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Topic # 57965 2-Mar-2010 19:46
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Just seen a piece about Wireless Futures on Target tonight and they were selling something called a Sim Dialer that somehow bypasses the cell network to get cheaper calling.

Can anyone explain what these are and how they work? (and are they illegal?)

Thanks.

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  Reply # 303772 2-Mar-2010 20:04
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No they are not legal

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  Reply # 303774 2-Mar-2010 20:12
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You can call countries like Australia, USA, UK etc from your mobile using a calling card for 3.9c per minute and a 19c connection fee. It seems pointless to go to the effort of using a SIM dialler to achieve the same end result!

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 303776 2-Mar-2010 20:20
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So what does the sim dialler actually do, does it damage your phone or anything?

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  Reply # 303782 2-Mar-2010 20:36
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It seems its more 'convenience' over 'something new'.. as mentioned above a calling card will achieve the same thing. A sim dialler probably just means you don't have to keep getting a new card or topping it up. Still, attaching something to your sim card sounds dodge and may break your carriers t&c's.




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  Reply # 303835 2-Mar-2010 23:24
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johnr: No they are not legal

Just out of interest, which law do they break?

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  Reply # 303852 3-Mar-2010 01:30
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They don't break any actual laws. They do, however, violate your agreement.




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  Reply # 303897 3-Mar-2010 10:28
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what if it is used on a prepay mobile??

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  Reply # 303911 3-Mar-2010 10:56
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Then I'd wager that they break the prepaid agreement.

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  Reply # 303915 3-Mar-2010 11:04
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Does anyone actually know how it works though?

It obviously still uses the original network operators cell tower... but how does it bypass the charge to the original carrier?

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  Reply # 303916 3-Mar-2010 11:07
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Kyanar: They don't break any actual laws. They do, however, violate your agreement.


Which is quite different from what John is saying! :)

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  Reply # 303939 3-Mar-2010 12:04
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And what part of the agreement do they violate?

Based on how hard it was for a friend to get their sim unlocker to fit on the sim and into their US iPhone, I can see a lot of broken sims and phones if they become popular.




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  Reply # 303962 3-Mar-2010 13:10
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sbiddle: You can call countries like Australia, USA, UK etc from your mobile using a calling card for 3.9c per minute and a 19c connection fee. It seems pointless to go to the effort of using a SIM dialler to achieve the same end result!


But is this calling FROM the mobile? My old Ericsson and Nokia cdma phone have a built-in calling card feature, you kay in the calling card access number and PIN and press and hold the talk key to make a "card call" which dials all the numbers for you. Used to use it a lot with Yabba back in the day.

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  Reply # 303978 3-Mar-2010 13:54
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The only reason you would use one is if your current mobile carrier is not giving you a good deal to a large number of locations that you call frequently. If they become popular it means something is broken and BADLY.
if you have a specific location that calling cards or call back features help with then maybe it is an option, but as has been mentioned a calling card will do the trick.




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  Reply # 303984 3-Mar-2010 14:15
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simon14: Does anyone actually know how it works though?

It obviously still uses the original network operators cell tower... but how does it bypass the charge to the original carrier?


I believe they 'automatically' prefix a call you make with an access number and PIN for a calling card service, thereby rerouting your call while allowing you to continue to use the numbers programmed into your address book (the downside to normal calling card services).

Usually most useful where the calling card access service number is charged at a low rate (or effectively free because its part of a large bundle of minutes), for calling more expensive numbers eg international.




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  Reply # 303992 3-Mar-2010 15:11
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I wouldn't mine one actually, I use dialing rules a lot from my mobile, I can't see how they are not legal though I assume they inject some code similar to a mod chip. I have a few similar devices, a dual SIM adapter, carrier emulators for locked handsets and similar.

I'd also like to intercept the comms of one and see exactly what they actually convert.

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