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  # 1354249 29-Jul-2015 11:15
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people kinda have to have some onus on themselves to understand what they are using and how it works. There is tonnes of info out there on how this stuff works and its limitations etc.



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  # 1354299 29-Jul-2015 11:51
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Jase2985: people kinda have to have some onus on themselves to understand what they are using and how it works. There is tonnes of info out there on how this stuff works and its limitations etc.


True enough and this applies to everything that people fork out their hard-earned cash on! However, there are a large number of "non-tech" people out there who are basically using WiFi for their internet all the time. They use mobile phones for internet more and more and have a mobile data plan for when they can't use WiFi at home etc. Their smart TV has WiFi and even the nav systems on their cars have WiFi. Such people aren't all that interested in wired cable systems for their internet. When you travel, all the motels etc provide you with a WiFi connection. Heaps of people are now moving to getting unlimited data for video streaming and they expect that their WiFi connections will be good enough to get HD pictures!

So although all these people should jump onto internet and research whether it's really worthwhile to get 200Mbps download speeds when they upgrade to unlimited data plans for streaming video, I think there are many who won't (OK then they shouldn't complain later about slow WiFi speeds). But all I have been saying is that, because there are thousands and thousands of us who live in a "WiFi" world, it wouldn't hurt the ISPs to include some explanatory WiFi data with their new high speed data plans instead of expecting people to come onto forums like this to get advice from high-tech techs such as yourselves!

Regards
Fred



 
 
 
 


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  # 1354318 29-Jul-2015 12:20
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frednz:
Jase2985: what wifi card is in your computer?


Intel Centrino Wireless-N 2230


Take a look in the modem settings under Wireless, Radio. Make sure 802.11n is enabled, maybe try it on 5GHz instead of 2.4GHz (distance will be less, but less likely to be noise from other devices that might be clogging up 2.4GHz near you).

Edit - looks like there might be an option to turn off 802.11g under Wireless, Advanced. This could help force it on to 802.11n for testing purposes. Play with some settings and see how it goes. :)



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  # 1354517 29-Jul-2015 15:41
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VodafoneDylan:
frednz:
Jase2985: what wifi card is in your computer?


Intel Centrino Wireless-N 2230


Take a look in the modem settings under Wireless, Radio. Make sure 802.11n is enabled, maybe try it on 5GHz instead of 2.4GHz (distance will be less, but less likely to be noise from other devices that might be clogging up 2.4GHz near you).

Edit - looks like there might be an option to turn off 802.11g under Wireless, Advanced. This could help force it on to 802.11n for testing purposes. Play with some settings and see how it goes. :)


Thanks for your advice. I have checked the modem settings and 802.11 n-mode is set to "auto" for both 2.4G and 5G. I don't have an option to turn off 802.11g under Wireless, Advanced.

When WiFi is selected, my mobile phone selects 5.0GHz but my laptop when on WiFi selects 2.4GHz.

I have just done a speed test and it gave speeds of 35.4Mbps download and 2.1Mbps upload on the 50Mbps unlimited plan. This is when the laptop is 12 metres away from the modem and it doesn't have any problems displaying HD video except when the network is sometimes congested after 8pm.

Regards
Fred


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  # 1354703 29-Jul-2015 17:41
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and your signal stregnth is? and your connection speed is?

mdf

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  # 1354819 29-Jul-2015 19:42
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If you haven't already, you should read @sbiddle's excellent blog post on the subject.

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  # 1355099 30-Jul-2015 10:02
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frednz:
Jase2985: people kinda have to have some onus on themselves to understand what they are using and how it works. There is tonnes of info out there on how this stuff works and its limitations etc.



I recently saw a YouTube clip of a guy who had mapped out the wifi signal strength in his living room, using a Raspberry Pi, and various other items. He showed that a typical room has a "mesh" of nodes and antinodes of signal strength. Because of the frequencies being used, you can change your received signal strength significantly by moving your receiver just 2 to 3cm left, right, forward, back, up or down.

If you habitually have your device in exactly the same place, and have inexplicable signal-strength issues, try moving it just an inch in one direction.

Shadbolt

 
 
 
 


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  # 1355110 30-Jul-2015 10:25
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Shadbolt:
frednz:
Jase2985: people kinda have to have some onus on themselves to understand what they are using and how it works. There is tonnes of info out there on how this stuff works and its limitations etc.



I recently saw a YouTube clip of a guy who had mapped out the wifi signal strength in his living room, using a Raspberry Pi, and various other items. He showed that a typical room has a "mesh" of nodes and antinodes of signal strength. Because of the frequencies being used, you can change your received signal strength significantly by moving your receiver just 2 to 3cm left, right, forward, back, up or down.

If you habitually have your device in exactly the same place, and have inexplicable signal-strength issues, try moving it just an inch in one direction.

Shadbolt


I don't doubt it, but it does sound just a little like you're trolling and want to drive people nuts by moving their modem up, down, left, right, forward or back by an inch and test with each configuration. Along the same lines I hear that the amount of organic material in a room can affect wifi performance. This can be mitigated somewhat by pressing your tongue to the left of your mouth while using a laptop, unless you have extensive fillings or are left handed, in which case to the right. ;)


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  # 1355117 30-Jul-2015 10:32
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VodafoneDylan:
Shadbolt:
frednz:
Jase2985: people kinda have to have some onus on themselves to understand what they are using and how it works. There is tonnes of info out there on how this stuff works and its limitations etc.



I recently saw a YouTube clip of a guy who had mapped out the wifi signal strength in his living room, using a Raspberry Pi, and various other items. He showed that a typical room has a "mesh" of nodes and antinodes of signal strength. Because of the frequencies being used, you can change your received signal strength significantly by moving your receiver just 2 to 3cm left, right, forward, back, up or down.

If you habitually have your device in exactly the same place, and have inexplicable signal-strength issues, try moving it just an inch in one direction.

Shadbolt


I don't doubt it, but it does sound just a little like you're trolling and want to drive people nuts by moving their modem up, down, left, right, forward or back by an inch and test with each configuration. Along the same lines I hear that the amount of organic material in a room can affect wifi performance. This can be mitigated somewhat by pressing your tongue to the left of your mouth while using a laptop, unless you have extensive fillings or are left handed, in which case to the right. ;)



It's to the right, don't you know anything??  :-)  

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  # 1355124 30-Jul-2015 10:43
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Sorry to disappoint, Dylan, but I've been an RF Communications engineer for 35 years. The coloured 3D map that the engineer produced was very detailed. Anyone who understands about constructive/destructive nodes in transmission systems will know what I'm talking about.

It's not a troll - it really is as it sounds. Signal strength at Wifi frequencies, in a room, can vary considerably, at distances based on the wavelength that is being used. With wifi, it's under 5cm between the peaks.

Shadders

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  # 1355128 30-Jul-2015 10:46
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Shadbolt:
frednz:
Jase2985: people kinda have to have some onus on themselves to understand what they are using and how it works. There is tonnes of info out there on how this stuff works and its limitations etc.



I recently saw a YouTube clip of a guy who had mapped out the wifi signal strength in his living room, using a Raspberry Pi, and various other items. He showed that a typical room has a "mesh" of nodes and antinodes of signal strength. Because of the frequencies being used, you can change your received signal strength significantly by moving your receiver just 2 to 3cm left, right, forward, back, up or down.

If you habitually have your device in exactly the same place, and have inexplicable signal-strength issues, try moving it just an inch in one direction.

Shadbolt


If a nearby neighbours wifi is in range, will that neighbour starting a download or streaming affect the users wifi? Given that there is more neighbour data whizzing around the users airwaves causing more collisions?

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Ultimate Geek

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  # 1355129 30-Jul-2015 10:48
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Shadbolt: Sorry to disappoint, Dylan, but I've been an RF Communications engineer for 35 years. The coloured 3D map that the engineer produced was very detailed. Anyone who understands about constructive/destructive nodes in transmission systems will know what I'm talking about.

It's not a troll - it really is as it sounds. Signal strength at Wifi frequencies, in a room, can vary considerably, at distances based on the wavelength that is being used. With wifi, it's under 5cm between the peaks.

Shadders


Cool. Do you have a link to the video? Would be interested to see it.

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Master Geek


  # 1355135 30-Jul-2015 10:50
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VodafoneDylan:

Cool. Do you have a link to the video? Would be interested to see it.


I'm trying to find it now.... :-)

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Master Geek


  # 1355151 30-Jul-2015 11:07
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Here it is - I mis-remembered the Raspberry Pi bit, but the rest is as I described:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqqEYz38ens


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  # 1355181 30-Jul-2015 11:49
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tdgeek: If a nearby neighbours wifi is in range, will that neighbour starting a download or streaming affect the users wifi? Given that there is more neighbour data whizzing around the users airwaves causing more collisions?


Yes that's about the only time another network will bother you. That is why just choosing the channel with the fewest other APs on it in a network scan isn't actually that useful as it doesn't show if they are in use or what side the bonded channel is on for 40mhz devices on ch 6.





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