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  Reply # 2136698 29-Nov-2018 16:25
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Seeing Andrew Bowaters name makes me think, how much longer with the Pheonix sponsorship last?





Mike
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The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 


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  Reply # 2136746 29-Nov-2018 17:30
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Ha!

 

 

So GCSB is too lazy to search for the backdoors and block them I guess. Or did the US just buy up all the GCSB network specialists?

 

Any way this smacks of Ops being too lazy to actually provide descent monitoring and security for what they implement.

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 2136756 29-Nov-2018 18:01
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From Huawei:

 

The biggest potential impact will be on New Zealand consumers both in terms of technology and price due to the lack of competition. Huawei has a proven record of delivering the best technology in New Zealand at a competitive price. In March this year we achieved a then world-record of 18.23Gbps for the indoor 5G trial with Spark while our competitors were only able to achieve just over 1Gbps the same week.”

 

 

It's quite concerning that Huawei don't seem to comprehend the difference between the hundreds of MHz of mmWave spectrum used by Huawei for that test, and the much smaller block of 3.5GHz spectrum used by Nokia for their trial which delivered 1Gbps.

 

18Gbps in the real world will never realistically be achievable because carriers won't be able to acquire the amount of spectrum required to actually deliver this.

 

 


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  Reply # 2136759 29-Nov-2018 18:06
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sbiddle:

 

 

 

From Huawei:

 

The biggest potential impact will be on New Zealand consumers both in terms of technology and price due to the lack of competition. Huawei has a proven record of delivering the best technology in New Zealand at a competitive price. In March this year we achieved a then world-record of 18.23Gbps for the indoor 5G trial with Spark while our competitors were only able to achieve just over 1Gbps the same week.”

 

 

It's quite concerning that Huawei don't seem to comprehend the difference between the hundreds of MHz of mmWave spectrum used by Huawei for that test, and the much smaller block of 3.5GHz spectrum used by Nokia for their trial which delivered 1Gbps.

 

18Gbps in the real world will never realistically be achievable because carriers won't be able to acquire the amount of spectrum required to actually deliver this.

 

 

 

 

Despite his hmmm job title Andrew Bowater is a PR man and not technical. 

 

 





Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 Mac user, Windows curser, Chrome OS desired.

 

The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 


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  Reply # 2136884 29-Nov-2018 21:53
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olivernz: Ha!

So GCSB is too lazy to search for the backdoors and block them I guess. Or did the US just buy up all the GCSB network specialists?
Any way this smacks of Ops being too lazy to actually provide descent monitoring and security for what they implement.



Or maybe they have Nokia backwoods and don’t want to try hack/infiltrate the HUAWEI software code to give them the same access they already have in ‘western’ manufactured products?

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  Reply # 2136891 29-Nov-2018 22:03
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PhantomNVD:
olivernz: Ha!

So GCSB is too lazy to search for the backdoors and block them I guess. Or did the US just buy up all the GCSB network specialists?
Any way this smacks of Ops being too lazy to actually provide descent monitoring and security for what they implement.



Or maybe they have Nokia backwoods and don’t want to try hack/infiltrate the HUAWEI software code to give them the same access they already have in ‘western’ manufactured products?


Huawei carrier grade equipment has LI components built in just like Nokia and Ericsson kit does. 


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  Reply # 2137071 30-Nov-2018 10:07
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Batman:

 

I heard that (not sure if true or not) the Chinese military technology are mainly stolen from the Pentagon via hacking.

 

So the American claims are not entirely unsubstantiated.

 

Just google and there are troves of articles, I'm not making this up.

 

I don't think the Chinese will retaliate, they have bigger problems to deal with aka Donald Trump.

 

Russian tech? Same thing. Luckily their top commander did not get the Interpol Chief job or we (global citizens) will be toast.

 

 

So the Pentagon should stop using Huawei? :D


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  Reply # 2137081 30-Nov-2018 10:17
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ResponseMediaNZ:

 

PhantomNVD:
olivernz: Ha!

So GCSB is too lazy to search for the backdoors and block them I guess. Or did the US just buy up all the GCSB network specialists?
Any way this smacks of Ops being too lazy to actually provide descent monitoring and security for what they implement.



Or maybe they have Nokia backwoods and don’t want to try hack/infiltrate the HUAWEI software code to give them the same access they already have in ‘western’ manufactured products?


Huawei carrier grade equipment has LI components built in just like Nokia and Ericsson kit does. 

 

 

LI is a little different to the undocumented interception capabilties. smile


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  Reply # 2137092 30-Nov-2018 10:30
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sbiddle:

 

LI is a little different to the undocumented interception capabilties. smile

 

 

Not really... just the destination is different :)


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  Reply # 2137097 30-Nov-2018 10:34
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This news made it on to LTT's TechLinked episode yesterday. Interesting to see this news travel to the likes of Canada...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlmOYmcK3sc

 

 


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  Reply # 2137129 30-Nov-2018 11:49
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olivernz: Ha!

So GCSB is too lazy to search for the backdoors and block them I guess.



No, as I noted above, the UK has a dedicated unit looking at this gear which we get the results of via ‘five eyes’. However they have yet to find anything so UK telcos are happy to use the gear.

As others have commented, 95% political.

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  Reply # 2137143 30-Nov-2018 12:24
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Scotdownunder:
olivernz: Ha!

So GCSB is too lazy to search for the backdoors and block them I guess.



No, as I noted above, the UK has a dedicated unit looking at this gear which we get the results of via ‘five eyes’. However they have yet to find anything so UK telcos are happy to use the gear.

As others have commented, 95% political.


I would make the suggestion (I think I did in an earlier post) that one does not need to build features into the equipment to allow people to get access, so it is unlikely that anyone would do so. I think that would be rather amateur.

To put it another way, if vendor x makes and sells a product, they would not need to put in any measures to allow people to access the product in an unintended manner. In that regard they can claim they are not doing anything nefarious and meet all of the regulations - however, there is nothing to stop organisation y from doing these activities instead. This is not to suggest that organisation y would do this either - but from a security point of view, one needs to ask the question in order to assess the risk.

In terms of people in the UK looking at the product, I would suggest that this is a common practice for telecomunications as part of the compliance and certification process. In terms of the statement ‘The UK has a dedicated unit’ - this is an awfully generic statement. Is the unit part of an organisation or part of the government - are they doing compilance testing or are they doing something else.

To me, its like one of those adverts on TV where they have someone dresses in a white coat and say things like ‘experts agree that buying our product is a good thing’.




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  Reply # 2137221 30-Nov-2018 13:19
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TwoSeven:

In terms of people in the UK looking at the product, I would suggest that this is a common practice for telecomunications as part of the compliance and certification process. In terms of the statement ‘The UK has a dedicated unit’ - this is an awfully generic statement. Is the unit part of an organisation or part of the government - are they doing compilance testing or are they doing something else.

To me, its like one of those adverts on TV where they have someone dresses in a white coat and say things like ‘experts agree that buying our product is a good thing’.

 

 

 

The UK testing is very real and it is not common practice for a government to have such a deep oversight of the code. The evaluation unit reports to the UK government on Huawei's performance.

 

You can read their latest oversight report at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/727415/20180717_HCSEC_Oversight_Board_Report_2018_-_FINAL.pdf ' target='_blank'> https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/727415/20180717_HCSEC_Oversight_Board_Report_2018_-_FINAL.pdf


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  Reply # 2140339 6-Dec-2018 08:58
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So new twist (Link courtesy of Peter L of Peter Reader fame who posted it to the ISIG mailing list this morning)

 

The UK has now blocked Huawei from being part of the 5g core, and even further is now removing any Huawei equipment from the 3/4g core network too.

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/amp/technology-46453425

 

 

 

 





Information wants to be free. The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it.




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  Reply # 2140358 6-Dec-2018 09:14
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If there's one thing we know is that supply chain can be compromised. At the end of the day, good luck getting any equipment not "Made in China", regardless of manufacturer.





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