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Yutani
28 posts

Geek


  #2191461 5-Mar-2019 18:00
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Desktops : Kubuntu 18.10  (Installed with 'minimal' option), Project Trident (BSD) - Excellent.

 

Servers : Ubuntu, FreeBSD, FreeNAS - Excellent.

 

 

 

YMMV

 

Cheers!


 
 
 

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amiga500
1484 posts

Uber Geek
Inactive user


  #2193168 7-Mar-2019 17:11
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This is not worth a new thread but the Linux people who say once a piece a hardware is in the kernel it will bring happiness and content forever are not really right.  Regressions can and do rear their ugly heads just as in the software.   Here is an example the  NEC UPD720202  chipset, which controls some pcie usb 3 addon cards.   A few years ago this chipset worked really well but starting with Ubuntu 16.04 and later the forums are full of posts about this chipset being a real problem.  Some people got the cards to work by using modified kernels but it's far from easy.

 

As one of my two usb 3 ports showed some signs of being worn I thought to upgrade with one of these cards.  Very glad I didn't rush out and buy one.  Needless to say people have no problem getting these to work in Windows as they are fully supported with drivers.  Luckily for me I have plenty of other usb ports that are working fine.

 

To my mind this is a classic example of very mainstream hardware being very well supported in Linux, but the more unusual the hardware is, the more chance of problems being encountered.   

 

 

 

 


openmedia
3071 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #2193192 7-Mar-2019 18:58
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amiga500:

 

This is not worth a new thread but the Linux people who say once a piece a hardware is in the kernel it will bring happiness and content forever are not really right.  Regressions can and do rear their ugly heads just as in the software.   Here is an example the  NEC UPD720202  chipset, which controls some pcie usb 3 addon cards.   A few years ago this chipset worked really well but starting with Ubuntu 16.04 and later the forums are full of posts about this chipset being a real problem.  Some people got the cards to work by using modified kernels but it's far from easy.

 

As one of my two usb 3 ports showed some signs of being worn I thought to upgrade with one of these cards.  Very glad I didn't rush out and buy one.  Needless to say people have no problem getting these to work in Windows as they are fully supported with drivers.  Luckily for me I have plenty of other usb ports that are working fine.

 

To my mind this is a classic example of very mainstream hardware being very well supported in Linux, but the more unusual the hardware is, the more chance of problems being encountered.   

 

 

 

 

Yes sadly regressions occur. I've seen many in my 20+ years with Linux.

 

Regressions can also occur with other OS platforms as well.





Generally known online as OpenMedia, now working for Red Hat APAC as a Technology Evangelist and Portfolio Architect. Still playing with MythTV and digital media on the side.




Yutani
28 posts

Geek


  #2193197 7-Mar-2019 19:33
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amiga500:

This is not worth a new thread but the Linux people who say once a piece a hardware is in the kernel it will bring happiness and content forever are not really right.  Regressions can and do rear their ugly heads just as in the software.   Here is an example the  NEC UPD720202  chipset, which controls some pcie usb 3 addon cards.   A few years ago this chipset worked really well but starting with Ubuntu 16.04 and later the forums are full of posts about this chipset being a real problem.  Some people got the cards to work by using modified kernels but it's far from easy.


As one of my two usb 3 ports showed some signs of being worn I thought to upgrade with one of these cards.  Very glad I didn't rush out and buy one.  Needless to say people have no problem getting these to work in Windows as they are fully supported with drivers.  Luckily for me I have plenty of other usb ports that are working fine.


To my mind this is a classic example of very mainstream hardware being very well supported in Linux, but the more unusual the hardware is, the more chance of problems being encountered.   


 


 


Regressions are generic to all software in all Operating Systems.These days out of the box device support is a better experience on Linux than Windows for example. Edge cases exist.

Tracer
343 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2193278 7-Mar-2019 22:12
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Just got FreeSync working with Linux 5.0.0, xf86-video-amdgpu 19.0.0, and mesa 19.0.0-rc7. That's taken a lot longer than I hoped!


farcus
1467 posts

Uber Geek


  #2193303 8-Mar-2019 00:27
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amiga500:

 

This is not worth a new thread but the Linux people who say once a piece a hardware is in the kernel it will bring happiness and content forever are not really right.  Regressions can and do rear their ugly heads just as in the software.   Here is an example the  NEC UPD720202  chipset, which controls some pcie usb 3 addon cards.   A few years ago this chipset worked really well but starting with Ubuntu 16.04 and later the forums are full of posts about this chipset being a real problem.  Some people got the cards to work by using modified kernels but it's far from easy.

 

As one of my two usb 3 ports showed some signs of being worn I thought to upgrade with one of these cards.  Very glad I didn't rush out and buy one.  Needless to say people have no problem getting these to work in Windows as they are fully supported with drivers.  Luckily for me I have plenty of other usb ports that are working fine.

 

To my mind this is a classic example of very mainstream hardware being very well supported in Linux, but the more unusual the hardware is, the more chance of problems being encountered.  

 

 

 

 

surely the problem here is more of a lack of support from NEC for their drivers in Linux.
Better to choose hardware that is well supported by the manufacturer. 
I always search for Linux compatibility / manufacturer support before making any hardware purchase.


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