Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 
725 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 130


  Reply # 176155 5-Nov-2008 16:49
Send private message


Ha! Don't count on it dude, with the types of people leaving (i.e. low usage users) it's only going to free up a small amount of bandwidth, plus there will be a steady increase in "leech" type users due to tightening of copyright laws.

Xnet will be seen as a haven for downloaders (like you) so the likely outcome is even less bandwidth to go around.  Think about it....


FWIW, I don't download much - just linux ISO's (no, for real!) and updates for my O/S - although using Arch linux, the updates come thick and fast. One advantage of free open-source software is the absence of desire or need to use pirate software - I recommend it! I guess I go through some data watching streaming video from news sites, the daily show, youtube and tomshardware. And national radio and radiosport.

I download less than 10GB most months, which is why I like the pay-per-GB policy of Xnet. I'm also sticking with Xnet (for now) because - youtube and other video streams aside - the speeds are acceptable. Comon' Xnet - let's get the international streaming stuff sorted, OK? Oh, and I use naked DSL and VFx - no cursed Telecom for me!


Don't forget to take into account the fact the Xnet legally has to dob you in if it suspects you may be downloading copyright material ("no we would never snoop our users traffic, even if their usage was detrimental to the network"), ROFLMAO!!!!, dude if there was ever an easier way to get rid of "problem" customers.


I wasn't forgetting this. It's this intrusive policy which means I'm surprised there are so many P2P and torrenters still on Xnet. I suppose encrypting clients and private networks and torrent sites are easy enough to use though *not that I'd know how. Ahem*

Xnet (and every other ISP) will be looking for ways to cut costs (due to increased infrastructure costs), the only ISPs that are likely to be able to afford decent amounts of bandwidth (and also make a profit from it) are the companies that own international connections - i.e Telecom / Telstra.  Unless the government steps in... good luck if National get in (which they will)...


In business only the strong / good survive. If you continue to offer a service which users are willing to pay whatever dollar for, and you make a dime, you stay in business even when times are tough. If your service craps out, then no matter how cheap it is, no customers will be happy or stay, and therefore you lose. I really hope Xnet won't fall into this trap. So far, personally, so good - but if these threads are to be any guide, then they may have fallen into the classic (NZ ISP) trap of reaching beyond their grasp.

8020 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 387

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 176185 5-Nov-2008 19:51
Send private message

I really hope Xnet won't fall into this trap.


They already have, I guess you missed the part where the service has been un-usable for anything latency sensitive or general internet use way too often in the last 11 months.  In my eye's and many others they have probably done irreparable damage to their brand.

 
 
 
 


Try Wrike: fast, easy, and efficient project collaboration software
131 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 176211 5-Nov-2008 21:38
Send private message

holmesr: and I thought I might seek other peoples opinions before I commit to anything, what is the service like etc we were with Xtra/Telecom beforehand and always got highly reliable speeds with them. Is there any contracts to agree to etc? any help in this would be greatly appreciated and I would head to the website myself except I'm on dial-up at this current point in time and these things are quite painful to load TIA


I wouldn't recommend them becuase their email support is hopeless. I am still waiting for a reply from over a month ago, and I have followed it up several times. 

 

I hadn't realised they had added a $99 disconnection fee. I assume that doesn't apply to those who signed up prior to them adding it . I think that is an anticompetitive move.


1 | 2 
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Opera launches new mobile browser: Opera Touch
Posted 25-Apr-2018 20:45


TCF and Telcos Toughen Up on Scam Callers
Posted 23-Apr-2018 09:39


Amazon launches the International Shopping Experience in the Amazon Shopping App
Posted 19-Apr-2018 08:38


Spark New Zealand and TVNZ to bring coverage of Rugby World Cup 2019
Posted 16-Apr-2018 06:55


How Google can seize Microsoft Office crown
Posted 14-Apr-2018 11:08


How back office transformation drives IRD efficiency
Posted 12-Apr-2018 21:15


iPod laws in a smartphone world: will we ever get copyright right?
Posted 12-Apr-2018 21:13


Lightbox service using big data and analytics to learn more about customers
Posted 9-Apr-2018 12:11


111 mobile caller location extended to iOS
Posted 6-Apr-2018 13:50


Huawei announces the HUAWEI P20 series
Posted 29-Mar-2018 11:41


Symantec Internet Security Threat Report shows increased endpoint technology risks
Posted 26-Mar-2018 18:29


Spark switches on long-range IoT network across New Zealand
Posted 26-Mar-2018 18:22


Stuff Pix enters streaming video market
Posted 21-Mar-2018 09:18


Windows no longer Microsoft’s main focus
Posted 13-Mar-2018 07:47


Why phone makers are obsessed with cameras
Posted 11-Mar-2018 12:25



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.