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  Reply # 139952 23-Jun-2008 15:01
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This was Karori

Cyril

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  Reply # 139976 23-Jun-2008 17:00
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cyril7: Hi Peter, while I am happy with your recommendation on WRT, which I have flashed on to routers before, I dont believe that this is totally the issue here as I have seen various basic routers just like the 614 that pete has work on the ARP flooded TCL network albeit with eventaul difficulties due to the excessive ARP overhead.

In this situation a freshly booted and correctly configured router simply does not pass traffic, this I belive is someother issue seperate to the ARP levels that typically upset small/basic routers, even then these routers will work with no issues for a period before being overwhelmed by ARP traffic, this one cannot even get a peep other than DNS service, which it seems to do easily without trouble.

Cyril


Just to add my two cents worth. I used to run a Dlink 802.11b wireless router andit worked sort of okay. I then upgraded to a Belkin 802.11a/b/g router I had purchased in the US and began to have random lockups etc. I attributed these to a router problem and contacted Belkin NZ. While they were not exactly willing to help, they did honour the warranty and sent me a new router. But on testing the one I sent back they found no problems (well they are in Auckland so did not have a TCL network to test it on) and the new one didn't perform much better. They were not willing to replace it again so I had to live with it.

I then replaced the Belkin with a Dlink DI784 802.11a/b/g router and that performed okay for about a year when I started to get random lockups requiring either a router power reset or modem reset. I got TCL to replace the modem which seemed to help but the micro outages kept on occurring. I also tried the process of changing all my internal IP addresses away from 192.168.1.x to avoid comflict with other devices on the TCL network.

Finally Pete offered to lend me a flashed Linksys WRT54GL. Since installing that I have had very few if any micro outages and the entire Internet experience is much better than before. So I have purchased one (as Pete says - they are relatively cheap and there is free shipping)

So while the problem might not be confined to entirely the ARP flood on the network, the fact that a different (the fourth in my experience) has finally solved the problem, makes me a happy camper!

Of course I do applaud and encourage TCL's efforts to fix the problem so we are not required to purchase a certain brand of router to obtain a good Internet experience.

Larry




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  Reply # 139981 23-Jun-2008 17:09
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Hi Larry, I have seen the effect of ARP flooging on various routers, but this is something quite different, it simply will not pass any traffic other than DNS. Normally with ARP flooding there are sparodic periods of usefull operation albeit at limited throughput, this simply does not go from boot onward.

I think this is some issue either with the particular DOCSIS modem that pete has, or a configuation issue with the CMTS and his IP/DOCSIS MAC but not totally an issue related directly to his router.

Cheers
Cyril

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  Reply # 140014 23-Jun-2008 19:25
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cyril7: Hi Larry, I have seen the effect of ARP flooging on various routers, but this is something quite different, it simply will not pass any traffic other than DNS. Normally with ARP flooding there are sparodic periods of usefull operation albeit at limited throughput, this simply does not go from boot onward.

I think this is some issue either with the particular DOCSIS modem that pete has, or a configuation issue with the CMTS and his IP/DOCSIS MAC but not totally an issue related directly to his router.


One thing I have had which is semi but not totally related as to machines going off the air, TCL have a every 12 hours (might be less, I forget as it wasn't me having the problem... in fact it may be 6?) ICMP Ping from the default router back to your IP, if it doesn't respond then you are dropped off the internet, this wouldn't affect you if you were home, but an ex-colleague of mine had this issue where is home web server would disappear off the internet randomly during the day.  He finally after months (10 all up from memory) found out that his cheapie PIX was filtering all ICMP messages, and TCL did a ping from the default route so if they never got a response and your end never created any traffic during that period you would get dropped off the internet.

Again the offer stands, worth a crack (especially if it's only Karori) having a go with a DD-WRT loaded router, it seems that the DD-WRT guys are looking at loading DD-WRT on the NetGear WGR614 so perhaps there might be a way with that router.... But it may brick your router if you don't do it properly.... Still recommend a WRT54GL ;).





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  Reply # 141276 29-Jun-2008 17:54
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Having decided to go for Telstra broadband and a wireless router, the messages on this forum (and I read most of them at the start) seemed clear - get a Linksys WRT5GL from Ascent and the rest is a breeze. I should say I had no interest in "flashing" anything with third party software - if the commercial product doesn't work it should not be sold in my view. All I want is a simple (!?) home wireless connection for one pc and a couple of laptops.

Telstra installed the broadband, on time, and a neat job. Brilliant!

Ascent then delivered the router in an instant. End of breeze.

Many wasted hours later, I have nothing to show for the experience. The included Linksys CD is a dud - it hangs at stage 7 demanding a password (nothing works, including the alleged default password "admin"). Tried it on two computers - twice on each - same result.

I should then have thrown the CD out. Unfortunately I did not.

Doing a manual install, with JonC's helplist from his 13 October 2006 post, I got to a (brief) moment where the router worked on a wired connection (Telstra/ router/ pc). Not thinking, I then tried the CD to configure the wireless. That sank everything, including the settings which had previously made the router work. Re-setting everything got the Modem/ pc going again... then attempting a second install even JohnC's instructions didn't work second time around.

Along the way I have tackled firewall permissions, Microsoft XP instructions (even tried their "how to install a router" guideline which at least could be understood), and re-read all the forum material here.

Yes, I expect the hardware can be made to work, by someone with more knowledge than mine. Yet I have used computers for 21 years now, and until now have always won out in the end.

I don't believe the CD is any use.

And the router easy? a breeze?

This is not a request for assistance. It is simply a report on the reality of this equipment and its use. This is 2008 and I cannot believe that one has to be a computer expert to set up a home wireless router self-marketed by Linksys as "easy start, easy security, easy everyday".

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  Reply # 141292 29-Jun-2008 18:39
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mandarin: Having decided to go for Telstra broadband and a wireless router, the messages on this forum (and I read most of them at the start) seemed clear - get a Linksys WRT5GL from Ascent and the rest is a breeze. I should say I had no interest in "flashing" anything with third party software - if the commercial product doesn't work it should not be sold in my view. All I want is a simple (!?) home wireless connection for one pc and a couple of laptops.

Telstra installed the broadband, on time, and a neat job. Brilliant!

Ascent then delivered the router in an instant. End of breeze.

Many wasted hours later, I have nothing to show for the experience. The included Linksys CD is a dud - it hangs at stage 7 demanding a password (nothing works, including the alleged default password "admin"). Tried it on two computers - twice on each - same result.

I should then have thrown the CD out. Unfortunately I did not.

Doing a manual install, with JonC's helplist from his 13 October 2006 post, I got to a (brief) moment where the router worked on a wired connection (Telstra/ router/ pc). Not thinking, I then tried the CD to configure the wireless. That sank everything, including the settings which had previously made the router work. Re-setting everything got the Modem/ pc going again... then attempting a second install even JohnC's instructions didn't work second time around.

Along the way I have tackled firewall permissions, Microsoft XP instructions (even tried their "how to install a router" guideline which at least could be understood), and re-read all the forum material here.

Yes, I expect the hardware can be made to work, by someone with more knowledge than mine. Yet I have used computers for 21 years now, and until now have always won out in the end.

I don't believe the CD is any use.

And the router easy? a breeze?

This is not a request for assistance. It is simply a report on the reality of this equipment and its use. This is 2008 and I cannot believe that one has to be a computer expert to set up a home wireless router self-marketed by Linksys as "easy start, easy security, easy everyday".


Hey did you follow my steps on page 2 on this thread since that lists the steps you need to take.

If you are having problems or feel uncomfortable doing the upgrade steps I have re-iterated many times that I am happy to assist (if you are in wellington, or prepared to cover the costs of me sending the router down to chch).  I accept it's not for the faint of heart  but hey, this is geekzone so I expect a little bit of geek-ability, or the willing to try.  The stock Linksys firmware that comes on a WRT54GL is rubbish and you will still have the dropout issues on that firmware, hence why I say you need to ugprade to DD-WRT (which is free!).

If you want me to get your router loaded with DD-WRT then PM me and we will see what I can do to help.

When I buy a new WRT54GL I bin the CD straight away, it's not worth wasting your time with it.





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  Reply # 141317 29-Jun-2008 20:41
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The new firmware for the Linksys certainly does help with having a more stable router on the TCL network as I can personally vouch for. But I suspect that even without that firmware, the router should be configurable without any software, just by pointing your browser at the IP address of the router (and of course making sure your PC is in the same subnet as the router IP address).




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  Reply # 141630 30-Jun-2008 19:22
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Thanks to both of you for your responses.

BarTender - as far as I can tell, I followed your detailed process except that I did not attempt your suggested download and flashing of the system with 3rd party software. I enthusiastically support Linux anfd open source software. I acknowledge your offer to load the software (very generous and I mean that), but that's where the task starts. I just want(ed) a simple system that would not involve all the added work and uncertainties (ongoing) of third party software, working back to the web-site of its volunteer enthusiasts etc, and would provide a very small home network based on Telstra with minimum hassles.

If the CD and firmware are rubbish (I can confirm the CD is rubbish) this product should not be sold. Indeed it wouldn't be lawful to do so. If they are not rubbish (and I see the second responder says it works OK) then it should work pretty much as promised. The point of my post was to let others who (as I had) looked at this discussion know that it doesn't work easily or even at all.

With the one exception I noted. neither my pc or laptop (running different firewalls and antivirus, and also in each case with those turned off) could see beyond the Telstra modem to ping the router or bring up the browser page to set router settings. The one time it did work, it all turned to custard on trying to set the wireless side up. No setting or re-setting of Network connections makes any difference.

So thanks for your interest but I am off out of here. There may be a cheap router soon on Trademe, or I may get my $100 value back in a more satisfying way with a sledgehammer. The second is more likely!


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  Reply # 141673 30-Jun-2008 20:52
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mandarin: If the CD and firmware are rubbish (I can confirm the CD is rubbish) this product should not be sold. Indeed it wouldn't be lawful to do so. If they are not rubbish (and I see the second responder says it works OK) then it should work pretty much as promised. The point of my post was to let others who (as I had) looked at this discussion know that it doesn't work easily or even at all.


I disagree with this mentatilty on so many levels....

You can buy a PC, and it comes pre-loaded with Windows doesn't mean your stuck with it.  You can run Linux, NetWare (for those who remember), FreeBSD, OSX (if you find a dodgy version ;), or even DOS if that takes your fancy!.  Does that make the PC not worth buying, or the fact that they supply the desktop with Windows a reason to return it saying that it doesn't work.  Just because Linksys supply their routers with functionally ok, but not capbible with the ARP traffic on cable networks doesn't make the hardware at fault, more like the software.  Thankfully with the WRT54GL you have an option of firmware(s) you can run..

PM me with your phone number and I will sort you out (if you live in Wellington), and put all your complaining about a faulty router to bed.





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  Reply # 141790 1-Jul-2008 09:20
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Just a thing about the ablity of domestic routers on DOCSIS networks, and ARP traffic levels. I have done a bit of a survey from a few parts of the planet, and it seems pretty much only TCL run a simple bridge type topology that leaves clients swimming in ARP requests. Most if not all DOCSIS operators moved to router segmented nodes years ago to combat this issue, hence the reason why we find cable modem routers sold with no indication that they will fall over every 10minutes due to ARP floods, it only seems an issue here.

Thankfully it would seem that TCL are about to takle this issue, about time I say, in which case any basic domestic router will happily play ball for weeks on end just as they do in the states, Aus and Europe.

Cyril

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  Reply # 142042 1-Jul-2008 21:20
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Thanks. A couple of more hours, a router reset, a re-read of 100pp of user manual, and it is up and works with the firmware. I may well in time move on to 3rd party as Bar Tender suggests - my point has been misunderstood. You should be able to START with it out of the box and working, as a pc with Windows will (usually) do. THEN you go on to the better stuff if and when you have the time for it. Cheers!

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  Reply # 142562 3-Jul-2008 15:18
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Hi Guys - I have used a Linksys WRT54G (Yes not the GL, DOH) for 6 months with occasional hang ups on my TCL connection.  Didn't read the GZ thread close enough and brought the wrong model on trademe for about $75.  Basically ran pretty sweetly until 3 weeks ago.
So went to local DSE and brought Linksys RangePlus Wireless-N Router. Easiest possible setup ever - Am not a complete newbie but even my grandma could of installed this. it scanned the current setup and then applied them to new router automatically. Hasn't fallen over yet - Touch wood. But I do recommend it (so far) as I found the WRT54GL was getting harder to come across. Must admit only tried Trade me, norman ross & DSE. Side note it does look a lot sexier too.

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  Reply # 147540 13-Jul-2008 20:40
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I find this thread fascinating and only wish I had read it before I bought a DLink DIR 300 wireless router, which has consumed the better part of a day and is about to be returned to Noel Leemings as a non functioning toy.  I cannot get it to get a DHCP address from the Telstra Cable modem no matter how hard I try.  I have upgraded the firmware but no joy.  I have to ask myself how hard can it be and what am I doing wrong??

John

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  Reply # 147546 13-Jul-2008 20:49
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You configure the WAN interface of the router with the static IP address, mask, gateway etc. as supplied by Telstra Clear.




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  Reply # 147551 13-Jul-2008 20:52
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prevaljo: I find this thread fascinating and only wish I had read it before I bought a DLink DIR 300 wireless router, which has consumed the better part of a day and is about to be returned to Noel Leemings as a non functioning toy.  I cannot get it to get a DHCP address from the Telstra Cable modem no matter how hard I try.  I have upgraded the firmware but no joy.  I have to ask myself how hard can it be and what am I doing wrong??

John


You will NEVER get a DHCP address off your the Cable Modem on the internet side (you will however on the Cable TV Cable modem, but it won't do you any good).  You need to specify your Static IP Address you were given by TCL when they did the first install.  Normally the techs write down the relevant numbers on the Motorolla Cable Modem box and leave it sitting next to your Internet Cable Modem.  Otherwise it should still be in your PC on the Ethernet Interface (unless you have already change it to DHCP).

If you don't have the IP Address then you will need to ring up TCL and ask them what it is. 

What you will need to set is:
IP Address = x.x.x.x
Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway / Router = x.x.x.1 (the first three numbers are the same as your IP Address)
DNS Server = 203.96.152.4 &  203.96.152.12







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