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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1500073 26-Feb-2016 18:18
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SaltyNZ:

 

 Meh. 30s of Googling 'Special Tactics Daniel Ayers' will let you form your own opinion on this call for regulatory response.

 

 

 Or this article: Spat over negative review becomes abusive


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  Reply # 1500074 26-Feb-2016 18:20
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"we traced the call... It's coming from inside your house!"

 

 

 

*insert murder music*

 

 

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1500158 26-Feb-2016 20:28
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Any effort to ban international calls would increase the hacking of PBX systems, but I agree voice providers need to tighten up at least against the "Windows" scammers. A voice provider that receives a scam/malicious call can trace the call back to where it entered the VoIP network so everything basically depends on cooperation of the originating provider and country, along with any network that has been used to run VPNs etc. Unlike analogue calls, VoIP requires correct originating IP address for a 2-way conversation, and VoIP providers can search their logs for details of where the call came from.





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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1500326 27-Feb-2016 12:13
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In addition to tightening up the regulatory framework around VOIP number allocation, a multilateral effort to crack down on such scam operations in countries where they are predominantly base is warranted.

 

A knee-jerk response to impose an outright ban would not resolve this situation and would instead, create a new set of problems with extremely negative consequences.


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  Reply # 1502224 1-Mar-2016 16:06
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What's needed is transition to a global DNS like system for phone numbers, then your PABX could simply look up the equivalent of SenderId/DKIM to check whether the number is legit.

 

Good luck prying number allocation from the cold dead hands of the incumbent telcos though or from individual countries.


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  Reply # 1502342 1-Mar-2016 18:47
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I don't have detailed technical knowledge about phone systems, but how about:

 

  • telcos implement a special number,
  • immediately following receipt a spam call you dial that number to let the telco's systems know it was a spam call
  • logging of reports is automated
  • if their system gets multiple reports that a number, or range of numbers, or mass of calls from a specific VOIP provider is being used for spam then their system automatically registers this
  • their system (possibly automatically, possibly with manual confirmation) then block *all* calls originating from that number, range or provider to anyone on their network; and
  • much like email blacklists, the number/range/provider stays blocked until the provider in question details what they have done to fix the problem.

If every NZ VOIP provider who let scammers use their system was blocked, in whole or in part, from all major telcos within hours of the spamming starting - I imagine they would sharpen up their management to keep their businesses. It would be even better if the major telcos coordinated this to share reports and blocking, like they do for stolen cellphones.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1502356 1-Mar-2016 19:06
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JimmyH:

 

I don't have detailed technical knowledge about phone systems, but how about:

 

  • telcos implement a special number,
  • immediately following receipt a spam call you dial that number to let the telco's systems know it was a spam call
  • logging of reports is automated
  • if their system gets multiple reports that a number, or range of numbers, or mass of calls from a specific VOIP provider is being used for spam then their system automatically registers this
  • their system (possibly automatically, possibly with manual confirmation) then block *all* calls originating from that number, range or provider to anyone on their network; and
  • much like email blacklists, the number/range/provider stays blocked until the provider in question details what they have done to fix the problem.

If every NZ VOIP provider who let scammers use their system was blocked, in whole or in part, from all major telcos within hours of the spamming starting - I imagine they would sharpen up their management to keep their businesses. It would be even better if the major telcos coordinated this to share reports and blocking, like they do for stolen cellphones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The DIA has just such a system already.





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These comments are my own and do not represent the opinions of 2degrees.


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  Reply # 1502713 2-Mar-2016 09:56
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If you look at news like that from the business angle - you may think: who has interest in the article like that? What's in it for them? Is there a new tender for some "upgrades" about to be justified by all means including media?

 

How about banning letters coming in a snailmail which have no return address :-)


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