Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




7 posts

Wannabe Geek


Topic # 53751 12-Dec-2009 22:16
Send private message

Hi all,


I'm looking for some advice on a home theater system. I don't have a system at the moment and am basically starting from scratch. I have been seriously looking at the Panasonic SC-BT207GN9K and hooking it up to my old 25" Sony Triniton (i plan to upgrade this too, to a full HD projector when the budget allows). The price is around $1799.00 which is in my budget of $1800 - just!. One of the main reasons it appeals is that it is a package and seems to do everything i want. On the other hand, what would i get for the same budget out of a component system? Is that a better way to go? I guess one of my biggest concerns is the quality of the speakers and the sound they will produce. I would be interested to hear what people think. Thanks in advance.

View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
1464 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 41

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 281895 13-Dec-2009 09:26
Send private message

If I was you I would be looking at one of the packages on this page:

http://www.jbhifi.co.nz/home-theatre/systems/


The Pioneer or Onkyo/KEF packages would be at least as good as the Panasonic unit you mentioned and would provide far more options in terms of upgrades, especially if you are going to add a projector or HD TV later.

The only thing they don't have is the blu-ray player but you could purchase a seperate unit and still be on budget, or if you went for the Onkyo/KEF package you could add in a PS3 and have gaming/blu-ray/media player all covered.

561 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 62


  Reply # 281898 13-Dec-2009 09:57
Send private message

I would consider saving a bit longer and finding a good amplifier & speaker package. Those all-in-one kits usually lack what you're concerned about the most - sound quality.

 
 
 
 


481 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 5


  Reply # 281911 13-Dec-2009 11:16
Send private message

Home Theatre in a Box packages have their pros and cons. Their sound quality doesn't match that of a well-thought out component system, but to be fair they are generally cheaper than a comparable component system. Most of the leading HTiB systems have wireless rear speakers which can be a real convenience, trying to incorporate that feature into a component system is a real headache and a significant additional cost. The big drawback of HTiB systems is the lack of HDMI inputs, meaning that you can't easily hook-up other sources of 5.1 sound like a Freeview|HD set-top box or a HTPC - the only exception that I am aware of is the LG HB954WA, and that offers two HDMI inputs as well as it's included Blu-Ray source.

217 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 2


  Reply # 282262 14-Dec-2009 13:00
Send private message

I'd be inclined to get a receiver and a pair of decent front speakers, then add to it from there as budget allows. You can easily add a sub to turn the stereo into a 2.1 system, then add a center and surrounds later on. IMHO, you'll find TV and movies much better with a decent pair of stereo speakers than with a crummy 5.1 set-in-a-box

Last season's model run-out receivers are a good way of getting a decent receiver more cheaply than the current models, and unless you're really planning on pushing the system you'll usually find that the run-out models do everything you need. That gives you some more to spend on speakers :)



7 posts

Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 282449 14-Dec-2009 19:33
Send private message

Thanks for the feedback guys. It is much appreciated. I have started looking into a receiver/speaker options as suggested. Are there any good review site i should have a look at? I would like to cut the field down into small number and then go check them out for their sound. Thanks again.

Infrastructure Geek
4043 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 193

Trusted
Microsoft NZ
Subscriber

  Reply # 282501 15-Dec-2009 00:25
Send private message

grab a couple of your favourite cd's and dvd's and head into a store and try a few systems out. ideally the store(s) will have the systems set up in some sort of listening room. you'll quickly get a feel for the different sound out of different systems and be able to decide if an all-in-one will suit or whether you need to spend a lot more on a component system. if you've had nothing before then you might find that an all-in-one is a huge step up and sufficient at half the price.... the panasonic system you mentioned is at the high end of the all-in-one systems though - as marmel pointed out there are some component/speaker package deals out there in that price range. i'd be shocked if you actually bought one for $1800 though... a quick google turns one up for $100 cheaper than that at magness benrow and you can probably haggle more on the price




Technical Evangelist
Microsoft NZ
about.me/nzregs
Twitter: @nzregs


17038 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2032

Trusted

  Reply # 282504 15-Dec-2009 01:12
Send private message

http://www.jbhifi.co.nz/home-theatre/systems/
there is one for $1892 ...

2584 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5

Mod Emeritus
Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 282520 15-Dec-2009 06:13
Send private message

There is also a component pioneer system on that page for $1500. Looks like a good place to go to and have a listen.







Media centre PC - Case Silverstone LC16M with 2 X 80mm AcoustiFan DustPROOF, MOBO Gigabyte MA785GT-UD3H, CPU AMD X2 240 under volted, RAM 4 Gig DDR3 1033, HDD 120Gig System/512Gig data, Tuners 2 X Hauppauge HVR-3000, 1 X HVR-2200, Video Palit GT 220, Sound Realtek 886A HD (onboard), Optical LiteOn DH-401S Blue-ray using TotalMedia Theatre Power Corsair VX Series, 450W ATX PSU OS Windows 7 x64

1968 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 331

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 282541 15-Dec-2009 08:21
Send private message

buzzy: I'd be inclined to get a receiver and a pair of decent front speakers, then add to it from there as budget allows. You can easily add a sub to turn the stereo into a 2.1 system, then add a center and surrounds later on. IMHO, you'll find TV and movies much better with a decent pair of stereo speakers than with a crummy 5.1 set-in-a-box

Last season's model run-out receivers are a good way of getting a decent receiver more cheaply than the current models, and unless you're really planning on pushing the system you'll usually find that the run-out models do everything you need. That gives you some more to spend on speakers :)


I would have to agree. Buy a decent reciever that will last a good 5-6 years and a pair of fronts to match then slowly build up the rest. Thats how I did it anyways.




When you live your life on Twitter and Facebook, and are only friends with like minded people on Twitter and Facebook, you are not living in the real world. You are living in a narcissistic echo chamber.

 


My thoughts are my own and are in no way representative of my employer.


Infrastructure Geek
4043 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 193

Trusted
Microsoft NZ
Subscriber

  Reply # 282652 15-Dec-2009 12:46
Send private message

geekiegeek:
I would have to agree. Buy a decent reciever that will last a good 5-6 years and a pair of fronts to match then slowly build up the rest. Thats how I did it anyways.


my $2000 HT receiver was out-of-date in less than a couple of years due to the introduction of HDMI/HDMI switching and HD audio (DTS-HD, TrueHD etc).  if you're really that into HiFi/Home Theatre, sound quality and features you really can't expect your tech to last that long. 

Also, with only two front teeth you're missing out on the surround experience which kind of cancels the point of having a home theatre amp in the first place.

Dont buy a receiver + two speakers if you're looking for the home theatre experience - get a surround package of some sort complete with sub.  All in one, or component-based.

Personally, I have Onkyo amp and KEF speaker system - but some friends with all-in-one's have setups that dont sound too bad at all.




Technical Evangelist
Microsoft NZ
about.me/nzregs
Twitter: @nzregs


6449 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 493

Trusted

  Reply # 282658 15-Dec-2009 13:00
Send private message

Agree with Regs. If you're after music first and foremost, then a good amp and front two speakers is fine, but if you're after surround sound, well you just really should have some speakers surrounding you.

In my opinion the most important speaker in home theatre is the centre channel so you can hear the dialogue properly. After that it's the front two and a good sub woofer tied and then the surrounds.

The advice here is all right, all good and valid points and there is no right and wrong with this. Depending on you, and what you want, an all in one system may suit your needs fine so don't be put off at least trying a few out to see what you like.

My experience with home theatre in a box stuff has not been that great. It can be difficult to hear the dialouge properly and the bass driver has to go higher (in frequency) than it really should to compensate for the tiny speakers. This has led to lots of boomy bass but no real deep bass.

$1800 is heaps to play with these days, especially entering the Christmas period too.

291 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  Reply # 282686 15-Dec-2009 13:33
Send private message

I definitely recommend that you go the separate components route.

I've had several Yamaha a/v receiver - amps over the years, and all have been very good. I still happily use my current (older) models without HDMI inputs, as I still get great sound from Dolby Digital/DTS. 


My next upgrade will be a newer av amp with HDMI inputs - in a year or two. You should be able to get a good entry level av amp, with HDMI inputs, from the likes of JB Hi-Fi - or even TradeMe if you are careful. (I bought one of my Yamaha amps off TM - new, and it has been fine.)

Get good speakers, and for the mains - I reckon you get the best results from physically large speakers.

The thing with a component based system is that you are always tempted to keep upgrading elements of it. Which is a good thing and a bad thing:). 

And don't forget the wife/partner acceptance factor either. How the stuff looks and fits into your house is important too. 
 
Good luck with it all.





kind regards Andrew TD

6449 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 493

Trusted

  Reply # 282719 15-Dec-2009 14:43
Send private message

AndrewTD: Get good speakers, and for the mains - I reckon you get the best results from physically large speakers.
I agree with this too for front two, and centre if you can accept the look of it.

AndrewTD: And don't forget the wife/partner acceptance factor either. How the stuff looks and fits into your house is important too.
HTIB is best for this.  (Because is DVD and radio and amplifier all in one, and becaues speakers are usually tiny, -which conflicts with above speaker size comment.)

1126 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 140


  Reply # 282774 15-Dec-2009 16:34
Send private message

geekiegeek:
I would have to agree. Buy a decent reciever that will last a good 5-6 years and a pair of fronts to match then slowly build up the rest. Thats how I did it anyways.


Ditto.

If you are on a budget, get the AVR and front speakers first.

Forget all the crap about the centre speaker being the most important, it ain't.

A good pair of main speakers, properly setup will be much more enjoayble than a full set of mediocre speakers.

More is not always better.








481 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 5


  Reply # 282789 15-Dec-2009 16:51
Send private message

ilovemusic: Forget all the crap about the centre speaker being the most important, it ain't.

I'm not sure that point of view has enough detail to convince anyone.

 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Intel unveils the 8th Gen Intel Core Processor family for desktop
Posted 25-Sep-2017 19:45


Chow brothers plan to invest NZ$100 million in technology
Posted 24-Sep-2017 16:24


Symantec protects data everywhere with Information Centric Security
Posted 21-Sep-2017 15:33


FUJIFILM introduces X-E3 mirrorless camera with wireless connectivity
Posted 18-Sep-2017 13:53


Vodafone announces new plans with bigger data bundles
Posted 15-Sep-2017 10:51


Skinny launches phone with support for te reo Maori
Posted 14-Sep-2017 08:39


If Vodafone dropping mail worries you, you’re doing online wrong
Posted 11-Sep-2017 13:54


Vodafone New Zealand deploy live 400 gigabit system
Posted 11-Sep-2017 11:07


OPPO camera phones now available at PB Tech
Posted 11-Sep-2017 09:56


Norton Wi-Fi Privacy — Easy, flawed VPN
Posted 11-Sep-2017 09:48


Lenovo reveals new ThinkPad A Series
Posted 8-Sep-2017 14:37


Huawei passes Apple for the first time to capture the second spot globally
Posted 8-Sep-2017 10:45


Vodafone initiative enhances te reo Maori pronunciation on Google Maps
Posted 8-Sep-2017 10:40


Voyager Internet expand local internet phone services company with Conversant acquisition
Posted 6-Sep-2017 18:27


NOW Expands in to Tauranga
Posted 5-Sep-2017 18:16



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.