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  Reply # 925241 1-Nov-2013 00:46
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NonprayingMantis:
FelixW:
NonprayingMantis:
1080p: Mention the fact that you wish to upgrade your plan and if you're forced to pay in order to do so you will switch to another provider.

Watch your problems disappear.

In which case he will still have to pay to break his contract.


If you sign a contract, you should live with the terms.


surely you should be able to change plan and extend contract if you are moving to something more expensive 


Why? More expensive does not necessarily mean more profitable.


It literally does. 10% of $100 is $10 and 10% of $200 is $20. Last time I checked $20 > $10.

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  Reply # 925253 1-Nov-2013 02:14
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1080p:

It literally does. 10% of $100 is $10 and 10% of $200 is $20. Last time I checked $20 > $10.


Think of it as a business point of view, the plans still have margins, it could actually be lower margin compared to the other plan. Companies gotta pay staff, bandwidth, routing, peering, fibre, electricity and Chorus to give you this internet so nothing is free. ISP's calculate a margin on each plan based off the amount of data it provides, the real cost of providing it and what impact it has on their network offering it. If the customer signed up to a plan with a higher margin and wants to change to a plan with a lower margin whilst they're in contract the ISP is losing out on this.

If you sign a contract understand the terms and stick to them instead of trying to complain your way out of something you agreed on.




 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 925254 1-Nov-2013 03:18
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michaelmurfy:

Think of it as a business point of view, the plans still have margins, it could actually be lower margin compared to the other plan. Companies gotta pay staff, bandwidth, routing, peering, fibre, electricity and Chorus to give you this internet so nothing is free. ISP's calculate a margin on each plan based off the amount of data it provides, the real cost of providing it and what impact it has on their network offering it. If the customer signed up to a plan with a higher margin and wants to change to a plan with a lower margin whilst they're in contract the ISP is losing out on this.

If you sign a contract understand the terms and stick to them instead of trying to complain your way out of something you agreed on.


Or, just move to telecom when you can as they allow switching plans within a contract (they even let me move to a slightly cheaper plan without penalty!!!). 

ps, I seriously doubt cheaper plans have higher margins. 


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  Reply # 925288 1-Nov-2013 07:39
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1080p:
NonprayingMantis:
FelixW:
NonprayingMantis:
1080p: Mention the fact that you wish to upgrade your plan and if you're forced to pay in order to do so you will switch to another provider.

Watch your problems disappear.

In which case he will still have to pay to break his contract.


If you sign a contract, you should live with the terms.


surely you should be able to change plan and extend contract if you are moving to something more expensive 


Why? More expensive does not necessarily mean more profitable.


It literally does. 10% of $100 is $10 and 10% of $200 is $20. Last time I checked $20 > $10.


It might do, or it might not.

Margins are not the same across all plans. Different plans incur different costs. It's possible that a more expensive plan is less profitable than a cheaper one because it includes some elements that cost a lot more.



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  Reply # 931666 12-Nov-2013 18:25
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so after trying to change plan afew times over the last few months with no luck we randomly got a txt from vodafone today saying we might be better suited to another plan since we going over our data and paying extra for calls. rang the sales number back and we swapped onto a plan thats costing $1 less a month for more than twice the mobile data, free minutes(didnt have free minutes on old plan) plus unlimited txt.
There was no mention of having to pay to break contract or anything like that, just a new contract for 12months(there was 6 left on existing one).

Is very annoying that i tryed to change plan for months but got told i will have to pay to break contract, then out of the blue they txt asking if i want to change plans. was almost about break contract to move somewhere else.

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  Reply # 931695 12-Nov-2013 19:48
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(This is why you don't sign 2 year contracts! Because better plans will come along and you'll be screwed)

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  Reply # 931729 12-Nov-2013 21:24
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Lets reverse it. If you feel it's OK to change your contract with absolutely no consequences, how would you feel if Vodafone suddenly decided to change the price they charge you?

I bet you'd argue till your black and blue that you've agreed to a set price for X months and that's what you should be paying.




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