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961 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2149687 23-Dec-2018 20:13
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Ok, great. A few questions if you don't mind;

 

Why a Sony tv?

 

 

My preference for Sony is mainly due to the CEC implementation. CEC allows devices to be controlled via HDMI. Different manufacturers do it differently. Some will turn on remote devices such as Blu-ray players when the TV is turned on, others will turn on when the external device is powered on. Sony TVs work nicely - OSMC can be fully (?) controlled via the standard television remote. I'm not saying Sony is the only choice, only that I know it's a good one. I rarely have to pick up another remote.

 

 

How do you connect the TV with the NAS. WiFi or ethernet cable I guess?

 

 

I don't. I'd connect the Vero 4k+ to wired gigabit Ethernet, and the player to the TV via HDMI. I use a grand total of zero smart TV features.

 

 

I looked at OSMC Vero but don't quit get why I need it?

 

 

OSMC is an excellent platform dedicated to running Kodi, and it does so exceptionally well. Any device, including a smart TV that runs Kodi will do in theory. The Vero 4k+ will play almost any content you download or rip locally, including UHD content. The Vero is not a good choice for you if you want to run other apps however.

 

 

Why not the WD NAS? (just curious why you go for Synology)

 

 

The WD NAS is more powerful than you need purely for storage. Synology is just a personal preference based on familiarity and ease of use compared to other NAS boxes I've used. They have a range of devices at different price points. If you don't need something capable of transcoding, you can pick something up for a fraction of the cost of the WD unit mentioned.

 

 

How important is the internal memory? I do not want buffering. As you can go as low as 256mb which seems to me as really really low?
This seems to be a good option. Agreed? https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/NASSYN02186/Synology-DiskStation-DS218-2-Bay-NAS-Server-Dual-C

 

 

If you're using it for storage, the amount of memory isn't very important. If you're running apps, it may be significant.

 

I would look at something like this instead...

 

https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/NASSYN04180/Synology-DiskStation-DS418j-4-Bay-NAS-Server-RTD12

 

This leaves room for expansion, even if you don't require redundancy.

 

I have two Synology NAS boxes, one 8-bay, and an older version of the above. It runs my tvheadend live TV cache for five televisions, records CCTV for four cameras, both via iSCSI, and provides backup storage. Purely for shifting data around, without any transcoding etc., these boxes work very well.

 

 

Could you explain maybe what Plex is, when you you say I do not need it. When would you need?
You don't need Plex to view your files from different devices? They all can connect to the NAS?

 

 

Correct. If you have a player like Kodi, you can access content directly off the NAS - no transcoding necessary, so long as the player can play it, hence the recommendation for the current best-of-breed Vero 4k+. I can't comment in detail on what Plex offers because I don't use it, but it does allow transcoding so various players can access the content. If you have good players, you don't need to transcode.


5150 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 2149692 23-Dec-2018 20:44
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Just for kicks having read this thread I installed a Plex server on a RPi3 accessing content on a USB 3.0 drive connected to a Windows desktop accessing the content using CIFS.

 

Did take a bit of time to scan and download all the metadata but I can play (over GbE) using my Odroid C2 client, Atmos content (which is Dolby TrueHD plus metadata) with no buffering.

 

The Pi has to do no transcoding since the client has sufficient power to decode the content natively.

 

I get the impression reading this thread that the OP had a question but the responders (including myself) really had no idea of the OP's technical background or experience so we offered our own solutions with a lot of what I used to read in maths texts "the rest is left as an exercise for the reader" :-)

 

Hopefully the exercise is not too hard!





Staying in Wellington. Check out my AirBnB in the Wellington CBD.  https://www.airbnb.co.nz/rooms/32019730  Mention GZ to get a 10% discount

 

System One: Popcorn Hour A200,  PS3 SuperSlim, NPVR and Plex Server running on Gigabyte Brix (Windows 10 Pro), Sony BDP-S390 BD player, Pioneer AVR, Raspberry Pi running Kodi and Plex, Panasonic 60" 3D plasma, Google Chromecast

System Two: Popcorn Hour A200 ,  Oppo BDP-80 BluRay Player with hardware mode to be region free, Vivitek HD1080P 1080P DLP projector with 100" screen, Denon AVRS730H 7.2 Channel Dolby Atmos/DTS-X AV Receiver, Samsung 4K player, Google Chromecast, Odroid C2 running Kodi and Plex

 

 


 
 
 
 




16 posts

Geek


  # 2149957 24-Dec-2018 12:23
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SirHumphreyAppleby:

 

 

Ok, great. A few questions if you don't mind;

 

Why a Sony tv?

 

 

My preference for Sony is mainly due to the CEC implementation. CEC allows devices to be controlled via HDMI. Different manufacturers do it differently. Some will turn on remote devices such as Blu-ray players when the TV is turned on, others will turn on when the external device is powered on. Sony TVs work nicely - OSMC can be fully (?) controlled via the standard television remote. I'm not saying Sony is the only choice, only that I know it's a good one. I rarely have to pick up another remote.

 

 

How do you connect the TV with the NAS. WiFi or ethernet cable I guess?

 

 

I don't. I'd connect the Vero 4k+ to wired gigabit Ethernet, and the player to the TV via HDMI. I use a grand total of zero smart TV features.

 

Our new home build will start after the brake. There will be a allocated box for all connections. Does the length of the cable matter these days?
As I don't want anything but the tv and speakers in the lounge. So will wire everything from that box to the tv and to the centrally located amplifier.
What do you mean with "wired gigabit Ethernet"?

 

 

I looked at OSMC Vero but don't quit get why I need it?

 

 

OSMC is an excellent platform dedicated to running Kodi, and it does so exceptionally well. Any device, including a smart TV that runs Kodi will do in theory. The Vero 4k+ will play almost any content you download or rip locally, including UHD content. The Vero is not a good choice for you if you want to run other apps however.

 

What other apps could I potentially be looking at?

 

 

Why not the WD NAS? (just curious why you go for Synology)

 

 

The WD NAS is more powerful than you need purely for storage. Synology is just a personal preference based on familiarity and ease of use compared to other NAS boxes I've used. They have a range of devices at different price points. If you don't need something capable of transcoding, you can pick something up for a fraction of the cost of the WD unit mentioned.

 

 

How important is the internal memory? I do not want buffering. As you can go as low as 256mb which seems to me as really really low?
This seems to be a good option. Agreed? https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/NASSYN02186/Synology-DiskStation-DS218-2-Bay-NAS-Server-Dual-C

 

 

If you're using it for storage, the amount of memory isn't very important. If you're running apps, it may be significant.

 

I would look at something like this instead...

 

https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/NASSYN04180/Synology-DiskStation-DS418j-4-Bay-NAS-Server-RTD12

 

This leaves room for expansion, even if you don't require redundancy.

 

I have two Synology NAS boxes, one 8-bay, and an older version of the above. It runs my tvheadend live TV cache for five televisions, records CCTV for four cameras, both via iSCSI, and provides backup storage. Purely for shifting data around, without any transcoding etc., these boxes work very well.

 

I really don't need a lot of storage (been backup my mac for years with 500gig. It is full now but if I have 4 TB I have enough for years I think. I Rather have a faster processor. Would take make sense?

 

 

Could you explain maybe what Plex is, when you you say I do not need it. When would you need?
You don't need Plex to view your files from different devices? They all can connect to the NAS?

 

 

Correct. If you have a player like Kodi, you can access content directly off the NAS - no transcoding necessary, so long as the player can play it, hence the recommendation for the current best-of-breed Vero 4k+. I can't comment in detail on what Plex offers because I don't use it, but it does allow transcoding so various players can access the content. If you have good players, you don't need to transcode.

 

Perfect. I think you help me sort on what I need. Really appreciate you taking the time to help out!!

 




16 posts

Geek


  # 2149960 24-Dec-2018 12:27
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lchiu7:

 

Just for kicks having read this thread I installed a Plex server on a RPi3 accessing content on a USB 3.0 drive connected to a Windows desktop accessing the content using CIFS.

 

Did take a bit of time to scan and download all the metadata but I can play (over GbE) using my Odroid C2 client, Atmos content (which is Dolby TrueHD plus metadata) with no buffering.

 

The Pi has to do no transcoding since the client has sufficient power to decode the content natively.

 

I get the impression reading this thread that the OP had a question but the responders (including myself) really had no idea of the OP's technical background or experience so we offered our own solutions with a lot of what I used to read in maths texts "the rest is left as an exercise for the reader" :-)

 

Hopefully the exercise is not too hard!

 

 

 

 

hahaha your spot on. Should have mentioned that I am completely new. Was drowning for a day or two but it is slowly becoming clear. Appreciate the help I got a lot. 15 years a go I build networks and could take a pc apart with my eyes closed. (no not really) but than the MAC came and I never looked back at pc's. So the hobby's changed :) It is all very interesting though.

 

 


961 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2149964 24-Dec-2018 12:54
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Pinpoint:

 

Our new home build will start after the brake. There will be a allocated box for all connections. Does the length of the cable matter these days?
As I don't want anything but the tv and speakers in the lounge. So will wire everything from that box to the tv and to the centrally located amplifier.
What do you mean with "wired gigabit Ethernet"?

 

 

I would avoid HDMI cables over 2-3m. The player needs to be connected to the TV and the computer network. It's best to do this using a cable (Cat5e or better), and use gigabit devices where possible. You can get away with playing most content over 100Mbs^-1 Ethernet, but 1000Mbs^-1 is preferable, particularly if you're playing UHD content. Wireless Ethernet isn't a good choice for streaming high quality media.

 

Please post more details of how you connect your amplifier, so people can recommend how to wire everything together. Is it a receiver with HDMI in/out, or does it get its feed from the TV, or directly from another device (e.g. DVD player)? This may alter your hardware requirements.

 

 

What other apps could I potentially be looking at?

 

 

Things like Netflix, TVNZ On Demand etc., are available as apps for Android TV devices. I don't use any of these.

 

 

I really don't need a lot of storage (been backup my mac for years with 500gig. It is full now but if I have 4 TB I have enough for years I think. I Rather have a faster processor. Would take make sense?

 

 

It won't hurt, but it is likely unnecessary.




16 posts

Geek


# 2150004 24-Dec-2018 13:17
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SirHumphreyAppleby:

 

Pinpoint:

 

Our new home build will start after the brake. There will be a allocated box for all connections. Does the length of the cable matter these days?
As I don't want anything but the tv and speakers in the lounge. So will wire everything from that box to the tv and to the centrally located amplifier.
What do you mean with "wired gigabit Ethernet"?

 

 

I would avoid HDMI cables over 2-3m. The player needs to be connected to the TV and the computer network. It's best to do this using a cable (Cat5e or better), and use gigabit devices where possible. You can get away with playing most content over 100Mbs^-1 Ethernet, but 1000Mbs^-1 is preferable, particularly if you're playing UHD content. Wireless Ethernet isn't a good choice for streaming high quality media.

 

Please post more details of how you connect your amplifier, so people can recommend how to wire everything together. Is it a receiver with HDMI in/out, or does it get its feed from the TV, or directly from another device (e.g. DVD player)? This may alter your hardware requirements.

 

I looked up the dimensions of the Vero. It is only 2cm thick??? Can easily fit behind the tv, so out of sight.
I estimate the distance from TV & Vero to where the modem, NAS & amplifier will sit to be about 8 meters in cable length. I guess I need to buy a really decent HDMI cable. 

 

I am unsure what you mean with using gigabit devices. Which once would that be, the modem/router?
We have a standard internet modem that came with the connection. Should I replace this?

 

 

What other apps could I potentially be looking at?

 

 

Things like Netflix, TVNZ On Demand etc., are available as apps for Android TV devices. I don't use any of these.

 

We definitely use Netflix. But I might need to chat private with you on where you get all the movies and series from :)

 

 

I really don't need a lot of storage (been backup my mac for years with 500gig. It is full now but if I have 4 TB I have enough for years I think. I Rather have a faster processor. Would take make sense?

 

 

It won't hurt, but it is likely unnecessary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

So the amplifier has both wifi as an ethernet connection. It also has multiple HDMI connections. 7 in, hardly used and 2 out (monitor ARC & monitor2)

 

Would be very helpful to get the right advice on how to connect this to the TV for surround.

 

 

 

 


961 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2150007 24-Dec-2018 13:35
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Pinpoint:

 

I looked up the dimensions of the Vero. It is only 2cm thick??? Can easily fit behind the tv, so out of sight.
I estimate the distance from TV & Vero to where the modem, NAS & amplifier will sit to be about 8 meters in cable length. I guess I need to buy a really decent HDMI cable. 

 

I am unsure what you mean with using gigabit devices. Which once would that be, the modem/router?
We have a standard internet modem that came with the connection. Should I replace this?

 

 

For the HDMI connection, you probably want Vero -> Amplifier -> TV. Keep these cables as short as you can. Note that going through the amp may cause issues with CEC. The Vero itself uses an RF remote, so you don't need line of sight to the device to use it.

 

For Ethernet, the NAS and Vero should connect directly to the router. Most routers these days have built-in gigabit switches, so you will be fine with that. Even if it's only 100Mbs^-1, it's not the end of the world. These cables can be up to 100m, so that's not an issue.

 

 

We definitely use Netflix. But I might need to chat private with you on where you get all the movies and series from :)

 

 

The Vero might not be the right choice for you if you want to use Netflix via the same interface. Netflix is supported in Kodi 18, but that's not yet released, won't support 4k playback (at least not on the Vero), and you're still shut out from using other apps.

 

 

So the amplifier has both wifi as an ethernet connection. It also has multiple HDMI connections. 7 in, hardly used and 2 out (monitor ARC & monitor2)

 

Would be very helpful to get the right advice on how to connect this to the TV for surround.

 

 

It's best to bypass the TV for sound altogether. The TV will usually have an optical out, but this limits what formats are supported.


 
 
 
 




16 posts

Geek


  # 2150111 24-Dec-2018 15:49
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SirHumphreyAppleby:

 

Pinpoint:

 

I looked up the dimensions of the Vero. It is only 2cm thick??? Can easily fit behind the tv, so out of sight.
I estimate the distance from TV & Vero to where the modem, NAS & amplifier will sit to be about 8 meters in cable length. I guess I need to buy a really decent HDMI cable. 

 

I am unsure what you mean with using gigabit devices. Which once would that be, the modem/router?
We have a standard internet modem that came with the connection. Should I replace this?

 

 

For the HDMI connection, you probably want Vero -> Amplifier -> TV. Keep these cables as short as you can. Note that going through the amp may cause issues with CEC. The Vero itself uses an RF remote, so you don't need line of sight to the device to use it.

 

For Ethernet, the NAS and Vero should connect directly to the router. Most routers these days have built-in gigabit switches, so you will be fine with that. Even if it's only 100Mbs^-1, it's not the end of the world. These cables can be up to 100m, so that's not an issue.

 

 

We definitely use Netflix. But I might need to chat private with you on where you get all the movies and series from :)

 

 

The Vero might not be the right choice for you if you want to use Netflix via the same interface. Netflix is supported in Kodi 18, but that's not yet released, won't support 4k playback (at least not on the Vero), and you're still shut out from using other apps.

 

 

So the amplifier has both wifi as an ethernet connection. It also has multiple HDMI connections. 7 in, hardly used and 2 out (monitor ARC & monitor2)

 

Would be very helpful to get the right advice on how to connect this to the TV for surround.

 

 

It's best to bypass the TV for sound altogether. The TV will usually have an optical out, but this limits what formats are supported.

 

 

 

 

Just when I thought I was nearly there....I am lost again lol.

 

I want to really try and keep the amp out of the lounge. But from what you are saying it is better to have it close to the tv. I will give that some thoughts.

 

As for Netflix, this comes with the tv now days right. I mean the app is in the tv? Cant this work side by side with Vero?




16 posts

Geek


  # 2150253 24-Dec-2018 21:55
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Synology , Vero 4k+, UHD TV, Marantz.

 

So this is basically what I seem to be needing.

 

 

 

How do I set this up and can I use other apps like Netflix and use SKY TV? (alternatives to  sky tv to watch tv channels are welcome)


961 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2150339 25-Dec-2018 07:56
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Pinpoint:

 

Synology , Vero 4k+, UHD TV, Marantz.

 

So this is basically what I seem to be needing.

 

How do I set this up and can I use other apps like Netflix and use SKY TV? (alternatives to  sky tv to watch tv channels are welcome)

 

 

You can run apps on your smart TV, provided you also connect that to the network.

 

A possible setup would be as follows...

 

Ethernet connections (to router/switch): Vero, NAS and TV.

 

HDMI connections (to receiver): Vero (HDMI in), Sky (HDMI in), TV (HDMI in or another audio-only input), TV (HDMI out).

 

The TV is connected both in and out, so you can get sound from live television or built-in apps via the TV.

 

To watch Sky or the Vero, select the Sky or Vero input on the receiver, and the receiver input on the TV. To watch Netflix or use apps with the sound system, select the TV input on the receiver and use the apps on the TV.

 

YMMV, depending on unknown factors, but the above should give you an idea of what needs to connect to what.

 

EDIT: You could also start without the Vero, and just install Kodi on an Android TV, upgrading later if you need something better.


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