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Topic # 150203 15-Jul-2014 08:52
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I've been looking at moving over to Vodafone TV with a naked UFB plan, planning to use my own router.

Can anyone from VF confirm whether there are any 'data tracking' implications of not using VF hardware?


Aside from acting as an IGMP proxy with IGMP snooping enabled, is there anything else 'special' that the VF hardware does?


Also, could someone elaborate / confirm what separation there is in terms of internet vs tv traffic?

I'm assuming they are delivered over the same piece of fibre with some sort of QoS applied?


I'd be really keen to find out as much technical detail as possible :)

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  Reply # 1089042 15-Jul-2014 09:00
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You can use your own router and TV traffic / internet traffic are delivered separate,

Few threads already about this on Geekzone

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  Reply # 1089083 15-Jul-2014 09:38
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Also, could someone elaborate / confirm what separation there is in terms of internet vs tv traffic?

I'm assuming they are delivered over the same piece of fibre with some sort of QoS applied?



It's very simple - it's delivered as multicast.



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  Reply # 1089084 15-Jul-2014 09:38
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If your TV breaks though, you will need to put the supplied router back in place.




Check out my LPFM Radio Station at www.thecheese.co.nz cool




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  Reply # 1089090 15-Jul-2014 09:44
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I fully understand that if I use my own hardware there is no support etc...

Aside from 'enabling multicast', is there anything else at all that the VF supplied router is actually doing?

Is there any QoS tagging applied by the VF router?

How exactly is the TV and internet traffic separated?

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  Reply # 1089100 15-Jul-2014 09:55
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chrispchikin:How exactly is the TV and internet traffic separated?


Magic but Steve has already pointed out above

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  Reply # 1089106 15-Jul-2014 10:00
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chrispchikin:

How exactly is the TV and internet traffic separated?


Multicast.

If you don't understand how that works your best bet is to Google it.





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  Reply # 1089118 15-Jul-2014 10:08
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I know what multicast is, how it works and how to configure it in an enterprise environment.

Multicast does not provide any separation of IP traffic, it simply saves upstream bandwidth by sending a single stream to a distribution point to be forwarded to 'members' requesting the stream as apposed to sending multiple unicast streams to clients.

Is there anyone who can explain how the traffic is separated?

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  Reply # 1089125 15-Jul-2014 10:15
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chrispchikin: I know what multicast is, how it works and how to configure it in an enterprise environment.

Multicast does not provide any separation of IP traffic, it simply saves upstream bandwidth by sending a single stream to a distribution point to be forwarded to 'members' requesting the stream as apposed to sending multiple unicast streams to clients.

Is there anyone who can explain how the traffic is separated?

Let's say there is downstream, upstream and TV traffic. 100/50/72.
I couldn't say in much more detail.




 


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  Reply # 1089131 15-Jul-2014 10:21
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chrispchikin:
Is there anyone who can explain how the traffic is separated?


From memory is uses a PCP of 4.

To answer your question you'd be best to read the entire multicast document on the CFH or Chorus websites which explains exactly how multicast works over UFB.






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  Reply # 1089137 15-Jul-2014 10:30
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Awesome, that's exactly what I was looking for!

For anyone else who wants to known, the relevant doc is here:

http://www.crownfibre.govt.nz/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Chorus-UFB-Services-Agreement-Service-Description-for-Multicast-Service.pdf

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Chorus

  Reply # 1089461 15-Jul-2014 18:53
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One comment to add, although you'll probably figure it out from our service description that you have found, is I would recommend ensuring your router treats IGMP as a higher class of service and marks it as .1p=4 (or 5 if you end up on a right performing plan)

Purely to prevent IGMP traffic being impacted by other best effort traffic in your router. IGMP from the end user is managed magically once it hits the ONT.

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  Reply # 1089485 15-Jul-2014 19:37
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TimA:
chrispchikin: I know what multicast is, how it works and how to configure it in an enterprise environment.

Multicast does not provide any separation of IP traffic, it simply saves upstream bandwidth by sending a single stream to a distribution point to be forwarded to 'members' requesting the stream as apposed to sending multiple unicast streams to clients.

Is there anyone who can explain how the traffic is separated?

Let's say there is downstream, upstream and TV traffic. 100/50/72.
I couldn't say in much more detail.


What about VF's 200Mbps plans? 200/50/72?



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  Reply # 1089490 15-Jul-2014 19:41
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jjnz1:
TimA:
chrispchikin: I know what multicast is, how it works and how to configure it in an enterprise environment.

Multicast does not provide any separation of IP traffic, it simply saves upstream bandwidth by sending a single stream to a distribution point to be forwarded to 'members' requesting the stream as apposed to sending multiple unicast streams to clients.

Is there anyone who can explain how the traffic is separated?

Let's say there is downstream, upstream and TV traffic. 100/50/72.
I couldn't say in much more detail.


What about VF's 200Mbps plans? 200/50/72?




Yup, and 30/10/72




 


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  Reply # 1089499 15-Jul-2014 19:46
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I'm holding out for 500/250/72 !

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Chorus

  Reply # 1089506 15-Jul-2014 19:56
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Don't focus on the '72' too much. Chorus ensures you get the right number of channels depending on the number of STBs you have purchased. VF and Chorus work together to ensure handover and backhaul bandwidth is enough to pass all the channels needed at the required bitrates for the entire multicast domain.

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