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Topic # 205699 23-Nov-2016 16:36
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The UK Chancellor announced that 5G will be rolled out in the near future and apparently Bournemouth of all places will get it first.

What are NZ's plans for 5G?





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  Reply # 1676232 23-Nov-2016 16:47
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We have only just got our 4G rolled out in most places and your already thinking about 5G!!!

 

If Telecom and the XT network was anything to go off maybe a couple decades :).

 

But in all honesty i dont see the requirement. We cant even use 4G to a level to justify any form of upgrade.





 


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  Reply # 1676242 23-Nov-2016 16:51
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Think 2019 / 2020 NZ will see something

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  Reply # 1676247 23-Nov-2016 16:56
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Can you tell me what "5G" actually is....

 

http://www.rcrwireless.com/20160719/internet-of-things/5g-standards-process-tag31-tag99

 

Come back in 2019/20 when the Standards have been agreed to,

 

Until then its gonna be like the wild west, or pretty much a rerun of the 3G in the early 2000s  with CDMA/WiMAX/UTMS etc


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  Reply # 1676288 23-Nov-2016 18:16
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Yes its true that "5G" is not defined as yet. I'm aware that industry and others are working on things behind the scenes in terms of technology in country.

 

On spectrum matters, NZ inc is involved with the process internationally. I can't speak officially on where we are at (I feel like the person in the PA media releases quoting sources that can't be officially named), but NZ is there, making sure that our voice is heard and hopefully the best outcomes are achieved for the country.


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  Reply # 1676293 23-Nov-2016 18:33
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Look that the LTE band plan for FDD / TDD it's like band plan soup!

 

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  Reply # 1677092 24-Nov-2016 22:40
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I can't tell you what 5G is. As a humble user of phones, like most non-phone techs, to me 3G is 3G and 4G is 4G and so on - we lay persons assume that it is an internationally agreed standard that applies everywhere because that is exactly what it sounds like!

 

All I can tell you is that the UK Chancellor set aside some NZ$2 billion equivalent for it and this site is what the UK seems to think it is...! The quote below is from that site and probably means more to y'all than it does to me!

 

"In December 2014 the GSMA outlined eight criteria for 5G. A network connection should meet a majority of the eight in order to qualify as 5G:

 

1-10Gbps connections to end points in the field (i.e. not theoretical maximum)
1 millisecond end-to-end round trip delay (latency)
1000x bandwidth per unit area
10-100x number of connected devices
(Perception of) 99.999% availability
(Perception of) 100% coverage
90% reduction in network energy usage
Up to 10 year battery life for low power, machine-type devices
So, what do all these numbers mean?

 

Speed: 5G will be much, much faster than previous generations. A full HD movie will be able to be downloaded in under 10 seconds, compared with a similar number of minutes over 4G. And that time for 4G is contingent on having peak rates for the duration of the download, which is very rarely the case.

 

Latency: The response time will be significantly better, at 1 millisecond compared with the current rate of around 50 with 4G. Instead of waiting for a movie to download before it can be watched, play will begin almost, if not, instantaneously.

 

User experience: Because of the substantial improvements to speed and latency, the user will have the perception of limitless bandwidth and continuous availability, wherever they are.

 

Capacity: 5G will provide the bandwidth that will be needed to enable the billions of devices that will be connected to the internet to communicate with each other.

 

Energy: 5G will need to be cost effective for users and operators, hence the need to achieve significant reductions in energy usage. And there’s no point in having all these great services if your phone runs out of juice, hence the requirement for long battery life, not just for phones but for all devices that could ultimately be connected to the network."






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  Reply # 1677149 25-Nov-2016 07:18
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Geektastic:

 

I can't tell you what 5G is. As a humble user of phones, like most non-phone techs, to me 3G is 3G and 4G is 4G and so on - we lay persons assume that it is an internationally agreed standard that applies everywhere because that is exactly what it sounds like!

 

All I can tell you is that the UK Chancellor set aside some NZ$2 billion equivalent for it and this site is what the UK seems to think it is...! The quote below is from that site and probably means more to y'all than it does to me!

 

 

It doesn't matter than the UK Chancellor thinks, a 3GPP and ITU don't expect to have ratified 5G technology standard until around 2020. We may see some pre 5G networks before then, but that's really all just talk at present.

 

The assumption that "everybody will be the same" is also not going to happen. Like 4G/LTE now that has huge fragmentation globally due to the many different bands in use, things will only get a lot worse with 5G until technology can advance to the point where a handset capable of ~20 different bands can be built.

 

 


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  Reply # 1703313 14-Jan-2017 22:24
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I was in the UK about 18 months ago and I was very surprised to find that two major carriers (Vodafone and EE) still had huge areas lacking 3G and 4G service.

 

I caught the train between London and Manchester a few times (1-2 trips when I was roaming on VFUK using my VFNZ SIM and another 1-2 trips using my EE SIM) and watching Netflix (even at the lowest bitrates) was impossible on both networks due to the frequent handing over 2G<->3G<->4G and general congestion issues (especially in the many areas where 2G was the only available option).

 

Meanwhile over the channel I travelled all the way from Paris to Bucharest via several countries with fast 4G coverage ~90% of the time on various network (both VFNZ and EEUK's roaming partners). Where 4G was not available the 3G service were always very good as well. On overnight trains I would just watch Netflix and it would just play flawlessly at HD resolutions.

 

I would suggest to the UK networks they focus on getting 4G or even 3G rolled out across their entire network before they even think about 5G.


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  Reply # 1703314 14-Jan-2017 22:30
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A lot has changed in 18 months then I was in UK September / October 2016 and had good 4G coverage around England / Wales / France going back in May 2017 so will be be interested to see how much it's expanded

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  Reply # 1703317 14-Jan-2017 22:32
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KiwiSurfer:

 

I was in the UK about 18 months ago and I was very surprised to find that two major carriers (Vodafone and EE) still had huge areas lacking 3G and 4G service.

 

I caught the train between London and Manchester a few times (1-2 trips when I was roaming on VFUK using my VFNZ SIM and another 1-2 trips using my EE SIM) and watching Netflix (even at the lowest bitrates) was impossible on both networks due to the frequent handing over 2G<->3G<->4G and general congestion issues (especially in the many areas where 2G was the only available option).

 

Meanwhile over the channel I travelled all the way from Paris to Bucharest via several countries with fast 4G coverage ~90% of the time on various network (both VFNZ and EEUK's roaming partners). Where 4G was not available the 3G service were always very good as well. On overnight trains I would just watch Netflix and it would just play flawlessly at HD resolutions.

 

I would suggest to the UK networks they focus on getting 4G or even 3G rolled out across their entire network before they even think about 5G.

 

 

Do you know how hard it is to provide cellular coverage to a moving train? Think of 1000 devices hitting a cell tower at once, for a short period of time and demanding to connect for the next few seconds of netflix / spotify?

 

Ofcom and others are trying to work on solutions, but one is to outsource the provision of connectivity (ie Wi-FI) to the train operators. They then have to deal with the problem, rather than the cellular operators directly. Lots of money needs to be thrown at it, but going to take time to make it work.

 

 

 

Edit: Grammar


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  Reply # 1703334 14-Jan-2017 23:35
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knoydart:

 

Do you know how hard it is to provide cellular coverage to a moving train? Think of 1000 devices hitting a cell tower at once, for a short period of time and demanding to connect for the next few seconds of netflix / spotify?

 

4G networks in Europe seemed to cope fine with that use case as I got good 4G speeds travelling on packed trains within the metro centres of cities like Paris, Zurich, Budapest, Istanbul, etc all the way out to rural areas. In my travels the UK networks stand out as being the only country where my phone would drop down to 2G on a regular basis. Mainline train stations, main roads, main streets in large towns and other places where one would expect 3G at the least. In the other countries I went to (Europe plus Iceland and the US) I only ever saw 2G in the most isolated spots—it was 4G or 3G at the very least almost everywhere else. Even AT&T in the US seemed to be reasonably good and they were the second worst on my travels.

 

Ofcom and others are trying to work on solutions, but one is to outsource the provision of connectivity (ie Wi-FI) to the train operators. They then have to deal with the problem, rather than the cellular operators directly. Lots of money needs to be thrown at it, but going to take time to make it work.

 

I understand some TOCs are using mobile backhaul which won't solve the problem. I don't see any other way the TOCs could provide WiFi as the spectrum the railways have can only be used for their own comms. I suspect the larger issue is the low revenue the networks in the UK get which limits how much they can spend on network upgrades. I am no longer envious of how people in the UK can get unlimited plans for only a couple of pounds in the UK after seeing the downside of that. I came back to NZ feeling a lot better about how much we spend on our mobile plans. It may be a bit on the high side but at least we see a lot more investment into both coverage, the latest tech as well as capacity.

 

 


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  Reply # 1703361 15-Jan-2017 09:01
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i had to update from a 3 year old phone just to get coverage with all the new bands of the 4g (the bloody bands mutated!) because 3g/4g on my phone became useless for some reason ... please i don't want to have to buy another phone just to have normal coverage





Swype on iOS is detrimental to accurate typing. Apologies in advance.


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  Reply # 1703383 15-Jan-2017 09:32
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Another radio technology being rolled out by AT&T in the US.

 

 

 

http://www.dslreports.com/shownews/ATT-Promising-Gigabit-Speeds-From-UtilityPole-Antennas-138696


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  Reply # 1703421 15-Jan-2017 10:41
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ajw:

 

Another radio technology being rolled out by AT&T in the US.

 

 

 

http://www.dslreports.com/shownews/ATT-Promising-Gigabit-Speeds-From-UtilityPole-Antennas-138696

 

 

It's really just like Google Fiber now turning into Google Wireless because the cost of deploying fibre is too expensive to ever generate a ROI.

 

 


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  Reply # 1703892 16-Jan-2017 07:45
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KiwiSurfer:

 

I came back to NZ feeling a lot better about how much we spend on our mobile plans. It may be a bit on the high side but at least we see a lot more investment into both coverage, the latest tech as well as capacity.

 

 

 

 

This, I noticed in the US a few years ago the coverage was very good but the speeds rubbish. That is what happens with saturation, I guess the UK has the same issue.


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