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671 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 161685 2-Sep-2008 21:08
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gehenna:
Screeb: There's a potential problem with this... net neutrality. If TelstraClear (or any other ISP) makes a commercial deal with Apple to remove the data usage, then it breaks net neutrality, because it disadvantages iTunes' competitors. I don't think the ComCom would be too happy about that.


I think you're on the wrong track.  Lots of ISPs offer free local/national traffic.  Our business plan has free national traffic 24/7 and free international off-peak.  ISP's are in competition with each other and its this type of competitive service that ensures their success in the market.  I see what you're saying about net neutrality but I'm not sure it applies here.  As far as I'm concerned, servers based within NZ SHOULD provide better service than those overseas.  After all, we can pretty much guarantee speeds within the country.  Once we leave our shores we're at the mercy of the international pipes.  ISPs should be supporting those services within NZ.  If we were being offered a guaranteed Mbps rate to a server in Australia or Europe or America, THEN i'd be a bit wary of the net neutrality argument.


You misunderstand. If it was just free national traffic (ALL national traffic), then that's perfectly fine by anyone's standards. My comment was referring to free traffic for iTunes explicitly.


morat:
I disagree.  While I can see where you're coming from, I think this would be more akin to a web based company ensuring that visitors to its site get a better experience by buying a bigger pipe to the net.

There is an exchange of data occuring between iTunes and the customer. Only one end of the link is being charged for this exchange, and  no changes are being made to any other site's service.

Net neutrality is only broken if you're paying to improve your service _at the expense of others_. If you pay extra to get better service with no impact on anyone else, this is perfectly normal.


I guess you're right. I still have a feeling it goes against net neutrality just a little bit though. It essentially creates a tiered internet, where the big players are able to afford to pay ISPs to deliver a superior service, meanwhile for the smaller ones it's uneconomical because their customers will have to pay for the data. I dunno, maybe that's not against net neutrality. I just wish that ALL traffic (or at least all national traffic) was unlimited.

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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 161808 3-Sep-2008 11:50
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I don't get it - what would be in it for TelstraClear to zero-rate traffic to iTunes?? You may as well say "Well I'd use YouTube a lot more if you didn't count that towards my balance". Why iTunes? Why would you expect TelstraClear to just carry the cost for you? Does not compute?

 
 
 
 


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Master Geek


  Reply # 161838 3-Sep-2008 13:28
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steve98: I don't get it - what would be in it for TelstraClear to zero-rate traffic to iTunes?? You may as well say "Well I'd use YouTube a lot more if you didn't count that towards my balance". Why iTunes? Why would you expect TelstraClear to just carry the cost for you? Does not compute?

More people may choose to sign up to TelstraClear broadband if it didn't count towards their cap.

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  Reply # 161841 3-Sep-2008 13:43
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benny:
steve98: I don't get it - what would be in it for TelstraClear to zero-rate traffic to iTunes?? You may as well say "Well I'd use YouTube a lot more if you didn't count that towards my balance". Why iTunes? Why would you expect TelstraClear to just carry the cost for you? Does not compute?

More people may choose to sign up to TelstraClear broadband if it didn't count towards their cap.


I really doubt that it would be a good business decision for TelstraClear. Now that iTunes includes movies that are around 1GB each they could end up carrying the cost of lots of gigs of international traffic for heavy users. It would make more sense, in my opinion, to offer this on something domestic like TVNZOnDemand.

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Ultimate Geek


  Reply # 161881 3-Sep-2008 15:30
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I can see the sense in perhaps offering free downloads from a local server, but I agree that doing deals with specific companies (e.g. Apple) could lead down a slippery slope whereby ISPs can influence which web-sites/services their customers use.  I'd prefer to keep ISPs out of that space.

By itself, the deal with iTunes might not be too bad.  Then what if all ISPs decided to do the same thing in response?  This would make iTunes much cheaper than any other music/video store (because you don't have to pay for the bandwidth) and lead to a monopoly - which only does one thing for consumer prices.


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  Reply # 163373 9-Sep-2008 21:00
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After buying my first iPod 3 weeks ago and nearly hitting my cap just with podcasts, I really thing all NZ ISPs should get with the program and realise the future consists of streaming media etc... a 10mbit connection with a 20 gig cap is pointless but I can't afford to go higher than the $130 a moth I'm paying for that and a phone line! And to think the Americans are whining about being capped at 250 gig!!

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Master Geek

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  Reply # 163398 9-Sep-2008 23:01
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steve98:
benny:
steve98: I don't get it - what would be in it for TelstraClear to zero-rate traffic to iTunes?? You may as well say "Well I'd use YouTube a lot more if you didn't count that towards my balance". Why iTunes? Why would you expect TelstraClear to just carry the cost for you? Does not compute?

More people may choose to sign up to TelstraClear broadband if it didn't count towards their cap.




I really doubt that it would be a good business decision for TelstraClear. Now that iTunes includes movies that are around 1GB each they could end up carrying the cost of lots of gigs of international traffic for heavy users. It would make more sense, in my opinion, to offer this on something domestic like TVNZOnDemand.

Isn't most of the data that is on iTunes distributed by Akamai? So no doubt that traffic would already be in NZ?

I see this deal being no different to the arrangement Xnet has with Gameplanet. That deal being that for Xnet customers, all traffic to/from Gameplanet game servers, download servers etc is zero-rated. A bit of exclusivity never hurt anyone :p

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Geek
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  Reply # 165017 17-Sep-2008 09:15
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blakamin: After buying my first iPod 3 weeks ago and nearly hitting my cap just with podcasts, I really thing all NZ ISPs should get with the program and realise the future consists of streaming media etc... a 10mbit connection with a 20 gig cap is pointless but I can't afford to go higher than the $130 a moth I'm paying for that and a phone line! And to think the Americans are whining about being capped at 250 gig!!


When the international fibre owners get with the program and drop their charges by an order of magnitude or two, I suspect NZ ISPs will get with the program and massively drop their bandwidth pricing.

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 165119 17-Sep-2008 17:25
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morat:
blakamin: After buying my first iPod 3 weeks ago and nearly hitting my cap just with podcasts, I really thing all NZ ISPs should get with the program and realise the future consists of streaming media etc... a 10mbit connection with a 20 gig cap is pointless but I can't afford to go higher than the $130 a moth I'm paying for that and a phone line! And to think the Americans are whining about being capped at 250 gig!!


When the international fibre owners get with the program and drop their charges by an order of magnitude or two, I suspect NZ ISPs will get with the program and massively drop their bandwidth pricing.


That's not happening any time soon. The only good route out of NZ in the direction of the US (read: effective monopoly) is the Southern Cross Cable, which is half owned by Telecom.

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Master Geek


  Reply # 165428 18-Sep-2008 17:26
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Dude how many of those isps that you where talking about are located in america?

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