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202 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 23


  Reply # 867093 27-Jul-2013 16:31
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sbiddle:
Kirdog:
But internal ISP network in NZ for users will be cool, tv shows downloading, gaming, exchanging without piracy. But with ADSLs and assymetric connections its not possible at all.

Also i'm completely sure, that NZ ISP will not support this amount of traffic for IPTV, networks are not ready for it and southern cross cable(international internet link for NZ) at capacity limit now.


Every mass market last mile technology is asymmetrical - whether this be ADSL2+, VDSL2 or GPON UFB services. SXC is also nowhere near capacity, and it is pretty much a moot point anyway as a service such as Netflix launching in NZ would be hosted by a global CDN, which would probably be hosted in Sydney. Capacity to Australia isn't a problem, especially with the new cable being built.


From Sydney - yes no problem. 

i'm agree with you that last mile is assymetric, but in Russia its not, 97% lines is symmetric. Thats why for me its different.
But still freaking 700kpbs upload for me is a pain, i have started record action video with camera on my bike, and i have started upload it to video services, and what i had: errors, delays, 40 hours wait time for upload just one medium quality video.... Thats why i stopped any records, because its not suitable for me. 

Now i'm looking for solution, but can't found any.  

If i will run the new thick cable to the closest Chorus cabinet, do the will connect it or not? (In Russia, we can do it, and its not a problem for any ISP) Anyone know the answer? 





Sorry about my English guys :>

6434 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1571


  Reply # 867095 27-Jul-2013 16:34
Send private message

Kirdog:
sbiddle:
Kirdog:
But internal ISP network in NZ for users will be cool, tv shows downloading, gaming, exchanging without piracy. But with ADSLs and assymetric connections its not possible at all.

Also i'm completely sure, that NZ ISP will not support this amount of traffic for IPTV, networks are not ready for it and southern cross cable(international internet link for NZ) at capacity limit now.


Every mass market last mile technology is asymmetrical - whether this be ADSL2+, VDSL2 or GPON UFB services. SXC is also nowhere near capacity, and it is pretty much a moot point anyway as a service such as Netflix launching in NZ would be hosted by a global CDN, which would probably be hosted in Sydney. Capacity to Australia isn't a problem, especially with the new cable being built.


From Sydney - yes no problem. 

i'm agree with you that last mile is assymetric, but in Russia its not, 97% lines is symmetric. Thats why for me its different.
But still freaking 700kpbs upload for me is a pain, i have started record action video with camera on my bike, and i have started upload it to video services, and what i had: errors, delays, 40 hours wait time for upload just one medium quality video.... Thats why i stopped any records, because its not suitable for me. 

Now i'm looking for solution, but can't found any.  

If i will run the new thick cable to the closest Chorus cabinet, do the will connect it or not? (In Russia, we can do it, and its not a problem for any ISP) Anyone know the answer? 



97%????

I'd love to see a source for that claim, since it sounds like a load of rubbish to me.


It annoys me when people spread misinformation, whether intentionally or by accident


http://www.public.site1.mirror2.phi.emarketer.com/Article/Broadband-Penetration-Increases-Connections-Still-Weak-Russia/1009032

Russia’s broadband market has seen solid growth in the past few years. eMarketer estimates that the number of fixed broadband households reached 11.9 million in 2011, and is expected to increase 8.6% to 12.9 million in 2012. By the end of this year, a quarter of all Russian households will be wired with broadband, including cable modem, digital subscriber line (DSL), fiber and wireless/satellite technologies.



eMarketer estimates that growth rates will begin to level off to the single digits this year, however, and total fixed broadband households will reach 15.7 million in 2016 for a penetration of just over 30%. Subscription growth will also level off, increasing from 13.6 million in 2011 to 18.7 million in 2016.

Russian management consulting firm J’son & Partners was much more bullish on broadband subscriptions. In its March 2012 report on fixed access network technologies, the firm estimated there were 21.7 million households with broadband in 2011, for a penetration of 39%. The broadband household figure is expected to reach 32 million by 2015.

However, Russia’s broadband has some catching up to do in terms of technology. J’son & Partners wrote that most broadband connections were asymmetric digital subscriber lines (ADSL), an older technology that is common worldwide and limits connection speeds. According to the report, fiber connections, prevalent in advanced markets like the US, Japan and South Korea, accounted for only 0.5% of total subscriptions in Russia.

For consumers to embrace broadband and see adoption rates rise, Russia needs better infrastructure and widespread fiber deployment. But in such a geographically vast country, fiber connections are likely a prohibitively expensive investment.


Read more at http://www.public.site1.mirror2.phi.emarketer.com/Article/Broadband-Penetration-Increases-Connections-Still-Weak-Russia/1009032#viCaQ6lFspqkVtY7.99



By comparison NZ has a household penetration rate of somewhere between 65 and 70 percent, over double what Russia has.
And the notion that Russia has widespread fibre deployment is also a load of rubbish. Yes in the very built up rich urban centres where population is closely packed together you get good broadband, but elsewhere you don't.

202 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 23


  Reply # 867127 27-Jul-2013 17:29
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NonprayingMantis:
Kirdog:
sbiddle:
Kirdog:
But internal ISP network in NZ for users will be cool, tv shows downloading, gaming, exchanging without piracy. But with ADSLs and assymetric connections its not possible at all.

Also i'm completely sure, that NZ ISP will not support this amount of traffic for IPTV, networks are not ready for it and southern cross cable(international internet link for NZ) at capacity limit now.


Every mass market last mile technology is asymmetrical - whether this be ADSL2+, VDSL2 or GPON UFB services. SXC is also nowhere near capacity, and it is pretty much a moot point anyway as a service such as Netflix launching in NZ would be hosted by a global CDN, which would probably be hosted in Sydney. Capacity to Australia isn't a problem, especially with the new cable being built.


From Sydney - yes no problem. 

i'm agree with you that last mile is assymetric, but in Russia its not, 97% lines is symmetric. Thats why for me its different.
But still freaking 700kpbs upload for me is a pain, i have started record action video with camera on my bike, and i have started upload it to video services, and what i had: errors, delays, 40 hours wait time for upload just one medium quality video.... Thats why i stopped any records, because its not suitable for me. 

Now i'm looking for solution, but can't found any.  

If i will run the new thick cable to the closest Chorus cabinet, do the will connect it or not? (In Russia, we can do it, and its not a problem for any ISP) Anyone know the answer? 



97%????

I'd love to see a source for that claim, since it sounds like a load of rubbish to me.


It's all symmetric due to the internet development history. 

In 1998-2002 was a start of internet introducing in our country, in central parts (Moscow, Saint Petersburg and other central cities) with first internet connections people start to make websites, file hostings, small forums-social networks and etc, and they host it from homes with home servers and even small clusters. After some time when they get some profit from their services, this people start developing local networks like: connecting 10-20 buildings(apartment buildings) together and some houses. SOME ISPs have started to support this, and started to build ethernet networks for them (with speeds 10/10, then 100/100 later and etc),.  Some ISPs didn't support it, and this guys start to developing their own networks from scratch by itself (buying traffic from main cable builders, which building fibre links between cities and regions) and now they becomes in huge independent ISPs (some of them are successful and some of them are doggy). 

Examples (NOT AN ADVERTISMENT):
http://www.inetvl.ru/tarifs/ 
http://nag.ru/provider/94-moskva/51813-ekotelekom.html
http://www.vladlink.ru/internet/tarify-dlya-doma
http://www.vladtelecom.net/
http://perm.domru.ru/internet 

This and many many other providers, lists can be found here http://nag.ru/ (they can be outdated, check the official websites form the list for latest info)

95%+ of this ASPs provides gives only symmetric lines, people don't buy asymmetric lines from old telephone/landline companies, they usually provide only dsl/adsl.. connections, also with 3*higher cost (most of them supported by goverment) 

Landline phones and TV in fact are dead technology.

Average independent ISP provider.
http://nag.ru/articles/article/21479/v-gostyah-u-ufimskogo-er-telekoma.html 

In Russia if you build any website or any service, it's easier to host it from home. But now from 2012-2013 its changing little bit, after data-centers project building. 



Sorry about my terrible english :)




Sorry about my English guys :>

202 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 23


  Reply # 867133 27-Jul-2013 17:35
Send private message

NonprayingMantis:
Kirdog:
sbiddle:
Kirdog:
But internal ISP network in NZ for users will be cool, tv shows downloading, gaming, exchanging without piracy. But with ADSLs and assymetric connections its not possible at all.

Also i'm completely sure, that NZ ISP will not support this amount of traffic for IPTV, networks are not ready for it and southern cross cable(international internet link for NZ) at capacity limit now.


Every mass market last mile technology is asymmetrical - whether this be ADSL2+, VDSL2 or GPON UFB services. SXC is also nowhere near capacity, and it is pretty much a moot point anyway as a service such as Netflix launching in NZ would be hosted by a global CDN, which would probably be hosted in Sydney. Capacity to Australia isn't a problem, especially with the new cable being built.


From Sydney - yes no problem. 

i'm agree with you that last mile is assymetric, but in Russia its not, 97% lines is symmetric. Thats why for me its different.
But still freaking 700kpbs upload for me is a pain, i have started record action video with camera on my bike, and i have started upload it to video services, and what i had: errors, delays, 40 hours wait time for upload just one medium quality video.... Thats why i stopped any records, because its not suitable for me. 

Now i'm looking for solution, but can't found any.  

If i will run the new thick cable to the closest Chorus cabinet, do the will connect it or not? (In Russia, we can do it, and its not a problem for any ISP) Anyone know the answer? 



97%????

I'd love to see a source for that claim, since it sounds like a load of rubbish to me.


It annoys me when people spread misinformation, whether intentionally or by accident


http://www.public.site1.mirror2.phi.emarketer.com/Article/Broadband-Penetration-Increases-Connections-Still-Weak-Russia/1009032

Russia’s broadband market has seen solid growth in the past few years. eMarketer estimates that the number of fixed broadband households reached 11.9 million in 2011, and is expected to increase 8.6% to 12.9 million in 2012. By the end of this year, a quarter of all Russian households will be wired with broadband, including cable modem, digital subscriber line (DSL), fiber and wireless/satellite technologies.



eMarketer estimates that growth rates will begin to level off to the single digits this year, however, and total fixed broadband households will reach 15.7 million in 2016 for a penetration of just over 30%. Subscription growth will also level off, increasing from 13.6 million in 2011 to 18.7 million in 2016.

Russian management consulting firm J’son & Partners was much more bullish on broadband subscriptions. In its March 2012 report on fixed access network technologies, the firm estimated there were 21.7 million households with broadband in 2011, for a penetration of 39%. The broadband household figure is expected to reach 32 million by 2015.

However, Russia’s broadband has some catching up to do in terms of technology. J’son & Partners wrote that most broadband connections were asymmetric digital subscriber lines (ADSL), an older technology that is common worldwide and limits connection speeds. According to the report, fiber connections, prevalent in advanced markets like the US, Japan and South Korea, accounted for only 0.5% of total subscriptions in Russia.

For consumers to embrace broadband and see adoption rates rise, Russia needs better infrastructure and widespread fiber deployment. But in such a geographically vast country, fiber connections are likely a prohibitively expensive investment.


Read more at http://www.public.site1.mirror2.phi.emarketer.com/Article/Broadband-Penetration-Increases-Connections-Still-Weak-Russia/1009032#viCaQ6lFspqkVtY7.99



By comparison NZ has a household penetration rate of somewhere between 65 and 70 percent, over double what Russia has.
And the notion that Russia has widespread fibre deployment is also a load of rubbish. Yes in the very built up rich urban centres where population is closely packed together you get good broadband, but elsewhere you don't.


Read my reply, i don't care about statistics which written by some managers who don't know real technical things, i only trust to real things, what i saw, better to ask people on popular Russian forums, what type of connection they have, you will be surprised. :)




Sorry about my English guys :>

6434 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1571


  Reply # 867139 27-Jul-2013 17:41
Send private message

Kirdog:
NonprayingMantis:
Kirdog:
sbiddle:
Kirdog:
But internal ISP network in NZ for users will be cool, tv shows downloading, gaming, exchanging without piracy. But with ADSLs and assymetric connections its not possible at all.

Also i'm completely sure, that NZ ISP will not support this amount of traffic for IPTV, networks are not ready for it and southern cross cable(international internet link for NZ) at capacity limit now.


Every mass market last mile technology is asymmetrical - whether this be ADSL2+, VDSL2 or GPON UFB services. SXC is also nowhere near capacity, and it is pretty much a moot point anyway as a service such as Netflix launching in NZ would be hosted by a global CDN, which would probably be hosted in Sydney. Capacity to Australia isn't a problem, especially with the new cable being built.


From Sydney - yes no problem. 

i'm agree with you that last mile is assymetric, but in Russia its not, 97% lines is symmetric. Thats why for me its different.
But still freaking 700kpbs upload for me is a pain, i have started record action video with camera on my bike, and i have started upload it to video services, and what i had: errors, delays, 40 hours wait time for upload just one medium quality video.... Thats why i stopped any records, because its not suitable for me. 

Now i'm looking for solution, but can't found any.  

If i will run the new thick cable to the closest Chorus cabinet, do the will connect it or not? (In Russia, we can do it, and its not a problem for any ISP) Anyone know the answer? 



97%????

I'd love to see a source for that claim, since it sounds like a load of rubbish to me.


It annoys me when people spread misinformation, whether intentionally or by accident


http://www.public.site1.mirror2.phi.emarketer.com/Article/Broadband-Penetration-Increases-Connections-Still-Weak-Russia/1009032

Russia’s broadband market has seen solid growth in the past few years. eMarketer estimates that the number of fixed broadband households reached 11.9 million in 2011, and is expected to increase 8.6% to 12.9 million in 2012. By the end of this year, a quarter of all Russian households will be wired with broadband, including cable modem, digital subscriber line (DSL), fiber and wireless/satellite technologies.



eMarketer estimates that growth rates will begin to level off to the single digits this year, however, and total fixed broadband households will reach 15.7 million in 2016 for a penetration of just over 30%. Subscription growth will also level off, increasing from 13.6 million in 2011 to 18.7 million in 2016.

Russian management consulting firm J’son & Partners was much more bullish on broadband subscriptions. In its March 2012 report on fixed access network technologies, the firm estimated there were 21.7 million households with broadband in 2011, for a penetration of 39%. The broadband household figure is expected to reach 32 million by 2015.

However, Russia’s broadband has some catching up to do in terms of technology. J’son & Partners wrote that most broadband connections were asymmetric digital subscriber lines (ADSL), an older technology that is common worldwide and limits connection speeds. According to the report, fiber connections, prevalent in advanced markets like the US, Japan and South Korea, accounted for only 0.5% of total subscriptions in Russia.

For consumers to embrace broadband and see adoption rates rise, Russia needs better infrastructure and widespread fiber deployment. But in such a geographically vast country, fiber connections are likely a prohibitively expensive investment.


Read more at http://www.public.site1.mirror2.phi.emarketer.com/Article/Broadband-Penetration-Increases-Connections-Still-Weak-Russia/1009032#viCaQ6lFspqkVtY7.99



By comparison NZ has a household penetration rate of somewhere between 65 and 70 percent, over double what Russia has.
And the notion that Russia has widespread fibre deployment is also a load of rubbish. Yes in the very built up rich urban centres where population is closely packed together you get good broadband, but elsewhere you don't.


Read my reply, i don't care about statistics which written by some managers who don't know real technical things, i only trust to real things, what i saw, better to ask people on popular Russian forums, what type of connection they have, you will be surprised. :)


Anecdotes are useless. The reality is that broadband in Russia overall is not great. Sure there are pockets of fibre in the very built up areas where fttb makes sense, (I.e. getting fibre to the basement of an apartment building) but Just because you lived in an area that happened to be good, and have moved to an area of NZ where ufb and vdsl is not available, doesn't mean that NZ broadband is worse tharussian.

Ftth penetration in Russia is basically non existent.

202 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 23


  Reply # 867141 27-Jul-2013 17:51
Send private message

NonprayingMantis:
Kirdog:
NonprayingMantis:
Kirdog:
sbiddle:
Kirdog:
But internal ISP network in NZ for users will be cool, tv shows downloading, gaming, exchanging without piracy. But with ADSLs and assymetric connections its not possible at all.

Also i'm completely sure, that NZ ISP will not support this amount of traffic for IPTV, networks are not ready for it and southern cross cable(international internet link for NZ) at capacity limit now.


Every mass market last mile technology is asymmetrical - whether this be ADSL2+, VDSL2 or GPON UFB services. SXC is also nowhere near capacity, and it is pretty much a moot point anyway as a service such as Netflix launching in NZ would be hosted by a global CDN, which would probably be hosted in Sydney. Capacity to Australia isn't a problem, especially with the new cable being built.


From Sydney - yes no problem. 

i'm agree with you that last mile is assymetric, but in Russia its not, 97% lines is symmetric. Thats why for me its different.
But still freaking 700kpbs upload for me is a pain, i have started record action video with camera on my bike, and i have started upload it to video services, and what i had: errors, delays, 40 hours wait time for upload just one medium quality video.... Thats why i stopped any records, because its not suitable for me. 

Now i'm looking for solution, but can't found any.  

If i will run the new thick cable to the closest Chorus cabinet, do the will connect it or not? (In Russia, we can do it, and its not a problem for any ISP) Anyone know the answer? 



97%????

I'd love to see a source for that claim, since it sounds like a load of rubbish to me.


It annoys me when people spread misinformation, whether intentionally or by accident


http://www.public.site1.mirror2.phi.emarketer.com/Article/Broadband-Penetration-Increases-Connections-Still-Weak-Russia/1009032

Russia’s broadband market has seen solid growth in the past few years. eMarketer estimates that the number of fixed broadband households reached 11.9 million in 2011, and is expected to increase 8.6% to 12.9 million in 2012. By the end of this year, a quarter of all Russian households will be wired with broadband, including cable modem, digital subscriber line (DSL), fiber and wireless/satellite technologies.



eMarketer estimates that growth rates will begin to level off to the single digits this year, however, and total fixed broadband households will reach 15.7 million in 2016 for a penetration of just over 30%. Subscription growth will also level off, increasing from 13.6 million in 2011 to 18.7 million in 2016.

Russian management consulting firm J’son & Partners was much more bullish on broadband subscriptions. In its March 2012 report on fixed access network technologies, the firm estimated there were 21.7 million households with broadband in 2011, for a penetration of 39%. The broadband household figure is expected to reach 32 million by 2015.

However, Russia’s broadband has some catching up to do in terms of technology. J’son & Partners wrote that most broadband connections were asymmetric digital subscriber lines (ADSL), an older technology that is common worldwide and limits connection speeds. According to the report, fiber connections, prevalent in advanced markets like the US, Japan and South Korea, accounted for only 0.5% of total subscriptions in Russia.

For consumers to embrace broadband and see adoption rates rise, Russia needs better infrastructure and widespread fiber deployment. But in such a geographically vast country, fiber connections are likely a prohibitively expensive investment.


Read more at http://www.public.site1.mirror2.phi.emarketer.com/Article/Broadband-Penetration-Increases-Connections-Still-Weak-Russia/1009032#viCaQ6lFspqkVtY7.99



By comparison NZ has a household penetration rate of somewhere between 65 and 70 percent, over double what Russia has.
And the notion that Russia has widespread fibre deployment is also a load of rubbish. Yes in the very built up rich urban centres where population is closely packed together you get good broadband, but elsewhere you don't.


Read my reply, i don't care about statistics which written by some managers who don't know real technical things, i only trust to real things, what i saw, better to ask people on popular Russian forums, what type of connection they have, you will be surprised. :)


Anecdotes are useless. The reality is that broadband in Russia overall is not great. Sure there are pockets of fibre, just like there is in nz right now, but Just because you lived in an area that happened to be good, and have moved to an area of NZ where ufb and vdsl is not available, doesn't mean that NZ broadband is worse tharussian.


We dont have fibre connection in RU, all are Ethernet based. copper. 

hey! I don't mean that broadband in NZ is bad, i'm happy with everything, and everything cool, except upload speed :). SDSL for me will be much better instead ADSL xD.  Internet in NZ slower now because country far away from north, where is 97% of "global networks", everything other is cool :).

New Zealand much better country, its sad for me, but it's true, that why i'm here ;)




Sorry about my English guys :>

4031 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 867


  Reply # 867217 27-Jul-2013 21:04
Send private message

Where are you located, Kirdog?

202 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 23


  Reply # 867218 27-Jul-2013 21:09
Send private message

quickymart: Where are you located, Kirdog?


Springfield road, western springs, 1022 :>




Sorry about my English guys :>

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