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  Reply # 1663218 3-Nov-2016 11:29
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da5id:

 

Thanks for your reply. 

 

I hope it works as well in the country as it does in urban areas.

 

One area of interest - Spark told my folks that they would not have to pay the Wiring Maintenance fee because, of course, they would now be on 4G. Does this mean that if our whole area decides to switch to wireless that then nobody will be having to pay the maintenance fee and that therefore the copper wiring will not be maintained at all and will be left to completely deteriorate? 

 

Is the ultimate aim of Spark, in phoning around and talking people into switching, to decommission the copper altogether in those rural areas? 

 

 

Wiring maintenance is your internal wiring. Its a holdover from the days where only telecom could work in it in the distant past, where people would not be able to get their own technician to look at it.

 

As spark only deliver the phone line to the port on the router, anything you do after that point is your problem so no need for them to maintain the wiring. Whereas the internal wiring of a house was historically the telcos problem, and wiring maintenance was a way to keep having them look after faults on it - more like an insurance. Funny that people have no problem paying an electrician to fix their power wiring but if it is the phone wiring then it all becomes their ISP's problem and its "so unfair" that they have to pay to get it fixed.

 

Nothing to do with the copper in the ground outside or up to the house. That is choruses problem to maintain whenever a telco is buying service off them. The job they do on maintaining it is a whole different discussion however ;)





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  Reply # 1663226 3-Nov-2016 11:48
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Have been using Spark Rural Wireless Broadband since early launch about a year ago. Has been absolutely rock solid. Getting on average 80/30. peaks at 110/50. Typically less congestion on the rural sites anyway. Previous connection was ADSL getting only 4-5/1

 

You can manage the b315 using the Huawei Hi-Link app which is convenient.

 

Wifi performance was average/moderate. I use it as a modem only and WiFi is managed by two AirPort Extreme's.

 

However as an early adaptor my landline is supplied over copper still - I would imagine I will get migrated off this in the near future but Spark will need to replace my b315 to do this as the initial b315s that were supplied where not capable of voice.


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1663281 3-Nov-2016 12:34
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firefuze:

 

Have been using Spark Rural Wireless Broadband since early launch about a year ago. Has been absolutely rock solid. Getting on average 80/30. peaks at 110/50. Typically less congestion on the rural sites anyway. Previous connection was ADSL getting only 4-5/1

 

You can manage the b315 using the Huawei Hi-Link app which is convenient.

 

Wifi performance was average/moderate. I use it as a modem only and WiFi is managed by two AirPort Extreme's.

 

However as an early adaptor my landline is supplied over copper still - I would imagine I will get migrated off this in the near future but Spark will need to replace my b315 to do this as the initial b315s that were supplied where not capable of voice.

 

 

The B315 will do voice just fine, it just needs a firmware update to enable it. And that firmware should be pushed out automagically over the air or the Spark folks could email you the firmware to apply. No hardware swap required.








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  Reply # 1663303 3-Nov-2016 13:11
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firefuze:

 

Have been using Spark Rural Wireless Broadband since early launch about a year ago. Has been absolutely rock solid. Getting on average 80/30. peaks at 110/50. Typically less congestion on the rural sites anyway. Previous connection was ADSL getting only 4-5/1

 

You can manage the b315 using the Huawei Hi-Link app which is convenient.

 

Wifi performance was average/moderate. I use it as a modem only and WiFi is managed by two AirPort Extreme's.

 

However as an early adaptor my landline is supplied over copper still - I would imagine I will get migrated off this in the near future but Spark will need to replace my b315 to do this as the initial b315s that were supplied where not capable of voice.

 

 

@firefuze, thanks

 

Are you saying that there should be no problem with VOIP over their modem. Which one is the VOIP capable modem type?

 

I use the Fritzbox 7490 for the wifi/ethernet. The VOIP phone would connected to the Fritzbox in the first instance anyway, so that would not affect Sparks modem?

 

Do you know if our address would be available to emergency services, if the phone is moved from the copper( as it is now for one of our phones) to their rural broadband phone service?

 

 


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  Reply # 1663309 3-Nov-2016 13:31
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@Noig 

 

The voice and non-voice versions are identical. Both have a physical ATA port to support voice but the ATA port on the initial modems sent out simply didn't work/support it. Hence my landline is over copper currently. But this setup has a large cost to Spark paying Chorus for a line rental and as such when my 24 month term finishes they will likely force me to migrate from copper to VOIP. My B315 will have to be replaced to support this. (Also, only 12 Month terms available currently)

 

You cant get these non-voice models from Spark anymore - they only range the new model and has been that way for some time.

 

As for using the Fritzbox for VOIP I believe you will have some trouble, But I don't use VOIP services so cant really comment in much detail. I would recommend only using the ATA port on the B315. 

 

As for emergency services it is my understanding they can still determine your location - your landline number is still the same just the delivery method has changed. It is still active, directory listed (if applicable) and holds the same physical address information in Sparks systems etc.


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  Reply # 1663311 3-Nov-2016 13:31
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Spark VoIP runs over it's own APN on the Spark network delivering guaranteed QoS.

 

Running 3rd part VoIP is not supported, will have double NAT which you'd need to overcome first, and secondly will have no guaranteed QoS. Just look at threads on here from people pulling the plug on VoIP over Skinny due to issues.

 

 




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  Reply # 1663314 3-Nov-2016 13:40
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@firefuze and @sbiddle

 

Thanks a lot.

 

That is going to put the idea of 3party VOIP over Rural Wireless to rest for the foreseeable future.cry

 

Won't give up 2talk voip!laughing

 

 


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  Reply # 1663375 3-Nov-2016 15:51
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Noig:

 

@firefuze and @sbiddle

 

Thanks a lot.

 

That is going to put the idea of 3party VOIP over Rural Wireless to rest for the foreseeable future.cry

 

Won't give up 2talk voip!laughing

 

The voice quality on the B315 directly into the Spark Broadsoft core is pretty good. I've used it extensively and haven't had a problem.

 

You can now also get distinctive ring / secondary number should you want to and it all connects back to the dedicated APN with attached QoS as per Steve's post. So it should be the same as if you had copper voice with a few exceptions of special NEAX specific services that aren't available anywhere else.






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  Reply # 1663422 3-Nov-2016 18:25
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firefuze:

 

 

 

Wifi performance was average/moderate. I use it as a modem only and WiFi is managed by two AirPort Extreme's.

 

 

 

 

I have an Airport (just an Express one, I think), at the moment plugged into the Spark Thomson wired modem. How could I use the Airport in conjunction with the new 4G modem that is coming, to extend the Wi-fi area? How is yours set up?

 

 

 

Thanks.

 

 


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  Reply # 1663483 3-Nov-2016 21:25
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da5id - I'm guessing you'd just be able to plug in you Airport just like you do today into one of the ports on the back.  Here's a shot of the back of the B315, and a closeup of the ports. 

 

I've thrashed this in testing for data use - I found the internal Wifi OK, but I've only really used it in the same room, or at most the room next door.  Great throughput speeds - for a couple of weeks to test I VPN'd into work, and ran heaps of apps etc along side Skype for Business for conversing / video - and it's just great.   For day to day use, we run a reasonable number of agents at home on these also, rather than fixed wire, as they're solid and consistent performers. 

 

 


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  Reply # 1663485 3-Nov-2016 21:30
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Wheelbarrow01:

 

[Disclaimer: I work for Spark, so take my opinion with a grain of salt if you wish, but the below is my factual experience with urban fixed wireless broadband & phone]

 

Yes I am talking about the urban wireless broadband product, but I believe most of what I say below is applicable to rural wireless.

 

I have been using the Spark wireless broadband + voice product for coming up on a year (I was initially trialing it, but I ended up keeping it).

 

After a move of address I suffered very poor ADSL speeds, and fibre at that time was not available at my new address.

 

The Spark wireless product works straight out of the box, with just one phonecall required to activate it. What I particularly like is that I can place the router anywhere in the house that has a power point, and move it at will - you are not tied to a location having to have a phone jackpoint. This has been excellent for me because in the last few months I have completely changed the layout of the furniture in my lounge area a few times to try and find the best fit, and moving the router has been effortless each time.

 

I am enjoying complete freedom to stream Lightbox or Netflix whenever I want, and have never experienced a single buffering issue - the thing just works. I am not saying that it doesn't slow down during peak periods - it probably does - but I have not noticed and I'm not one to carry out a thousands speed tests a day to check it, but it hasn't been a noticeable issue for me. From memory I was getting around 40/20Mbps on the day I first connected it which is ample for my needs.

 

When I first started the trial my data limit was 80GB, which proved not to be enough once I started really getting into my streaming. Since Spark upped the cap to 120GB I have had data to spare at the end of the month. I watch up to around 2 hours of streaming most days - that's equal to 3 x 40 minute commercial free episodes.

 

The voice calls are clear, and I noticed that the lag/echo I previously experienced on toll calls to Canada made over copper have completely disappeared. The phone works in exactly the same way as it did when I was on copper, using my 5 or 6 year old Uniden DECT handset.

 

As for worrying about power cuts, I have not experienced any, and I am not really worried if I do - that's what my mobile is for. And in any case my cordless phone wouldn't work either. Or my computer.

 

I find this product so good that even though fibre is now available at my address, I really can't be bothered going through the rigmarole of getting it installed, and I'm happy to stick with the wireless product.

 

 

 

 

I don't work for Spark.  2 weeks into my urban Spark wireless broadband and I am very happy indeed with its performance (60 down, 6 up, much better than I had before) and the "wireless landline" phone system.  No problems at all (and certainly no rebooting of the modem).  I got @coffeebaron to connect the phone output to our house wiring, and now all original jacks work fine.  Spark won't do this house-wiring integration for wireless landline via 4G, only for fibre, which is a bit silly.

 

Like @wheelbarrow01, I can't be bothered to go through fibre install.





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  Reply # 1663505 3-Nov-2016 23:01
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mdav056:

 

I don't work for Spark.  2 weeks into my urban Spark wireless broadband and I am very happy indeed with its performance (60 down, 6 up, much better than I had before) and the "wireless landline" phone system.  No problems at all (and certainly no rebooting of the modem).  I got @coffeebaron to connect the phone output to our house wiring, and now all original jacks work fine.  Spark won't do this house-wiring integration for wireless landline via 4G, only for fibre, which is a bit silly.

 

Like @wheelbarrow01, I can't be bothered to go through fibre install.

 

 

 

 

Hmm.Spark doesn't do it for fibre either. The fibre company does. Spark doesnt own the copper of the fibre copper networks, thus haver no installers/technicians for that task.

 

 

 

Unsure if a fibre company/Chorus would be interested in the integration to a service that is not theirs.

 

 


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  Reply # 1663519 4-Nov-2016 00:00
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internal wiring is the customers to do what they want with as soon as it is disconnected from the chorus copper network.





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  Reply # 1663534 4-Nov-2016 07:26
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tdgeek:

 

mdav056:

 

I don't work for Spark.  2 weeks into my urban Spark wireless broadband and I am very happy indeed with its performance (60 down, 6 up, much better than I had before) and the "wireless landline" phone system.  No problems at all (and certainly no rebooting of the modem).  I got @coffeebaron to connect the phone output to our house wiring, and now all original jacks work fine.  Spark won't do this house-wiring integration for wireless landline via 4G, only for fibre, which is a bit silly.

 

Like @wheelbarrow01, I can't be bothered to go through fibre install.

 

 

 

 

Hmm.Spark doesn't do it for fibre either. The fibre company does. Spark doesnt own the copper of the fibre copper networks, thus haver no installers/technicians for that task.

 

 

 

Unsure if a fibre company/Chorus would be interested in the integration to a service that is not theirs.

 

 

 

 

The point is, you can order integrated phone wiring from Spark when you order fibre through them, but not when you order wireless broadband from them.  In the first case, Chorus, or its contractor, installs and connects, in the second case a Spark tech set it up.  Don't care much who does the work, it's the functionality that matters to the consumer, and in the wireless broadband landline case, you have to find someone else to do the integration.  Most ordinary consumers won't get this bit, and will end up with their main phone connected to the broadband modem wherever it is located, a DECT setup in their house, and their phone jacks all dead.  I would have thought that Spark could arrange wiring integration simply because they are (or used to be) into telephones!





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  Reply # 1663536 4-Nov-2016 07:29
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mdav056:

 

Spark won't do this house-wiring integration for wireless landline via 4G, only for fibre, which is a bit silly.

 

 

The householder owns the internal wiring, not Spark or Chorus. During a UFB install this process is done by Chorus or the LFC as part of the install process if requested.

 

Since nobody comes to install a fixed wireless solution they have no means of doing this, but anybody proficient in phone wiring could do this in ~10 mins providing the router is located near an existing phone jack.

 

 


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