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Topic # 127109 30-Jul-2013 13:01
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hi, i need advice on which Ultra Broadband package is better, when upgrading from an ADSL2+ connection. i'm looking at the 30/10 fibre as i don't think i would make use of a 100/50 fibre. plus with the reports of VDSL users getting good download speeds over 30Mbps i was wondering why go fibre for the same price point.

From the telecom page below here are the things which i can see http://www.telecom.co.nz/internet/ultrabroadband/overview/?nid=mm410

Ultra Fibre
1) same = $95/month
2) same = 80GB cap
3) CON = up to 30 Mbps download
4) same? = up to 10 Mbps upload
5) PRO = free connection with 12 month contract
6) CON = installation takes a day
7) same? = TG587 modem
8) CON = no process to transfer to different ISP

Ultra VDSL
1) same = $95/month
2) same = 80GB cap
3) PRO = between 15 and 70 Mbps download
4) same? = between 5 and 10 Mbps upload
5) CON = $99 connection fee with 12 month contract
6) PRO = installation takes 1-2 hours
7) same = TG589vn modem
8) PRO = can transfer to different ISP

can someone more knowledgeable than me explain why in non-geek terms i should choose one option over the other?

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  Reply # 868450 30-Jul-2013 13:01
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Hello... Our robot found some keywords in your post, so here is an automated reply with some important things to note regarding broadband speeds.

 



 

If you are posting regarding DSL speeds please check that

 



 

- you have reset your modem and router

 


 

- your PC (or other PCs in your LAN) is not downloading large files when you are testing

 

- you are not being throttled by your ISP due to going over the monthly cap

 


 

- your tests are always done on an ethernet connection to the router - do not use wireless for testing

 


 

- you read this topic and follow the instructions there.

 



 

Make sure you provide information for other users to help you. If you have not already done it, please EDIT your post and add this now:

 



 

- Your ISP and plan

 


 

- Type of connection (ADSL, ADSL2, VDSL)

 


 

- Your modem DSL stats (do not worry about posting Speedtest, we need sync rate, attenuation and noise margin)

 


 

- Your general location (or street)

 


 

- If you are rural or urban

 


 

- If you know your connection is to an exchange, cabinet or conklin

 


 

- If your connection is to a ULL or wholesale service

 


 

- If you have done an isolation test as per the link above

 



 

Most of the problems with speed are likely to be related to internal wiring issues. Read this discussion to find out more about this. Your ISP is not intentionally slowing you down today (unless you are on a managed plan). Also if this is the school holidays it's likely you will notice slower than usual speed due to more users online.

 



 

A master splitter is required for VDSL2 and in most cases will improve speeds on DSL connections. Regular disconnections can be a monitored alarm or a set top box trying to connect. If there's an alarm connected to your line even if you don't have an alarm contract it may still try to connect so it's worth checking.

 



 

I recommend you read these two blog posts:

 



 

- Is your premises phone wiring impacting your broadband performance? (very technical)

 


 

- Are you receiving a substandard ULL ADSL2+ connection from your ISP?




I am the Geekzone Robot and I am here to help. I am from the Internet. I do not interact. Do not expect other replies from me.



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  Reply # 868460 30-Jul-2013 13:04
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If you can get Fibre, then pretty sure you won't be allowed VDSL.


But even if you could, your VDSL speed will be highly variable depending on your distance form the cabinet/exchange. In my case I am very lucky and it is only 100m or so, so I get VDSL speeds of 40/10 roughly. but that speed drops off fairly quickly. if you are, say, 700m+ from the cabinet, then you will not see all that much improvement over ADSL for download speed.

Short answer: go for fibre, if you have a choice, which you probably don't.

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  Reply # 868470 30-Jul-2013 13:07
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  1. Different modem with Fibre

  2. Ability to jump to the 100mbit plan if needs change

  3. 30/10mbit or 100/50mbit options on Fibre

  4. VDSL is line dependent, there is no guarantees of speed

  5. Installation takes a day with both options give or take

  6. You can transfer to another ISP with both options, or enable another ISP on a different port of the ONT.

  7. $99 connection fee on VDSL covers home wiring etc, VDSL is not part of the government Fibre to the home initiative.



If Fibre is available, thy should always go to Fibre.




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  Reply # 868515 30-Jul-2013 13:47
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michaelmurfy:
If Fibre is available, thy should always go to Fibre.


Unless you have some sort of Greco-roman tiled driveway that you don't want digging up!

But UFB is the future, the minimum packet loss and lower latency it offers shouldn't be discounted.

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  Reply # 868554 30-Jul-2013 14:17
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UFB should be far more stable with lower latency





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  Reply # 868604 30-Jul-2013 15:06
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Fiber better anyway.

But it is depends on user, and what user need. But general fiber is better.




Sorry about my English guys :>

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  Reply # 869860 1-Aug-2013 12:11
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tilde:

can someone more knowledgeable than me explain why in non-geek terms i should choose one option over the other?



VDSL: Electrical signal over traditional copper phone line, connection rates vary by distance to the exchange/cabinet you're connected too and it's only available if you are relatively close to the exchange or cabinet your line is connected too (within 1km usually).

Fibre: Light over glass fibres, connection rates don't degrade over distance. Only available if the UFB project has deployed Fibre in your area.

If you can get Fibre, get it.

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  Reply # 869932 1-Aug-2013 13:30
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All UFB plans also have a high priority CIR with guaranteed bandwidth. VDSL is entirely a best effort connection.


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  Reply # 869941 1-Aug-2013 13:44
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The oft-quoted Committed Information Rate (CIR) for UFB only applies to the high priority channel which is not used for internet traffic. The reason that it cannot be used is that the Peak Information Rate (PIR) is too low. E.g. for the 30/10 plan, the PIR for High Priority traffic is only 2.5 meg, and no-one wants a UFB connection that maxes out at 2.5meg.

In the end, entirely up to the user if they want VDSL or Fibre (assuming they qualify for both). If you give Telecom a call, we can see what your likely connect rates on VDSL will look like (you can't see it online), and you can compare with Fibre.

VDSL is an easier install. Fibre is more future-ready and will support higher peak speeds.




My views are my own, and may not necessarily represent those of my employer.

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  Reply # 869942 1-Aug-2013 13:45
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At the moment basic services like a static IP and port 25 aren't available on Telecom Fibre but they are on VDSL so bear that in mind.

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  Reply # 869946 1-Aug-2013 13:52
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cbrpilot: The oft-quoted Committed Information Rate (CIR) for UFB only applies to the high priority channel which is not used for internet traffic. The reason that it cannot be used is that the Peak Information Rate (PIR) is too low. E.g. for the 30/10 plan, the PIR for High Priority traffic is only 2.5 meg, and no-one wants a UFB connection that maxes out at 2.5meg. .


It can be used for any traffic you want it to be used for, but clearly the main use is going to be VoIP services. Obviously the end user can tag any traffic they want to use the high priority queue for on the upstream, but downstream traffic in this queue is going to be limited to whatever the ISP decides they want to tag.


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  Reply # 869948 1-Aug-2013 13:59
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sbiddle:
cbrpilot: The oft-quoted Committed Information Rate (CIR) for UFB only applies to the high priority channel which is not used for internet traffic. The reason that it cannot be used is that the Peak Information Rate (PIR) is too low. E.g. for the 30/10 plan, the PIR for High Priority traffic is only 2.5 meg, and no-one wants a UFB connection that maxes out at 2.5meg. .


It can be used for any traffic you want it to be used for, but clearly the main use is going to be VoIP services. Obviously the end user can tag any traffic they want to use the high priority queue for on the upstream, but downstream traffic in this queue is going to be limited to whatever the ISP decides they want to tag.



As you say, the control is asymmetric, and thus you cannot really utilise it any way you want.  

If you change the RGW settings to tag traffic as high priority rather than low, then you will limit your speed from 30M+ down to 2.5M.

Telecom does not tag any internet traffic as high priority.




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  Reply # 869951 1-Aug-2013 14:01
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chevrolux: At the moment basic services like a static IP and port 25 aren't available on Telecom Fibre but they are on VDSL so bear that in mind.


Correct.  Those services will both be available on Fibre very very soon, however, so if you do go Fibre, you will not be long without them.




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  Reply # 870023 1-Aug-2013 14:56
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michaelmurfy: You can ... enable another ISP on a different port of the ONT.


This is something I was wondering about. Am I correct that there are 4 ethernet ports on the ONT? If so, is it possible to have 4 different 100/50 services, with separate bandwidth, through the ONT? Or is 100/50 the maximum overall speed for all services? If the 100/50 is instead shared between all services, is there any way to set your own service priority in the ONT?

Also I still don't like the idea of VOIP sharing my internet service, I'd prefer a separate service on the ONT. Is anyone doing this? If not, why not? Surely it will be a requirement to have a basic service like this available when the copper network eventually gets switched off?

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  Reply # 870026 1-Aug-2013 15:00
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PaulBags:
Also I still don't like the idea of VOIP sharing my internet service, I'd prefer a separate service on the ONT. Is anyone doing this? If not, why not? Surely it will be a requirement to have a basic service like this available when the copper network eventually gets switched off?


VoIP can be delivered to the ONT using the voice ports, or can be delivered over a internet connection using the CIR. Both deliver the same guaranteed QoS - there is absolutely no reason why you would deliver voice over an additional UNNI port.


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