Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


Banana?
4425 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1052

Subscriber

Topic # 90132 15-Sep-2011 14:55
Send private message

Hi All,

I have a client's 2003 Server, which is a Domain Controller. Their Hard drive crashed over the weekend and I have managed to restore it to another hard disk.

It appears that the only files damaged were the AD database (NTDS.dit).
This server is a member server (and currently the AD role has been handed off to another server so everyone can log on etc.)


Not of the NTDSUTIL tools work (they crash out straight away with Jet errors).


Can I just blow away the NTDS.dit file and replace it with the bog standard one that windows has in the System32 directory? Then once I get the server restarted in normal mode (will only start is Directory Services Restore Mode at the moment) rejoin the server to the domain and grab the AD from the other DC on the domain?          

Create new topic

gjm

747 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 91


  Reply # 521507 15-Sep-2011 15:12
Send private message

If it was me I would just blow away the old server and start again if it was an option. Seize all the FSMO roles on the working AD server and the rip out any references to the old server with ADSI edit. Then rebuild the old server and add the DC role to it again. Plenty of guides online on how to do this.

Alternatively do an NTBackup of the existing DC including system state and then do an non authoritive restore of AD on the broken server




[Amstrad CPC 6128: 128k Memory: 3 inch floppy drive: Colour Screen]



Banana?
4425 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1052

Subscriber

  Reply # 521515 15-Sep-2011 15:21
Send private message

gjm: If it was me I would just blow away the old server and start again if it was an option. Seize all the FSMO roles on the working AD server and the rip out any references to the old server with ADSI edit. Then rebuild the old server and add the DC role to it again. Plenty of guides online on how to do this.

Alternatively do an NTBackup of the existing DC including system state and then do an authoritive restore of AD on the broken server


Blowing the whole thing away would be easier, but they run some proprietary software off it and would rather not have to reinstall it.

I just need to know if I can blow away the existing AD database on it and restore that from the other DC(s)? And how do I blow away the AD database? Just replacing the NTDS.dit?   

gjm

747 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 91


  Reply # 521523 15-Sep-2011 15:33
Send private message

I believe that you need to do a proper restore, no just copy the file. Do you have the system state backup from before it died?

Note above that I forgot to put the non in front of authoritative restore. You dont want to do an authoritative as that will wipe the existing domain controller....bad.




[Amstrad CPC 6128: 128k Memory: 3 inch floppy drive: Colour Screen]



Banana?
4425 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1052

Subscriber

  Reply # 521938 16-Sep-2011 13:30
Send private message

Bah. Trying to do a windows repair, but the CD image they supplied me with is not the right version (won't do a repair, only a new install) therefore the key this copy of windows was installed with doesn't work.

Is there any way that I can just reset the AD database back to scratch from Safe Mode (which I can get into)? The directory service is all that is stopping it booting into normal mode.

Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.