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# 17737 9-Dec-2007 18:38
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Anyone used Vista Readyboost?

How much does it improve performance in your setup?

Size of ReadyBoost vs system memory size?

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BDFL - Memuneh
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# 99104 9-Dec-2007 19:42
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I have a 16 GB Lexar SSD express card and use 4 GB (the maximum) as ReadyBoost. I can't see any improvement really, but I think ReadyBoost is more adequate for system with resource constraints - which is not my case probably (a laptop with an AMD Turion 64 bit dual core, 2 GB RAM and 160 GB SATA HDD).





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  # 99157 9-Dec-2007 23:54
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ReadyBoost is mostly used and will be useful if you have Primary hard disk index is below 3.0. That helps increase in disk data transfer rate. Its not meant for all systems.All the recent hard disks will have an index > 3.0 nowadays, so getting a hard disk index below 3.0 would be some old hard drive.




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  # 99219 10-Dec-2007 11:48
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I've read that readyboost also doesn't have much effect if you're on a system with great than 1gig of RAM.
1gig or less and it can have quite an improvement.

That's just my understanding from what I've read about the feature.

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  # 99252 10-Dec-2007 15:21
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muppet: I've read that readyboost also doesn't have much effect if you're on a system with great than 1gig of RAM.
1gig or less and it can have quite an improvement. That's just my understanding from what I've read about the feature.


Yes this was my understanding also.




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  # 99254 10-Dec-2007 15:32
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I have used on several systems and not noticed any difference. All my systems are 1GB or 2GB though.







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  # 99267 10-Dec-2007 16:19
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I tried a 2gb usb stick on my work pc that only had 512mb at the time (sempron 2800) and it did nothing for the performance at all!! So stuck in another 1gb ddr module and that picked the performance up from the floor to half useable 

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# 99287 10-Dec-2007 17:26
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But was it on a USB 2.0 port? And did the system test it and started using as ReadyBoost? Not all USB memory devices can be used due to how they are manufactured.




 
 
 
 


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  # 99538 12-Dec-2007 01:15
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All readyboost did for me was decrease stability. More frequent bsod's.

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# 99555 12-Dec-2007 07:57
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Most BSOD are caused by drivers, or bad hardware. I'd suspect the USB driver or something else - for example memory problems.

But yes, ReadyBoost seems great for low end systems...




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  # 99556 12-Dec-2007 08:05
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freitasm:
But yes, ReadyBoost seems great for low end systems...


This is what many fail to understand Cry




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Chaks

Desktop : Intel Quad Core Q9400 2.66GHz - 8GB RAM - 500 GB + 500 GB HDD - NVidia GeForce 9800GT - LG246WH Flatron Display - Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise with Hyper-V
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Laptop: HP dv7-3004TX Entertainment Notebook PC | HP Touchsmart tx2 1119au - Windows 7 Ultimate x64
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  # 99632 12-Dec-2007 17:44
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chakkaradeep: ReadyBoost is mostly used and will be useful if you have Primary hard disk index is below 3.0. That helps increase in disk data transfer rate. Its not meant for all systems.All the recent hard disks will have an index > 3.0 nowadays, so getting a hard disk index below 3.0 would be some old hard drive.


My harddrive shows as a 4.8 on that scale (I assume it goes up to 5?). So Readyboost is unlikely to achieve much noticable gains.

Also my laptop had 1 GB RAM, and on that scale it was 3.9, but now that I have increased it to 1.5 GB it now rates at 4.5 on scale.

My laptop is not "slow", but I just thought that Readyboost may result in the hard drive doing less work as smaller often used files would be cached on the USB drive.

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# 99635 12-Dec-2007 17:48
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ReadyBoost is not a cache system. It's an intermediary area for your paging file, and a few other functions - but it won't cache files.

You should read this ReadyBoost FAQ for more information.






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  # 99638 12-Dec-2007 17:57
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freitasm: ReadyBoost is not a cache system. It's an intermediary area for your paging file, and a few other functions - but it won't cache files.

You should read this ReadyBoost FAQ for more information.


Yeah what I meant by that is this part from your link:

"Q: Isn't this just putting the paging file onto a flash disk?
A: Not really - the file is still backed on disk. This is a cache - if the data is not found in the ReadyBoost cache, we fall back to the HDD."

I know nothing about paging files, is there one paging file, or many paging files? Either way what I read said :

"Q: What perf do you need on your device?
A: 2.5MB/sec throughput for 4K random reads and 1.75MB/sec throughput for 512K random writes"

so I assumed that must mean paging file is many files, but as I said I wouldn't have a clue.

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  # 99641 12-Dec-2007 18:05
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When you first posted you wrote "smaller often used files would be cached on the USB drive". This is not the case. Paging files are a single large entity.

Reading from a paging file may not be sequential and the OS will request blocks as required to load applications and data back into memory when needed. Sometimes it can be data from random locations in memory stored in random locations on the paging file, and sometimes it could be a sequence.

Again, this is not caching files stored on your system, but caching data that is "overflowed" to a paging file. If you have plenty of memory you may not need this at all...







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  # 99642 12-Dec-2007 18:06
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Oh and because I read this off Wikipedia which I assumed would be right:

"Using ReadyBoost-capable flash memory for caching allows Windows Vista to service random disk reads with performance that is typically 80-100 times faster than random reads from traditional hard drives. This caching is applied to all disk content, not just the page file or system DLLs."

This also sounded handy:

"Additionally, on a laptop, the ReadyBoost caching can reduce hard drive access, allowing the hard drive to spin down for increased battery life "

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