Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 
3460 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 505


  Reply # 2151227 27-Dec-2018 19:16
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

I will add, Dolby and DTS are available in the following formats... there are many more, I just can't be stuffed typing them all out.

 

 

 

Dolby (lossy) and typically found on DVD's / some Blu-ray discs.

 

 

 

Dolby Digital + Found on apps like Netflix etc.

 

To get the multi-channel benefits of this you'll need to be connecting via HDMI cable directly into your AVR (not via ARC).

 

It will become increasingly popular as it isn't as bandwidth intensive... ideal for streaming services.

 

 

 

Dolby True HD (Lossless and not available via optical or ARC)

 

You're only getting this when you plug a Blu-ray / streamer that supports the format directly into your AVR or Dolby TrueHD compatible soundbar via HDMI. Note, this is connecting straight from the source, into the amp/soundbar... it's not ARC.

 

With a Blu-ray player you will need to turn the HDMI audio output to 'bitstream' and have secondary audio turned off, with your streaming device or TV you will again need to ensure your audio output it set to bitstream (or whatever your TV / streaming box offers).

 

 

 

Dolby ATMOS (Lossless and not available via optical or ARC)

 

You're only getting this when you plug a Blu-ray / streamer that supports the format directly into your AVR or Dolby ATMOS compatible soundbar via HDMI. Note, this is connecting straight from the source, into the amp/soundbar... it's not ARC.

 

With a Blu-ray player you will need to turn the HDMI audio output to 'bitstream' and have secondary audio turned off, with your streaming device or TV you will again need to ensure your audio output it set to bitstream (or whatever your TV / streaming box offers).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DTS (lossy) and typically found on DVD's / some Blu-ray discs.

 

 

 

DTS Master HD (Lossless and not available via optical or ARC)

 

You're only getting this when you plug a Blu-ray / streamer that supports the format directly into your AVR or DTS MAster HD compatible soundbar via HDMI. Note, this is connecting straight from the source, into the amp/soundbar... it's not ARC.

 

With a Blu-ray player you will need to turn the HDMI audio output to 'bitstream' and have secondary audio turned off, with your streaming device or TV you will again need to ensure your audio output it set to bitstream (or whatever your TV / streaming box offers).

 

 

 

DTS : X (Lossless and not available via optical or ARC)

 

You're only getting this when you plug a Blu-ray / streamer that supports the format directly into your AVR or DTS:X compatible soundbar via HDMI. Note, this is connecting straight from the source, into the amp/soundbar... it's not ARC.

 

With a Blu-ray player you will need to turn the HDMI audio output to 'bitstream' and have secondary audio turned off, with your streaming device or TV you will again need to ensure your audio output it set to bitstream (or whatever your TV / streaming box offers).

 

 

 

To confuse things even further... there is a new tech on the way called eARC. However it's largely unsupported in most TV's and not available in a majority of the new receivers on the market (only a handful at this point and certainly not on legacy products)... more 2018 receivers will get updates to receive this compatibility though. I don't know many TV's that will get the update whatsoever though...

 

I haven't heard of any soundbars that support eARC either.

 

The benefit of eARC?

 

It can take Bitstream Audio via ARC! Sweet!

 

What's more, it doesn't actually require the troublesome CEC protocol at all - win!

 

Still, to the OP, you don't have eARC... so don't go looking to try and turn it on your soundbar, it'll be another bit of hair pulling.




41 posts

Geek
+1 received by user: 3


  Reply # 2151268 28-Dec-2018 06:22
Send private message quote this post

Dunnersfella:

 

 

 

Dolby Digital + Found on apps like Netflix etc.

 

To get the multi-channel benefits of this you'll need to be connecting via HDMI cable directly into your AVR (not via ARC).

 

It will become increasingly popular as it isn't as bandwidth intensive... ideal for streaming services.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the further info, looks like you certainly know your AV!

From what I am understanding from your post is that Dolby Digital would be the best my system can deliver at the moment (If I am using Netflix) as its just the Sony Bravia 9500f and the Sony Sound bar Sony Ht-S100f with only one HDMI port. But you mention it must be connected via HDMI to the AVR not the ARC on the TV? at the risk of sounding stupid, what is an AVR? is it something I will have to buy?

 

If it is some type of external enhancement device which may cost a bit then I dont think ill bother, in which case with just the TV and Sound bar in my setup I would be just as well off with the optical cable as I am with the HDMI cable in the ARC port on the TV?

 

 

 

Thanks again for your help!


 
 
 
 


3460 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 505


  Reply # 2151328 28-Dec-2018 09:45
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

An AVR is an abbreviation for an Audio Visual Receiver, which also goes by the name of a 'receiver' an 'amp' and a 'theatre receiver'...

 

The hobby is confusing at the best of times.

 

 

 

Basically, if you connect your soundbar via optical to your TV - you will get the same quality Dolby or DTS audio as you would if you connect it via ARC. However, ARC can be flakey for many, hence the recommendation that it will not necessarily work well for you moving forward. It might, but it also might not.

 

 

 

As an aside...

 

Most people who spend a decent length of time mucking around with AV gear will end up using some sort of smart remote that allows you to turn things on / off in a specific order, always choose your preferred settings and not have to deal with ARC and it's CEC inflicted issues.

 

But that's more money.


2524 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1186

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 2153433 2-Jan-2019 18:30
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

blakamin:

 

If they're both sony, turn on bravia link, use one remote, and use optical...

 

 

Thanks for this - have done so and am now successfully on single remote.


2524 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1186

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 2153891 3-Jan-2019 14:50
Send private message quote this post

dafman:

 

blakamin:

 

If they're both sony, turn on bravia link, use one remote, and use optical...

 

 

Thanks for this - have done so and am now successfully on single remote.

 

 

Simplified my set up today.

 

Earlier, when trying to get ARC to work, I'd reduced HDMI cables on the TV to a single cable to the soundbar, with my WDTV Live and DVD player connected into the soundbar HDMI in. Which was fine, but it did require using two remotes if I wanted to use the WDTV or DVD as I had to use the soundbar remote to swap between soundbar inputs.

 

Now I am using the optical, I've moved the WDTV and DVD back to the TV HDMI in - and with Bravia sync linking the TV and soundbar for sound, I can now ditch the soundbar remote for good. Which begs the question, why would anyone bother with ARC in the first place (even if you could get it to work) - what's the advantage over optical?


628 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 175

Trusted

  Reply # 2153937 3-Jan-2019 16:10
Send private message quote this post

ARC 'it just works"

Power on/off with TV
Volume control with TV
One remote
Sends audio data from internal app sources
Is a potential extra source for hdmi inputs.

My soundbar can pair bluetooth headphones so that works too.

Can work multi brand eg lg to Sony or Samsung to sonos.

It's worked fine for me since day one so I've never tried optical.




Voice gives context

3460 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 505


  Reply # 2153964 3-Jan-2019 16:52
Send private message quote this post

ARC - it can sometimes work...

 

If it always worked, everyone would be using it.

 

Some people get a brilliant result.

 

Others can't get it to work, ever.

 

I have had it working in my house, but after my TV received a firmware update (Panasonic S60 plasma / Sony PS4 Pro) it failed to work ever again.

 

It's the spare room TV, so I don't particularly care... but it highlights what can happen... everything is sweet, then one connected products gets a firmware update that breaks the compatibility and you can be stuck, up a creek, without any sound.

 

Optical will work for whatever brand is required, it'll work after a firmware update and it'll continue to work.

 

Plus optical is capable of 5.1 lossy audio.

 

ARC is capable of 2.0 audio.

 

If you have a stereo soundbar, sweet... if you have a 5.1 system, not so sweet... although, a lot of people believe that simulated surround sound or all channel stereo (yaaay - news readers voices coming from behind me, as well as in-front) is what they should be getting at all times... so yeah.


1 | 2 
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Geekzone Live »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.