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  # 1355182 30-Jul-2015 11:50
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Shadbolt: Here it is - I mis-remembered the Raspberry Pi bit, but the rest is as I described:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqqEYz38ens



Wow. That's really quite something. Thanks!

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  # 1355187 30-Jul-2015 11:55
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Welcome.

Lucky I could prove my point, or else y'all would still think I'm a troll. ;-)

Shadders

 
 
 
 


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  # 1355191 30-Jul-2015 11:59
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Although moving it a little to fix it really only happens if both ends only have a single antenna. 2x2 and 3x3 confirm shouldn't have the problem.




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  # 1355409 30-Jul-2015 16:47
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Shadbolt: Here it is - I mis-remembered the Raspberry Pi bit, but the rest is as I described:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqqEYz38ens



That really was an interesting watch indeed. 




#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.




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  # 1355538 30-Jul-2015 20:50
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ZollyMonsta: Wifi was created for convenience, not speed.


True, but does Vodafone warn customers about this?

When you look at the Vodafone site, there is considerable emphasis on marketing broadband speed. For example, the words “Fast”, “Faster” and “Fastest” are used. There is also reference to upgrading your speed, for example, from Ultra Fast 30 to Ultra Fast 100/20 or 200/20.

Under the heading “Important things to know and Vodafone Offer Summary”, it says this about broadband speed: “Your broadband speed will vary depending on a number of factors including NZ and overseas networks, your modem and computer technology including wifi capability, internal home wiring, other environmental factors, and how many other people are using it at the time. Uploads and downloads count towards your monthly allowance.”

However, I think that Vodafone should say something like “the quoted maximum broadband speed can seldom be achieved by using wifi and that wired broadband connections are strongly recommended.”

I think that the words “wifi capability” used by Vodafone don’t warn consumers that "wifi was created for convenience, not speed" and that actual wifi speeds are often considerably less than those achieved with wired connections. Of course, there is a "Consumer Guarantees Act” which is designed to protect consumers who feel they have not been told the full story!

Regards
Fred

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  # 1355545 30-Jul-2015 21:01
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frednz:
ZollyMonsta: Wifi was created for convenience, not speed.


True, but does Vodafone warn customers about this?


its not vodafones job, they provide an internet service, in this case over cable. they don't provide a wifi service. they give you a device with wifi because its a nicety. 
you are just being picky, and in reality its a non issue for 99.5% of people.





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  # 1355552 30-Jul-2015 21:17
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Jase2985:
frednz:
ZollyMonsta: Wifi was created for convenience, not speed.


True, but does Vodafone warn customers about this?


its not vodafones job, they provide an internet service, in this case over cable. they don't provide a wifi service. they give you a device with wifi because its a nicety. 
you are just being picky, and in reality its a non issue for 99.5% of people.




I disagree that it's a "non issue for 99.5% of people". I would say that a fairly large percentage of internet users now rely mainly on wifi for their internet needs and this is borne out by the increasing numbers of people who use mobile phones and tablets etc for their internet.

For example, Google is now advising website developers to upgrade their sites so that they are "mobile friendly" or their sites will be "de-ranked" for mobile users.

I think there are many mobile phone / tablet users etc who no longer use wired internet connections and who would not be aware of all the issues dealt with in this thread! So, because Vodafone has a section in its web site that deals with "important things to know" about broadband speed etc, I think this section should be made clearer about the use of wifi and its speed limitations.

Regards
Fred

 
 
 
 


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  # 1355653 31-Jul-2015 07:38
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Ignorance is something I discussed quite extensively in my blog post about WiFi from a few months ago that's now had something like 80,000 views. There isn't a solution to the WiFi problem - it's really up to the end user to educate themselves.

The reality is your ISP has absolutely no control at all over your WiFi, and can't have any. WiFi coverage and performance will depend on variables that exist solely on your environment, and will be affected by decisions you make around placement of your hardware, and external influences such as the use of 2.4GHz cordless phones, Bluetooth devices, and microwave ovens.  The simple reality is that in some urban environments the 2.4GHz band is basically completely useless.

Many people don't want to understand how their technology works, they just expect it to work. In the world we're in now this quite simply isn't how things work. People who live in ignorance are the ones who don't want to listen to advice and keep changing ISPs because they believe they're receiving a substandard service, and meanwhile will encounter the exact same problems with their next provider because they're not willing to address WiFi or internal cabling related issues. An ISP telling an end user the problem is there own making and that WiFi is outside their control goes down like a lead brick with the average customer - hence it being a very difficult area for an ISP to offer advice on, despite it now being a massive area of complaints.

WiFi is, and always will be a best effort service that is a convenient complementary offering to Ethernet. It is not, and will never* be a replacement for Ethernet with any current 802.11 standard.

(* = until we see 60GHz standards that offer full duplex connectivity. The move to 60GHz will see wireless coverage limited solely to the room in which an AP exists).




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  # 1355718 31-Jul-2015 09:35
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Fred, I can't believe this thread is still going, it ended after the first couple of replies. The thread was about a wifi problem, and you have been advised that its not actually a problem that wifi decreases in speed and signal with distance. Its normal. Ive not many any non IT literate people who have a problem with that, this is just one of many things in life that are limited.

You need to have a correct expectation and not see this as a problem, as it isn't. it is standard wireless behaviour. If you read Steve's blog, you will find out why, and see ways to help maximise what you have.

If you feel this is an issue for 99.5% of people you are way off he mark. Unless you expect a massive range for wifi, which is not and has never been the case. This is why people suggest in a large home, two level home, to cable access points together.  



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  # 1356500 1-Aug-2015 10:04
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frednz:
ZollyMonsta: Wifi was created for convenience, not speed.


True, but does Vodafone warn customers about this?

When you look at the Vodafone site, there is considerable emphasis on marketing broadband speed. For example, the words “Fast”, “Faster” and “Fastest” are used. There is also reference to upgrading your speed, for example, from Ultra Fast 30 to Ultra Fast 100/20 or 200/20.

Under the heading “Important things to know and Vodafone Offer Summary”, it says this about broadband speed: “Your broadband speed will vary depending on a number of factors including NZ and overseas networks, your modem and computer technology including wifi capability, internal home wiring, other environmental factors, and how many other people are using it at the time. Uploads and downloads count towards your monthly allowance.”

However, I think that Vodafone should say something like “the quoted maximum broadband speed can seldom be achieved by using wifi and that wired broadband connections are strongly recommended.”

I think that the words “wifi capability” used by Vodafone don’t warn consumers that "wifi was created for convenience, not speed" and that actual wifi speeds are often considerably less than those achieved with wired connections. Of course, there is a "Consumer Guarantees Act” which is designed to protect consumers who feel they have not been told the full story!

Regards
Fred


I have just come across a Vodafone booklet called "Ultra Fast Broadband: Your guide to staying connected to the world". With regard to broadband speed, it says in this booklet that:

"Please note: your broadband speed will vary depending on things like how far you are from our equipment and how many other people are using it at the time. So the speed of your plan is the maximum possible speed, not a guaranteed speed." 

So, even though these facts may be very obvious to all but the "ignorant" it is to Vodafone's credit that they have chosen to include this "speed limitation clause" in their brochure. Perhaps this is an example of how our consumer laws, such as the Consumer Guarantees Act, are working in the best interests of all consumers, and in particular, those who are not technically minded.

Thanks again to all those who politely gave their views on this interesting topic.

Regards
Fred

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  # 1356505 1-Aug-2015 10:45
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Lots of good information above. The tip about using an app to monitor your WiFi and select a better channel (or technology) is appropriate.

I was in Sydney last week and here is how WiFi was in my hotel room. The max speed was around 200 Kbps - no joke. 



On the other hand the 5GHz band was empty. Obviously just moving channels within 2.4GHz wouldn't do anything but moving bands would give better results. This also means all your devices need to support 5GHz, the AP needs to be in a central point, high, without obstructions, etc, etc...

As per other people's comments about the ISP providing notice... It's no different really than expecting a power company to tell consumers that a front loading dryer will give better results than drying clothes outside - that's because everyone has a very specific case and results will vary based on the brand of this mythical dryer, if it's sunny or raining outside, etc. Results will always vary wildly between solutions.

I understand people have mobile devices that can't use ethernet but most of these devices have very low WiFi specs anyway, except for newer devices on the higher end of the price pyramid.

By default, for best results around the house, go wired.




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  # 1356991 2-Aug-2015 09:52

Another way of describing Wifi is to compare it with electricity. The power company supplies my house with an electricity connection that can supply up to 63Amps at 240Volts. But it would end very badly if I tried to draw 63Amps out of a normal power socket. (which is rated to 10Amps)

If I want to be able to draw 63A from a power socket. It is up to me to pay for an electrician to install a socket with a high enough current rating and a bigger cable between it and the switchboard. There is no way that the power company would ever pay for any upgrades to the internal wiring in my house.





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