Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3
3363 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 455


  Reply # 2060744 23-Jul-2018 06:47
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Get the professionals involved - trust me, you'll sleep better.


865 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 119


  Reply # 2060763 23-Jul-2018 07:53
Send private message quote this post

Bung: If it is similar to my earlier LG the stand attaches with 4 m4 screws that thread into the steel chassis of the tv.

I have looked at the extractors that Andrew uses and see that they are different to the easy outs that I never had much time for. I may try them.

 

 

 

Photo please


1619 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 382

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2060770 23-Jul-2018 08:01
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Please use a title that reflects the actual issue. I was interested in how you could stuff up the TV purchase but I'm totally uninterested in a stripped screw head which is what the thread is really about.


2301 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 903

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2060771 23-Jul-2018 08:04
Send private message quote this post

+1 for the screw extractors and -1 for drilling out. Drilling out will allow you to remove the screw head and the part it is securing, but you won't remove the remainder of the screw so won't be able to put a new screw in to secure the part. The extractor resolves that.

 

 


2490 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 310


  Reply # 2060781 23-Jul-2018 08:33
Send private message quote this post

kryptonjohn:

+1 for the screw extractors and -1 for drilling out. Drilling out will allow you to remove the screw head and the part it is securing, but you won't remove the remainder of the screw so won't be able to put a new screw in to secure the part. The extractor resolves that.


 



This is where I disagree. If the screw hasn't been cross threaded once the stand has been removed there is little pressure on what is left of the screw. You should have the thickness of the stand left to grip. Sometimes you don't even need pliers to turn what's left. We are not talking about something that's rusted up.

2301 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 903

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2060784 23-Jul-2018 08:40
Send private message quote this post

Bung:
kryptonjohn:

 

+1 for the screw extractors and -1 for drilling out. Drilling out will allow you to remove the screw head and the part it is securing, but you won't remove the remainder of the screw so won't be able to put a new screw in to secure the part. The extractor resolves that.

 

 

 

 

 



This is where I disagree. If the screw hasn't been cross threaded once the stand has been removed there is little pressure on what is left of the screw. You should have the thickness of the stand left to grip. Sometimes you don't even need pliers to turn what's left. We are not talking about something that's rusted up.

 

Maybe! I was totally assuming one of two things: if the screw head has been totally stripped then it was jammed solid so couldn't be gripped well enough to turn... or secondly, that there's insufficient screw shaft left to grip once the head is drilled off. 

 

Sod's law usually delivers one of the above to me!

 

 




424 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 80


  Reply # 2060860 23-Jul-2018 10:31
Send private message quote this post

Click to see full size

 

Click to see full size

 

 

 

Have taken these photos.  Have tried a lot of the suggestions here but not having any luck.

 

Also frustrating that I can't transport the television even if I wanted to as the stand is stuck on.

 

Am trying to get a professional to come round and look at it but struggling to find the right professional.  Seems it's more of a handyman task than an electrician.


865 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 119


  Reply # 2060875 23-Jul-2018 10:47
Send private message quote this post

GeoffisPure:

 

Click to see full size

 

Click to see full size

 

 

 

Have taken these photos.  Have tried a lot of the suggestions here but not having any luck.

 

Also frustrating that I can't transport the television even if I wanted to as the stand is stuck on.

 

Am trying to get a professional to come round and look at it but struggling to find the right professional.  Seems it's more of a handyman task than an electrician.

 

 

 

 

If it was me, I would get a pin punch and a small gasket hammer and give it a firm but not too hard tap anticlockwise on the edge of the screw. It should loosen with only one tap and then wind out, make sure all the other screws are loose when you try and take the damaged one out so the're not holding load on it. That's how we get the special screws out that are designed to break off the hex heads in steering column ignition barrels to remove them.

 

 

 

I wouldn't attempt to drill it out, those screws are usually stainless steel and quite hard and if you don't get it dead centre you're in more trouble.


Glurp
7789 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3635

Subscriber

  Reply # 2060882 23-Jul-2018 11:00
Send private message quote this post

This is definitely not an electrician job. I see the other screws are in. Can you get them all loose without problem? If you really cannot turn the screw that is stuck then an extractor would be best if you can fit it in the hole. Try to see if you can get someone from a machine shop to come around. 

 

A very last resort, though not really desirable with such an expensive TV, is just to carefully break away the plastic surround that the screw is holding. If you can get in there with a small drill bit and drill around the screw until the plastic breaks free, the stand will still work perfectly well with just three screws. From the video it appears to slot into place and the screws just hold it in position. Three screws will do this perfectly adequately.

 

https://www.wikihow.com/Remove-a-Stripped-Screw

 

 

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


1687 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 362

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 2060925 23-Jul-2018 11:33
Send private message quote this post

clevedon:

 

GeoffisPure:

 

Click to see full size

 

Click to see full size

 

 

If it was me, I would get a pin punch and a small gasket hammer and give it a firm but not too hard tap anticlockwise on the edge of the screw. It should loosen with only one tap and then wind out, make sure all the other screws are loose when you try and take the damaged one out so the're not holding load on it. That's how we get the special screws out that are designed to break off the hex heads in steering column ignition barrels to remove them.

 

I wouldn't attempt to drill it out, those screws are usually stainless steel and quite hard and if you don't get it dead centre you're in more trouble.

 

 

And while the tv is upright of course, so you are tapping downwards at around 10:30 on a clock face. VERY GENTLY!

 

Yuk, bad luck





________

 

AK

 

 

 

Click to see full size


4750 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1924


  Reply # 2060926 23-Jul-2018 11:33
Send private message quote this post

Normally I would try: -

 

1) Narrow nose vice grips (won't work here due to insufficient clearance and flush-mount head).

 

2) Hacksaw a slot and use flat head (insufficient clearance)

 

3) Impact driver (probably not suitable for a TV)

 

4) Spot heat screw with a mini blow torch, then shock cool with an aerosol spray (risky for surrounding plastic).

 

5) A sharp nosed  punch at about a 30* angle to tap the screw around

 

6) Screw extractor.

 

Of all those options (5) or the screw extractor look best at this point in time. I have a set of Irwin screw extractors that have saved my bacon a few times.

 

Another technique that might work is using a Dremel with a conical grinding bit to reduce the diameter of the screw head enough to allow you to grip it with narrow nosed vice-grips (I'm a fan of Irwin for the vice grips too).





Mike

552 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 53

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2060928 23-Jul-2018 11:37
Send private message quote this post

That screw is certainly well graunched... a serious PITA...

 

I wouldn't try any impact methods as the screw is too deep in the well and the thread will be well gripped by the plastic.

 

1. Reverse sharpen a drill bit that is about 1/2 the diameter of the head of the problem screw.

 

Use an egg beater drill so that you can apply downward pressure squarely on the screw and then reverse turn the drill by the large gear... slowly... so that the drill bites the screw head.... and hopefully unscrews the screw.

 

2. Using something like JB Weld epoxy glue, carefully bond a pointed nail or longer pointed screw onto the head of the problem screw... wait a couple of days for the epoxy to harden and then use pliers to carefully undo the screw....

 

My 2 cents worth...

 

 





Gordy

2689 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 712

Subscriber

  Reply # 2060932 23-Jul-2018 11:38
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Hammerer:

 

Please use a title that reflects the actual issue. I was interested in how you could stuff up the TV purchase but I'm totally uninterested in a stripped screw head which is what the thread is really about.

 

 

 

 

@Hammerer Haha - I see what you did there!


1903 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1051


  Reply # 2060958 23-Jul-2018 12:26
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

The extractors I've linked previously will get this out.
If you're in Dunedin, I'll do it for you.

Please don't drill the head off or hit it with anything. It'll be pretty hard getting insurance if you've abused it.




Location: Dunedin

236 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 18

Subscriber

  Reply # 2060967 23-Jul-2018 12:50
Send private message quote this post

I have used allen keys, find one that is a neat fit and tap it into the hole, If redrilling the hole buy a drill that is slightly smaller than the allen key

 

Video of a silimilar problem on a larger scale

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VeBmuWS6T5A

 

 

 

Edit relooking at that photo, an allen or torx head will tap right into that and grip well


1 | 2 | 3
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

The Warehouse leaps into the AI future with Google
Posted 15-Aug-2018 17:56


Targus set sights on enterprise and consumer growth in New Zealand
Posted 13-Aug-2018 13:47


Huawei to distribute nova 3i in New Zealand
Posted 9-Aug-2018 16:23


Home robot Vector to be available in New Zealand stores
Posted 9-Aug-2018 14:47


Panasonic announces new 2018 OLED TV line up
Posted 7-Aug-2018 16:38


Kordia completes first live 4K TV broadcast
Posted 1-Aug-2018 13:00


Schools get safer and smarter internet with Managed Network Upgrade
Posted 30-Jul-2018 20:01


DNC wants a safer .nz in the coming year
Posted 26-Jul-2018 16:08


Auldhouse becomes an AWS Authorised Training Delivery Partner in New Zealand
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:55


Rakuten Kobo launches Kobo Clara HD entry level reader
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:44


Kiwi team reaches semi-finals at the Microsoft Imagine Cup
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:38


KidsCan App to Help Kiwi Children in Need
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:32


FUJIFILM announces new high-performance lenses
Posted 24-Jul-2018 14:57


New FUJIFILM XF10 introduces square mode for Instagram sharing
Posted 24-Jul-2018 14:44


OPPO brings advanced technology to the smartphone market with new device
Posted 24-Jul-2018 09:20



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.