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60 posts

Master Geek


Topic # 9353 10-Sep-2006 23:35
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Ok, heres the problem.

I have about 5 users who i want to be able to be able to access two wireless networks, one at the office, and one at home.

all of the networks currently have 10.x.x.x, although I can get the home networks changed to 192.168.x.x if it helps.

The problem is, for security reasons, i want to cut DHCP out of the equation.

So all I want to do, is have two static Ip's stored, and when the relevant Wireless Access point is detected, it automatically changes the IP address to the relevant network.

I can't find anything at all on how to do this !!!!!!!!!!!!!


Any ideas?

Anyone have a similar problem?

Cheers





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BDFL - Memuneh
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Reply # 45792 11-Sep-2006 08:07
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There are a few products in the market to do this. You have to search for "Network Profile Manager" or similar terms.

Other than using a third party software you will have to use the same IP everywhere (which is not easy if people want to access other networks, while travelling for example) or accept that DHCP is not that bad and exists for a reason.





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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 45801 11-Sep-2006 10:18
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As Mauricio said, DHCP is there for a reason. It does make life alot simpler when moving between multiple locations.

The other options (if the access point supports it) is to mac lock, and manually assign ip's based on mac address. If it supports manually assigning then you can essentially have an ip that's always the same (static) but is assigned via DHCP when you connect.

It's a feature I use a bit with dhcpd on linux, but off the top of my head I dont' know if any of the access points have a similar options.

Alternatively yes a network profile switcher would do the job for a static static ip. The Toshiba laptops (with built in wifi) normally ship with a program called ConfigFree which has that type of functionality.

Jp.




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Authorised Service Agent for Apple, BenQ, Navman, Sony, and Toshiba - warranty & non-warranty repairs.



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Master Geek


  Reply # 45804 11-Sep-2006 10:35
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The problem is, the office network doesn't have DHCP, hence my wanting to cut it out. The reason for this is that we limit people that connect wirelessly to a very small subnet, and there is no DHCP controller for that subnet

Also, not all of the home networks have DHCP (so i'm told, but i don't actually belive this :) ).

I'll look into those tools you mentioned

CHeers,


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Reply # 45805 11-Sep-2006 10:39
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You will find that all home networks have DHCP. Very few people disable this feature, otherwise people would have to fumble with configurations they don't understand.





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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 45806 11-Sep-2006 10:52
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I'm a bit surprised at having no dhcp in an office environment aswell. It used to be semi-common not to have it for smaller networks but any properly set up network will normally have it for the pure plug & play type convenience it gives.

Another option to look into might be to add dhcp to your office network. You can configure smaller subnet ranges in the dhcp configuration and also depending on what dhcp server you use configure it with mac restrictions.

Given the choice I'd go with adding a dhcp server to the office. It makes life alot simpler for future usage. It also means you can still have dhcp enabled for wherever you may happen to plug the laptop in (home, work, friends place, etc).

Jp.




Working for Service Plus - www.serviceplus.co.nz

Authorised Service Agent for Apple, BenQ, Navman, Sony, and Toshiba - warranty & non-warranty repairs.



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Master Geek


  Reply # 45808 11-Sep-2006 10:59
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I'll have to look into that. The small network at the office i am talking about does have wired connections as well, so i'll look into whether i can set up DHCP with MAC address security, for wired devices.

Basically i'm already overbudget, so trying not to buy new hardware etc,

Cheers,



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