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Ultimate Geek
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Topic # 193552 15-Mar-2016 04:47
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Geekzoners!

 

Have a client who would like to offer free wifi to "their clients" or effectively anyone within range of their access points.

 

There are a number of ISP's who provide "unlimited" data connections, however without looking into the fine print does anyone happen to know if there are any explicit terms and connections with a given ISP suggesting their connection could not be used for such an activity. 

 

The access point(s) would be rate limited and content filtered and of course in theory there is a maximum data amount the connection its self could possible transfer (RX/TX).

 

Would love any suggestions or options.

 

Cheers

 

Lee


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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1513471 15-Mar-2016 08:22
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Make sure IP separation is turned on.

 

 





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  Reply # 1513475 15-Mar-2016 08:27
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Well it might be against the ts and Cs of many ISPs, but really are any of them going to care? Not likely.

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  Reply # 1513584 15-Mar-2016 11:02
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sampler: Geekzoners!

 

Have a client who would like to offer free wifi to "their clients" or effectively anyone within range of their access points. 

 

 

I'm not sure why you have "their clients" in quotes as though it's a euphemism or something? Are they providing public access?

 

Your client should look at TICSA - the Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Act 2013 to see whether the access they plan to provide results in them being classified as a "network operator" or "service provider" under the Act. If it does, they may have a number of obligations including registering the service with the Police and providing certain information to the Police, GCSB and/or NCSC.




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1513599 15-Mar-2016 11:27
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stevenz:
Make sure IP separation is turned on.

 

Yup would look to enable full isolation within the network, would also be a brand new network within the building not connected in any shape or form (apart from power) to their current systems

 


NonprayingMantis:
Well it might be against the ts and Cs of many ISPs, but really are any of them going to care? Not likely.

 

Was along the lines of what I would expect, they are not using it to advertise or derive any form of revenue just add to the offerings others within the same area have already done.

 

 

 

 




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1513616 15-Mar-2016 11:35
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andrew027:

 

sampler: Geekzoners!

 

Have a client who would like to offer free wifi to "their clients" or effectively anyone within range of their access points. 

 

 

I'm not sure why you have "their clients" in quotes as though it's a euphemism or something? Are they providing public access?

 

Your client should look at TICSA - the Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Act 2013 to see whether the access they plan to provide results in them being classified as a "network operator" or "service provider" under the Act. If it does, they may have a number of obligations including registering the service with the Police and providing certain information to the Police, GCSB and/or NCSC.

 

 

"their clients" being people who are in their building at the time or in the local area within the range of the access points.

 

I would see their obligations as no different to any business offering access to the internet via company owned/operated property. Willing to be totally ignorant for the sake of learning more; What hoops do motels, BP Express, the local library and the town square free wifi need to comply with beyond their upstream provider (ISP's) own rules ?   if its just about the ability to intercept traffic that going to depend on the abilities of the router, or would that also fall back on the upstream provider ?

 

Cheers

 

Lee


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