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  Reply # 1638083 21-Sep-2016 10:12
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Anything down to a t2.nano should be capable of many megabits, it's TCP latency or routing that will slow it down. My t2.micro instance can generate 50MB/sec internally within AWS to another instance. I just had a play with FTP and got 15Mbps (2MBps) up to that t2.micro instance over a Vodafone corporate fiber connection. If I tested from a computer in the USA I would expect it would go a fair bit faster.

 

Vodafone routing is often  non-optimal. That's part of the reason I moved to Snap/2degrees.





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  Reply # 1638163 21-Sep-2016 12:09
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timmmay:

 

Anything down to a t2.nano should be capable of many megabits

 

 

Yes, my numbers were in *bytes/s

 

I typically see about the same speed as you say, around 1-2MBytes/s from us-west-1 to NZ (Vodafone Cable), and typically double that from us-west-1 to elsewhere in US (non amazon).

 

I also have an instance running in Sydney (ap-southeast-2) at the moment, about the same throughput to NZ (Vodafone Cable), but to the non-amazon machine I tested from in the states it's not so hot (300-400KBytes/s).

 

 

 

 





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