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  Reply # 1249718 2-Mar-2015 19:12
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Yealink W52P is the perfect phone for a home situtation. The Gigaset's aren't bad but really don't compare with the Yealink alternative.

Far FAR better than sticking a phone on the end of an ATA. You will get G.722 for starters. Proper MWI which will allow you to use your provider's voicemail services which is always better than using the local built in mailboxes - there is always issues getting MWI working from an ATA to a cordless phone. I just don't see the point at all in taking a SIP connection and converting it to Analogue when there are products available that let you do it natively.

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  Reply # 1249787 2-Mar-2015 20:41
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I've got a Gigaset C610 IP with 2talk. Works really well. It was a replacement for a grandstream ATA which was a POS.

I've also used it on a Nokia E60 - a wifi cellphone with a built in SIP client. Really nice system, but as others have said, heavy on the battery.

The economics of naked broadband plus separate VOIP service are definitely shifting though. Depending on your usage, you will pay $7 (minimum) - $10 (with calls) to 2talk. More if you're a really heavy user. Some providers now offer a phone line for what works out to be around $20 a month (perhaps even less if you bundle with other stuff). As far as I know, it's usually a VOIP line using an inbuilt ATA in the router, or even a router with a handset. 

Assuming $10 a month more in phone rental, and $200-ish for a decent VOIP handset, that means that's 20 months before you're in the black. Throw in the time and effort to set up (and fix the setup yourself when it goes wrong), and it's not quite the no-brainer it once was when a basic phone line was $45.

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1249833 2-Mar-2015 21:21
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You still get the massive post dial delays on a analog dect and ata combo that you get on an analog line, whereas the native voip dect ones will be processing the call as soon as you hit the green button, none of that off hook, wait, then bleep out the DTMF tones nonsense of emulating legacy technology.




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  Reply # 1249893 2-Mar-2015 22:12
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chevrolux: Yealink W52P is the perfect phone for a home situtation. The Gigaset's aren't bad but really don't compare with the Yealink alternative.

Far FAR better than sticking a phone on the end of an ATA. You will get G.722 for starters. Proper MWI which will allow you to use your provider's voicemail services which is always better than using the local built in mailboxes - there is always issues getting MWI working from an ATA to a cordless phone. I just don't see the point at all in taking a SIP connection and converting it to Analogue when there are products available that let you do it natively.


I don't like Voicemail :-)  Well I don't like having four different voicemail boxes that I need to remember a pin for.

The Yealink does look to be an interesting phone.

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  Reply # 1249968 3-Mar-2015 03:13
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So use the ability to send them as an email that 2talk and a few others provide. Just turns up in your inbox as an attachment




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  Reply # 1250008 3-Mar-2015 09:03
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chevrolux: Yealink W52P is the perfect phone for a home situtation. The Gigaset's aren't bad but really don't compare with the Yealink alternative.

Far FAR better than sticking a phone on the end of an ATA. You will get G.722 for starters. Proper MWI which will allow you to use your provider's voicemail services which is always better than using the local built in mailboxes - there is always issues getting MWI working from an ATA to a cordless phone. I just don't see the point at all in taking a SIP connection and converting it to Analogue when there are products available that let you do it natively.


I have a Yealink W52P which I have used for a couple of years now. While I have had now issues with it the thing that surprised me about it is the poor build quality, overall it feels flimsy when compared to my Uniden cordless phones (not VOIP) which were a lot cheaper.




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  Reply # 1250010 3-Mar-2015 09:05
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Glassboy:
chevrolux: Yealink W52P is the perfect phone for a home situtation. The Gigaset's aren't bad but really don't compare with the Yealink alternative.

Far FAR better than sticking a phone on the end of an ATA. You will get G.722 for starters. Proper MWI which will allow you to use your provider's voicemail services which is always better than using the local built in mailboxes - there is always issues getting MWI working from an ATA to a cordless phone. I just don't see the point at all in taking a SIP connection and converting it to Analogue when there are products available that let you do it natively.


I don't like Voicemail :-)  Well I don't like having four different voicemail boxes that I need to remember a pin for.

The Yealink does look to be an interesting phone.


That's exactly my point then. With the yealink you could have up to 4 sip accounts which you would get MWI directly on the handset. try doing that with an ATA. No PIN required when dialing from your number. Also, as richms said, setting up voicemail-to-email sorts it quite nicely too.

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  Reply # 1250014 3-Mar-2015 09:08
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Dulouz:
chevrolux: Yealink W52P is the perfect phone for a home situtation. The Gigaset's aren't bad but really don't compare with the Yealink alternative.

Far FAR better than sticking a phone on the end of an ATA. You will get G.722 for starters. Proper MWI which will allow you to use your provider's voicemail services which is always better than using the local built in mailboxes - there is always issues getting MWI working from an ATA to a cordless phone. I just don't see the point at all in taking a SIP connection and converting it to Analogue when there are products available that let you do it natively.


I have a Yealink W52P which I have used for a couple of years now. While I have had now issues with it the thing that surprised me about it is the poor build quality, overall it feels flimsy when compared to my Uniden cordless phones (not VOIP) which were a lot cheaper.


The handsets are quite light but I don't think that shows poor build quality. Like you mentioned, have you had anything break on them? I've put quite a few out there and haven't any issues - the only thing I have had once or twice were dead batteries that wouldn't charge, very easy to fix.

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  Reply # 1250016 3-Mar-2015 09:13
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chevrolux:
Dulouz:
chevrolux: Yealink W52P is the perfect phone for a home situtation. The Gigaset's aren't bad but really don't compare with the Yealink alternative.

Far FAR better than sticking a phone on the end of an ATA. You will get G.722 for starters. Proper MWI which will allow you to use your provider's voicemail services which is always better than using the local built in mailboxes - there is always issues getting MWI working from an ATA to a cordless phone. I just don't see the point at all in taking a SIP connection and converting it to Analogue when there are products available that let you do it natively.


I have a Yealink W52P which I have used for a couple of years now. While I have had now issues with it the thing that surprised me about it is the poor build quality, overall it feels flimsy when compared to my Uniden cordless phones (not VOIP) which were a lot cheaper.


The handsets are quite light but I don't think that shows poor build quality. Like you mentioned, have you had anything break on them? I've put quite a few out there and haven't any issues - the only thing I have had once or twice were dead batteries that wouldn't charge, very easy to fix.

No nothing has broken, although my impression is if I did drop it it would be likely to be easily damaged. Funny you mention the batteries, while mine haven't died I do find that when the handset is off the base the charge doesn't last very long.




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  Reply # 1250029 3-Mar-2015 09:29
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Gigaset A510IP for the last 4 years here - flawless, had an ATA and Panasonic combo before that, the ATA was I think one of those linksys ones, worst thing I have ever tried to configure, was nightmare, use to cut out and cause call quality, hence getting the Gigaset in 2011 and it worked perfectly.

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  Reply # 1250040 3-Mar-2015 09:44
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Yealink are certainly are not a high end quality phone; but are good quality, performance and features for a great price.
The Panasonic range of IP Phones would be another option, but at a higher price point.





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  Reply # 1250421 3-Mar-2015 17:32
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Note that most fibre connections come with a "free" (no-extra-charge) phone line.  It's delivered over VoIP, but often they won't give you the SIP login/etc -- the demarc point is the phone port on your ONT or ISP-supplied router.  So don't go out and excitedly buy VoIP gear you may not be able to use.


That's one of the nice things about the FRITZ!Box with SNAP.  It's all configured to use their SIP service and getting the credentials etc to connect your own device to their SIP service is not possible but with the FRITZ!Box you don't have to, you just add your SIP device to the FRITZ!Box.  Your device talks SIP to the FRITZ!Box and the FRITZ!Box handles the connection to SNAP.  You get the advantage of an ISP managed device with POTS ports to plug into that just works while still being able to use a SIP device if you wish (even at the same time or even more than one SIP device with internal calling, multiple ITSPs etc).

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