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2483 posts

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  # 109438 9-Feb-2008 10:50
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You don't need to erase the drive and make it FAT32, if you really want NTFS read/write support, go into Synaptic and search "NTFS". (It's been a while since I last used Ubuntu - forgot the package name).

Even if it makes you cry, there will be one day when you have to touch something. Laughing It's basically how Linux operates.




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  # 109441 9-Feb-2008 11:11
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Fortunately I was raised in the DOS 6/Win 3 days, so I realise that Windows Vista is just a kind of facade for CLI.

Having said that this is about the extent of my knowledge:

dir
del *.*
cd
ping
ipconfig /all
/?

 
 
 
 


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  # 109444 9-Feb-2008 11:19
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Ah.. good old /? for all those programs... help when you need it.
I used to use Win 3.11 for Workgroups. Wouldn't recommend to use del *.* everywhere. Laughing




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  # 109451 9-Feb-2008 11:51
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Ok I checked out Edubuntu, but couldn't understand the differences between that and Ubuntu (except that Edubuntu is designed to be useful to those setting up computers in an educational environment such as a school lab). What should determine which *I* use?

Another thing is that I note that the minimum specs for Edubuntu might be higher - 1Ghz processor and 256Mb RAM vs. no mention on processor speed and 256Mb RAM. Not sure if I would get away with 400Mhz and 384Mb RAM. I presume running the Live CD would give me some idea?

Is the reason for the different specs that they run different desktop environments? And if so, do you know if things can be down-scaled to run on lower-end machines?

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  # 109453 9-Feb-2008 11:55
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No, the Live CD doesn't determine how fast it goes as foobar explained earlier.

For the min specs, it can run, but it could be slower. The PIII that I had ran at 667MHz and had 256MB RAM and it was smooth. So 400MHz shouldn't be too off.

Xubuntu should run faster, but it's a different desktop environment.




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  # 109455 9-Feb-2008 12:01
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Yes I realise the Live CD will run slower than it would installed, but would it give me *some* idea of the speed?

I'm confused - Edubuntu uses "Gnome" which I presume is processor demanding, however it comes with KDE Edutainment software which is one of its main features. However that runs on "KDE" - right?

So does that mean *any* version of Linux can run the KDE Edutainment software (ie. to get those benefits could I just install Ubuntu which is less processor demanding and install KDE Edutainment? I really can't get my head around these terms.

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  # 109459 9-Feb-2008 12:09
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The speed can be affected by the CD read speed itself, which will not give you nearly next to nothing in terms of an idea of the actual speed.

Although Edubuntu may have Gnome as it's preferred base, KDE components can be installed (kde-base I think it is, and some others if required) and will also allow to install most KDE apps. Kubuntu is Ubuntu but with KDE (but it also has less apps, but that could be a good thing)

KDE and Gnome are the most easiest to use but are also more processor-demanding than say Xfce.




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  # 109461 9-Feb-2008 12:13
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Yes I realise the Live CD will run slower than it would installed, but would it give me *some* idea of the speed?


Difficult to say. For operations that are just taking place in memory, the Live CD should give you an indication. But often, for the opening of menus within an app or starting of a new applications, data needs to be loaded and that is often much slower from the CD.

I'm confused - Edubuntu uses "Gnome" which I presume is processor demanding, however it comes with KDE Edutainment software which is one of its main features. However that runs on "KDE" - right?


You can run KDE applications under Gnome and vice versa. The application may be slightly better integrated into the 'right' desktop, but it will run nevertheless. As long as you don't let yourself be startled about menu structures and layout that is different between the two desktop worlds, there shouldn't be a problem at all.

So does that mean *any* version of Linux can run the KDE Edutainment software (ie. to get those benefits could I just install Ubuntu which is less processor demanding and install KDE Edutainment? I really can't get my head around these terms.


Don't know about Xubuntu, but normally what happens is: If you run Ubuntu (with Gnome desktop) and then install a KDE application, the installer will detect that some KDE libraries are missing and will automatically load and install them. This takes place completely automatically.

I doubt that other version of Ubuntu are more or less processor demanding than Edubuntu. I think the only reason they listed a higher spec for Edubuntu might be that some of the apps they include in the educational suite may benefit from more CPU cycles. But not knowing which ones, I would just give it a try.

Nevertheless, I thought that one of the main benefits of Edubuntu was the ability to administer a classroom or school full of PCs easily. If that is not a requirement for you, you should be just fine with the standard version of Ubuntu, setting up a user account with limited rights for your child...



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  # 109465 9-Feb-2008 12:24
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I have been looking at the KDE Edu site and cannot find a way to download and install the Edutainment package on Linux :/ It's bundled with Edubuntu on the iso so would make it easy, but if Ubuntu was a better choice otherwise then I'd like to be able to install the other package.

In Linux, is it not the same as in Windows where I download a file and install it? Everything refers to the Synaptic manager.

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  # 109467 9-Feb-2008 12:32
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... everything refers to a package manager as that's how you install software. You can download files (.deb for Ubuntu and Debian-derived systems) and install, but they still relate to the package manager somehow.

After a quick search into the ubuntu repositories, here is the kdeedu package.

You don't need to worry about all the extra mumbo-jumbo, you install Ubuntu, run Synaptic, enable the Universe repository, search for 'kdeedu', select and install! Everything else is done for you.

You can also run the following in Terminal:
sudo apt-get install kdeedu




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  # 109472 9-Feb-2008 13:11
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I like to keep installation files on my computer in case I need to reinstall at a later stage. Is that not possible with this package? Would I have to download every single component individually?

I'm leaning towards Edubuntu for ease of not having to constantly use my 256 internet connection to install additional stuff having downloading 700Mb already.

However the Edubuntu site is being redeveloped and you can't even download it??

Also, what are the pros and cons of changing my 2nd hdd from NTFS to FAT32 if I'm going to only run Linux on the computer?

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  # 109474 9-Feb-2008 13:20
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I like to keep installation files on my computer in case I need to reinstall at a later stage. Is that not possible with this package? Would I have to download every single component individually?


As mentioned earlier: A re-installation of the OS will very rarely be necessary. The package files themselves are cached in case you just want to re-install that one particular package. But even if you upgrade to the latest version of Ubuntu, you apps are upgraded right with it (if a new version exists) or left as they are. Either way, the same thing doesn't have to be downloaded again.



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  # 109477 9-Feb-2008 13:28
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Sorry guys. I guess you must do a lot of headbanging in the process of "re-educating" Windows users. Laughing



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  # 109550 9-Feb-2008 21:52
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Ok I have downloaded Edubuntu and would like to give this a go. I have some final questions before I take the plunge.

My setup is:
c: 10Gb "System" HDD (NTFS)
d: 20Gb "Documents" HDD (NTFS)

I intend on moving any files c: that I require onto d:

Then I would expect to format c: and install Edubuntu.

1. Will the Install CD help me to format c: completely for installing Edubuntu? Is it FAT32 that Linux uses?

2. Do I need to worry about partitioning c:?

3. Will the install do ANYTHING to d: - ie. are my files on d: "completely" safe or is there some risk that I could lose data from that?

4. Should I leave d: alone in NTFS format or is there any reason that I should reformat it to FAT32/other for use under Linux?

5. What about antivirus and firewall software - is there software you recommend that I download now while I have a certain internet connection for installation on top of the OS?

6. Any warnings or other general advice for me before I "format c:"?  

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  # 109552 9-Feb-2008 22:04
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  1. Most Linux distros help you wipe out a disc drive during setup. Ubuntu(etc...) makes it even easier to wipe out a complete drive (too easy in my view - nearly wiped out my drive without me knowing)

    You actually don't need to COMPLETELY wipe your drive - you can split it (known as paritioning). You can use up the blank space and create a section (or a partition) to run Ubuntu(etc...) on.

    Most Linux distros use ext3. If you want to access the files on your Linux from Windows, visit here: http://gentoo-wiki.com/Ext3_in_windows
  2. As above
  3. "D:" or the second hard drive will be untouched (unless you actually do something to it).

    You will also need to learn how drives are 'mounted'. But that can come later as Ubuntu has made a easier graphical way to view files in the Explorer-like interface, unless you're using Terminal.
  4. You don't have to change it. NTFS is fine for normal reading (without any extras), but write access is only a few clicks away.
  5. Antivirus - not much. Firewall? Well, Ubuntu does come with a firewall, but it's not configured. If you want an easy configurer, use Lokkit. Install the package: "gnome-lokkit" in Synaptic / apt-get.

    EDIT: Firestarter seems to be a good one too. Enable the "universe" repository and install.
  6. Nothing other than to backup.




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