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  #751252 26-Jan-2013 17:54
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As posted earlier 5uSec/km

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  #751257 26-Jan-2013 17:58
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cyril7: As posted earlier 5uSec/km

Cyril


Thanks, also it would seem intuitive (to me at least) that the speed of electricity would be slower (than the speed of light) through copper cables along the way.




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  #751259 26-Jan-2013 18:08
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I follow a great channel on YouTube called periodic videos and i remember watching one about this question a while back. From what i remember the data/light actually slows down as it goes and is then boosted back up to speed every now and then with some sort of special conductor made of a rare metal. So I guess that would slow it down too.

Also I think electricity travels at the speed of light in a perfect setting. Super cooled conductors can get pretty close.

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  #751263 26-Jan-2013 18:22
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RunningMan:
freitasm: It takes the light around 35ms to travel between Auckland and Los Angeles. Round trip is 70ms.

Add to this from your home to the ISP, then from Los Angeles to whatever place the server you want to reach is located, then take in consideration the server load and pretty much you won't get less than 100ms to USA from New Zealand.


And that's of course assuming that whatever medium transports the signal takes the shortest straight line route, and there's no other devices like repeaters or similar that artificially increase the length...


Some interesting info

Microwaves faster than fibre optics


Why microwaves? Is the speed of light too slow, as traders have complained? The Journal reports that microwaves take 4.25 milliseconds to travel between New York and Chicago, beating the 6.55 milliseconds for infrared light traveling through a fibre-optic cable, attributing the difference to more bends in the cable. 

That's not quite right. Both light and microwaves are electromagnetic waves, so they should travel at the cosmic speed limit of about 300,000 kilometres per second. At that speed, they should take only about 4 milliseconds to make the 1200-kilometre journey between Chicago and New York. 

But that universal speed limit occurs when electromagnetic waves move through a vacuum - they travel more slowly through materials. Light signals travel through the glass core of an optical fibre at about 200,000 kilometres per second. By contrast microwaves go through air, which barely slows them down at all. In the world of high stakes flash trading, even that small difference adds up to big money.


Who knows, maybe one day fibre-optics will be too slow.


 

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  #751543 27-Jan-2013 17:17
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Klipspringer:
RunningMan:
freitasm: It takes the light around 35ms to travel between Auckland and Los Angeles. Round trip is 70ms.

Add to this from your home to the ISP, then from Los Angeles to whatever place the server you want to reach is located, then take in consideration the server load and pretty much you won't get less than 100ms to USA from New Zealand.


And that's of course assuming that whatever medium transports the signal takes the shortest straight line route, and there's no other devices like repeaters or similar that artificially increase the length...


Some interesting info

Microwaves faster than fibre optics


Why microwaves? Is the speed of light too slow, as traders have complained? The Journal reports that microwaves take 4.25 milliseconds to travel between New York and Chicago, beating the 6.55 milliseconds for infrared light traveling through a fibre-optic cable, attributing the difference to more bends in the cable. 

That's not quite right. Both light and microwaves are electromagnetic waves, so they should travel at the cosmic speed limit of about 300,000 kilometres per second. At that speed, they should take only about 4 milliseconds to make the 1200-kilometre journey between Chicago and New York. 

But that universal speed limit occurs when electromagnetic waves move through a vacuum - they travel more slowly through materials. Light signals travel through the glass core of an optical fibre at about 200,000 kilometres per second. By contrast microwaves go through air, which barely slows them down at all. In the world of high stakes flash trading, even that small difference adds up to big money.


Who knows, maybe one day fibre-optics will be too slow.


 


I wonder if the microwave link is faster because the total distance between Chicago and New York is somewhat shorter via MW link than it is by fibre? The article doesn't say which route is the shortest.




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  #751556 27-Jan-2013 17:37
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The other thing you are forgetting is that ICMP traffic might get kicked down the ranks in terms of telecoms QoS. Just because your icmp packets takes a long time to return. Doesn't mean your tcp packets are taking as long to do a trip.

I had a boarder who was a gamer and was constantly moaning about his ping times being slow. I constantly told him that one, it isn't a true representation of what his tcp packets are doing and two, i dont care.

What Ragnor has suggested will do speed things up. Also the fact you are on conklin is going to slow things down. Maybe there is a wireless provider in your area that can give you a better quality connection.

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  #751568 27-Jan-2013 17:52
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DarthKermit:
I wonder if the microwave link is faster because the total distance between Chicago and New York is somewhat shorter via MW link than it is by fibre? The article doesn't say which route is the shortest.


From an earlier post:


Light signals travel through the glass core of an optical fibre at about 200,000 kilometres per second. By contrast microwaves go through air, which barely slows them down at all. In the world of high stakes flash trading, even that small difference adds up to big money.

 
 
 
 


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  #751636 27-Jan-2013 20:34
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Light signals travel through the glass core of an optical fibre at about 200,000 kilometres per second. By contrast microwaves go through air, which barely slows them down at all. In the world of high stakes flash trading, even that small difference adds up to big money.


That's assuming that the figures quoted in that article are correct. I don't know if they are or not.




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  #751663 27-Jan-2013 21:18
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DarthKermit:

Light signals travel through the glass core of an optical fibre at about 200,000 kilometres per second. By contrast microwaves go through air, which barely slows them down at all. In the world of high stakes flash trading, even that small difference adds up to big money.


That's assuming that the figures quoted in that article are correct. I don't know if they are or not.


Its definitely correct. 
Here is an article from Aviat Networks that specializes in low latency microwave solutions.

http://www.aviatnetworks.com/solutions/low-latency-microwave/

In High Frequency Trading (HFT) applications where computers can make millions of decisions in fractions of a second, receiving data even a single millisecond sooner can equate to a distinct advantage and generate significant profits.According to Information Week Magazine¹: “A one (1) millisecond advantage in trading applications can be worth $100 million a year to a major brokerage firm”. Currently electronic trading makes between 60% and 70% of daily volume of NYSE¹. Tabb Group, a research firm, estimated that High-frequency traders generated about $21 billion in 2008.

Microwave signals travel through the air about 50% faster than light through optical fiber. Latency in a data communications circuit, or the time difference between sending a request for data and receiving the reply, will consequently be longer over a fiber circuit than a microwave circuit of the exact same length.
  • Latency is largely a function of the speed of light, which is 299,792,458 meters/second in vacuum. Microwave signals travel through the air at approximately the same speed as light through a vacuum and will have a latency of approximately 5.4 microseconds for every mile of path length. Light travel in optical fiber has latency of 8.01 microseconds for every mile of cable, due to the refraction in the fiber. When data has to travel over 1400 miles from Chicago to New York and back again the latency difference due to the communications medium alone is more than 3.5 milliseconds.




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  #752587 29-Jan-2013 12:43
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The obvious answer is to put game servers in Hawaii!




“I do not think there is any thrill that can go through the human heart like that felt by the inventor as he sees some creation of the brain unfolding to success... Such emotions make a man forget food, sleep, friends, love, everything.” - Nikola Tesla

 


Disclaimer: Views expressed in my posts do not necessarily reflect those views of my employer.



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  #752594 29-Jan-2013 12:47
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quakeguy: The obvious answer is to put game servers in Hawaii!


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