Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


ajw



1442 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 136


Topic # 243012 23-Nov-2018 14:44
Send private message quote this post

This should reduce security concerns on 5G.

 

https://www.zdnet.com/article/huawei-and-spark-showcase-separated-5g-network-in-new-zealand/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=curated


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
563 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 185

Subscriber

  Reply # 2132764 23-Nov-2018 15:33
Send private message quote this post

Strange timing as this article was just published too (NZ Herald): US asks allies to drop Huawei

 

The US government has initiated an extraordinary outreach campaign to foreign allies, trying to persuade wireless and internet providers in these countries to avoid telecommunications equipment from Chinese company Huawei, according to a Wall Street Journal report.


ajw



1442 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 136


  Reply # 2132772 23-Nov-2018 15:36
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Benjip:

 

Strange timing as this article was just published too (NZ Herald): US asks allies to drop Huawei

 

The US government has initiated an extraordinary outreach campaign to foreign allies, trying to persuade wireless and internet providers in these countries to avoid telecommunications equipment from Chinese company Huawei, according to a Wall Street Journal report.

 

 

Perhaps a modern form of protectionism to protect other telecommunications vendors from competition.


 
 
 
 


ajw



1442 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 136


  Reply # 2132776 23-Nov-2018 15:44
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Huawei has already shipped 10,000 5G base stations worldwide, its chairman Ken Hu announced at the Global Mobile Broadband Forum in London. Hu said 5G "demand is real" and the technology is "ready to use" but cautioned that some barriers to 5G deployment remain. 

 

At the same conference, BG Ryan Ding, head of Huawei's carrier division, said the Chinese company has signed 22 commercial contracts for 5G network equipment already. The adoption of 5G is being driven by large countries with big populations looking to take the lead in the new mobile technology and move faster than with 3G or 4G, Ding said. In addition, manufacturers are looking to develop new types of end-user devices for 5G, such as foldable phones, which should be ready in 2019. 

 

Barriers to 5G include the lack of available spectrum for operators, according to the Huawei chairman. To help speed up deployment, he recommended that governments accelerate the process of harmonizing and releasing continuous bands of large-bandwidth 5G spectrum, and at a total cost lower than 4G. Operators should already start using the C-band, while "all bands can and will eventually be used for 5G, including 2.3 GHz and 2.6 GHz", Hu said.

 

Government also need to do more work on making sites available and easing the process of building new infrastructure. This includes shared utility infrastructure, such as rooftops and light poles, to help carriers cut costs and time while also opening up new revenue streams for public utilities.


396 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 56


  Reply # 2132781 23-Nov-2018 15:50
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

wasn't the US government trying to help ZTE get back in the game? odd....


3501 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1967

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2132968 23-Nov-2018 21:19
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

I'm happy to use Huawei (or other Chinese brands of) devices on a personal level, because I simply don't care if the PLA sees my porn browsing, but if my manager ever told me we were putting in Huawei switches or servers I'd question his sanity and probably start looking for a new job. Genuinely do not think the government should permit any of the NZ Telco's to use Chinese equipment for national infrastructure, why even risk the possibility of something untoward?





Information wants to be free. The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it.


ajw



1442 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 136


  Reply # 2132972 23-Nov-2018 21:33
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

Lias:

 

I'm happy to use Huawei (or other Chinese brands of) devices on a personal level, because I simply don't care if the PLA sees my porn browsing, but if my manager ever told me we were putting in Huawei switches or servers I'd question his sanity and probably start looking for a new job. Genuinely do not think the government should permit any of the NZ Telco's to use Chinese equipment for national infrastructure, why even risk the possibility of something untoward?

 

 

(1) First I would like to see the US front up with the irrefutable evidence that Huawei and ZTE place spying software in their devices.

 

(2)  In what country are other telco manufacturers equipment made. Wouldn't surprise me if it is China.

 

(3) Is the US going to pay compensation to the mobile companies around the world who will have to pay millions more $$$ to use equipment from other vendors.

 

(4) Let the US come up with the evidence or just admit this is a blatant case of protectionism to protect US companies.

 

(5) Spark, 2 degrees, and Vodafone have been using Huawei supplied gear in their mobile and fixed line networks for years.

 

Good on Simon Moutter for making the statement either put up or shut up.

 

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=12153225

 

 

 

 





aw

ajw



1442 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 136


  Reply # 2132976 23-Nov-2018 21:49
Send private message quote this post

ajw:

 

Lias:

 

I'm happy to use Huawei (or other Chinese brands of) devices on a personal level, because I simply don't care if the PLA sees my porn browsing, but if my manager ever told me we were putting in Huawei switches or servers I'd question his sanity and probably start looking for a new job. Genuinely do not think the government should permit any of the NZ Telco's to use Chinese equipment for national infrastructure, why even risk the possibility of something untoward?

 

 

(1) First I would like to see the US front up with the irrefutable evidence that Huawei and ZTE place spying software in their devices.

 

(2)  In what country are other telco manufacturers equipment made. Wouldn't surprise me if it is China.

 

(3) Is the US going to pay compensation to the mobile companies around the world who will have to pay millions more $$$ to use equipment from other vendors.

 

(4) Let the US come up with the evidence or just admit this is a blatant case of protectionism to protect US companies.

 

(5) Spark, 2 degrees, and Vodafone have been using Huawei supplied gear in their mobile and fixed line networks for years. Also by countless other mobile and fixed line operators throughout the world.

 

Good on Simon Moutter for making the statement either put up or shut up.

 

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=12153225

 

 

 

 

 





aw

3501 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1967

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2132981 23-Nov-2018 22:11
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

ajw:

 

(1) First I would like to see the US front up with the irrefutable evidence that Huawei and ZTE place spying software in their devices.

 

(2)  In what country are other telco manufacturers equipment made. Wouldn't surprise me if it is China.

 

(3) Is the US going to pay compensation to the mobile companies around the world who will have to pay millions more $$$ to use equipment from other vendors.

 

(4) Let the US come up with the evidence or just admit this is a blatant case of protectionism to protect US companies.

 

(5) Spark, 2 degrees, and Vodafone have been using Huawei supplied gear in their mobile and fixed line networks for years.

 

Good on Simon Moutter for making the statement either put up or shut up.

 

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=12153225

 

 

1. There doesn't need to be any evidence, just the mere possibility of malfeasance is in my opinion, sufficient to require all critical/national infrastructure to be free of Huawei. The fact that Ren Zhengfei is a former PLA soldier who served 5x the minimum service required is ample reason to permanently bar them all by itself. The Chinese government and it's proxies is like an invasive weed, and I see Huawei's continued push to try and get into the critical infrastructure of western nations as proof of wrongdoing. If they had nothing to hide, they'd simply find alternative markets and stop pushing to get their equipment into our networks. Huawei is at best a pawn in the Chinese governments game that introduces possible vulnerabilities into western infrastructure , and at worst is a willing arm of the CCP and actively trying to undermine the west. Either is a no-brainer to kick them out.

 

2. Some no doubt, but Cisco for instance makes gear in many countries.

 

3. Why should they? Those vendors had a choice to purchase equipment from a more trustworthy manufacturer not associated with the Chinese government and declined. 

 

4. See #1

 

5. Yes, and the government should be forcing them to pull it all out. Again see #1

 

 





Information wants to be free. The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it.


998 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 168

UberGroup

  Reply # 2132985 23-Nov-2018 22:18
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

It would not surprise me to find out Spark are banging on about Huawei so some favourable 5g spectrum terms come there way to shut up about it. No way is anyone going to declassify the data,Someone at Spark has had the briefing and all this talk is a bit of a dick move when they know the other side can't talk about it





Most problems are the result of previous solutions...

All comment's I make are my own personal opinion and do not in any way, shape or form reflect the views of current or former employers unless specifically stated 

ajw



1442 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 136


  Reply # 2132986 23-Nov-2018 22:21
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Perhaps the US should front up and admit they are the biggest spies when it comes to the affairs of other countries.

 

Suspicion is not enough the US has to come up with the hard evidence.

 

Despite the protectionism and paranoia from the US Huawei will still be rolling out 5g networks throughout the world and will be for many years to come.

 

 


Murray River
4315 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1269

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 2132989 23-Nov-2018 22:25
Send private message quote this post

Lias:

 

1. There doesn't need to be any evidence, just the mere possibility of malfeasance is in my opinion, sufficient to require all critical/national infrastructure to be free of Huawei. The fact that Ren Zhengfei is a former PLA soldier who served 5x the minimum service required is ample reason to permanently bar them all by itself. The Chinese government and it's proxies is like an invasive weed, and I see Huawei's continued push to try and get into the critical infrastructure of western nations as proof of wrongdoing. If they had nothing to hide, they'd simply find alternative markets and stop pushing to get their equipment into our networks. Huawei is at best a pawn in the Chinese governments game that introduces possible vulnerabilities into western infrastructure , and at worst is a willing arm of the CCP and actively trying to undermine the west. Either is a no-brainer to kick them out.

 

2. Some no doubt, but Cisco for instance makes gear in many countries.

 

3. Why should they? Those vendors had a choice to purchase equipment from a more trustworthy manufacturer not associated with the Chinese government and declined. 

 

4. See #1

 

5. Yes, and the government should be forcing them to pull it all out. Again see #1

 

 

 

 

 

 

But to quote you from another thread

 

Intellectual property exists to protect the greedy. Information and ideas should always be free, and anyone who want to profit from a government granted monopoly on an idea is morally and ethically bankrupt.

 

and

 

Anyone should be free to copy it, share it, redistribute it, modify it, or use it any way they see fit so long as you are not deprived of  your physical original.

 

 

 

Which, if they are spying, is all good according to you...


998 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 168

UberGroup

  Reply # 2132991 23-Nov-2018 22:29
5 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

There's more to the concerns than just spying you know, Being able to delay/deny communications at a small or large scale is a pretty big tool to throw around even in peacetime, having control of a communications system in a hostile state for spies working on the ground can also be a pretty big deal





Most problems are the result of previous solutions...

All comment's I make are my own personal opinion and do not in any way, shape or form reflect the views of current or former employers unless specifically stated 

3501 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1967

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2132999 23-Nov-2018 22:42
Send private message quote this post

blakamin:

 

Which, if they are spying, is all good according to you...

 

 

In some ways yes, it's why I don't object to Chinese companies copying western technology, but the potential ability for them to cripple our countries critical infrastructure is far more of a concern to me than them stealing back Zespri's trade secrets...





Information wants to be free. The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it.


ajw



1442 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 136


  Reply # 2133001 23-Nov-2018 22:46
Send private message quote this post

Lias:

 

blakamin:

 

Which, if they are spying, is all good according to you...

 

 

In some ways yes, it's why I don't object to Chinese companies copying western technology, but the potential ability for them to cripple our countries critical infrastructure is far more of a concern to me than them stealing back Zespri's trade secrets...

 

 

They could have crippled it years ago when running CDMA, GSM, UMTS, LTE, and equipment used in fixed line networks.


ajw



1442 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 136


 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.