:25
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Lots of this has been said above, and isn't necessarily media related, but what I'd do if i was building a house on, apart from the normal run ethernet/RG6 to every room and have a central data cabinet:

 

Run Ethernet to every external corner of your house in the roof for potential security cameras. Also to above the front door.

 

Run a conduit down next to your front door to be used for cabling for a connected front door bell/cam.

 

Ethernet in the ceiling for ceiling mounted ap's. One in every "hall", and living room/lounge.

 

Run not connected to the mains TPS power cable to every room for a mains powered connected fire alarm system. From what I've read, these use TPS power cabling chained off each other to power each alarm down the chain, and trigger each alarm. You will obviously need one connected to the mains to power the first one in the ceiling.

 

If your house will have a lot of large windows, like a lot of modern houses do, get a powered window blinds/shades system. Automatic at sunset/sunrise, or a timer based one is best. Even if it's not a "smart" integrated system, just look at this as an option. One person i know who moved into a large house hates having to spend 10-20 minutes each day opening and closing all the blinds.

 

Run all the cabling in your walls in ducting. Makes it much easier to replace in the future if needed. Don't use flex/ribbed ducts.

 

Run speaker wire for a surround sound system. Again in ducts if running in walls.

 

Placing your data cabinet/cupboard, or at least some kind of cupboard, behind, or to the side, of your main TV means you can have all your direct connected receivers/players easily within reach for cabling but also hidden out of site.

 

If using a projector, consider an inbuilt ceiling mounted retractable screen. You may need to check how the ceiling/roof beams etc are being put in, and if possible get a large void against a long run where you can mount this. A ceiling mounted projector is easier to mount but again, check the beams and plan.

 

That's all I've got so far.

 

 




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  Reply # 2015736 14-May-2018 13:52
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Hey, thanks everyone for the insights, particularly the pretty consistent message to cat6 to fixed points like TVs, home office, security cameras/sensors, and to WAPs in the ceiling.

 

@lawgeeknz


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  Reply # 2017183 16-May-2018 20:32
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I second the conduit recommendation. If you run conduit with face plates from pretty much every room then it's pretty easy to change the cabling if the technology changes, or you realise you have run something daft.

 

It's the sort of thing that is relatively easy and inexpensive to install when doing a new build, but quite a bit more difficult and expensive to retrofit after you have built.


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