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  Reply # 885355 27-Aug-2013 15:20
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timmmay: Curious what you do that can't be done on ADSL but requires fibre? Not having a go, just curious.


No problems, I provide offsite data backups for some of my customers servers. Trying to do this for a week over an ADSL connection, especially since we were only able to get about a 10-12MB download speed on our old ADSL2 connection before switching to fibre, just wouldn't be feasible.

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  Reply # 885368 27-Aug-2013 15:33
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Sounds like something that you should look into putting into a data centre. UFB should be fast enough, but power cuts, domestic uptime of a UFB connection, that sort of thing would reduce the uptime and reliability. You'd need a UPS and redundant connections if you really want to provide a super reliable connection.




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  Reply # 885379 27-Aug-2013 15:54
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timmmay: Sounds like something that you should look into putting into a data centre. UFB should be fast enough, but power cuts, domestic uptime of a UFB connection, that sort of thing would reduce the uptime and reliability. You'd need a UPS and redundant connections if you really want to provide a super reliable connection.


We're getting a bit off-topic, but that depends on the service level required. He's already said a few hours or even a day outage for swapover would be fine, so I suspect he's doing second or third level backups, and that they're not SLA'd to require continuous availability. I have a NAS mirror into another NAS in a neighbouring building, which is also near-time synced offsite (way off-site), and a daily tape backup taken to yet another site. So if the offsite backup went down for a bit, well, it wouldn't be the end of the world. It's there to allow near-zero loss restoration in the instance that a localised event damages both the primary & secondary NAS (given they're in buildings relatively close, it is possible). But worst case, if both NASes are out, and the offsite backups out, there's last night's tape...




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  Reply # 885382 27-Aug-2013 15:58
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timmmay: Sounds like something that you should look into putting into a data centre. UFB should be fast enough, but power cuts, domestic uptime of a UFB connection, that sort of thing would reduce the uptime and reliability. You'd need a UPS and redundant connections if you really want to provide a super reliable connection.


We do have full data redundancy as well as UPS on all equipment. While we don't have redundant connections this isn't an issue for the service that we are providing as this is a secondary backup service. As for UFB uptime, we have had it running for about 14 months so far and only had 1 outage which lasted for maybe 20 minutes.

Storing backups in a datacentre has the issue of, if you need to restore an entire server 100GB+ then downloading this in a short time frame is out of the question so requires physically visiting the datacentre and downloading a copy to a USB drive which is also going to take time.

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