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Topic # 153574 1-Oct-2014 18:42
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Hi there,

So this week me and a close friend were accused of plagiarising work from each other for a recent assignment. We didn't, and most of the faculty don't believe us because the design/layout of diagrams are too similar apparently.

So we need to prove somehow that the documents were made at certain computers at certain times etc. because I'd be able to cross reference those times with other things like bank statements/phone logs/foursquare checkins proving I was no where near my friend at the time/asleep etc.

I've tried the 'Get Info' option on my mac but it doesn't show much for a word document other than when it was made and last edited. I'm trying to find if theres a way that shows exactly what PC it was made on, using what software and stuff like that. 

Would also like to do the same for Windows as I made some Visio diagrams on there that have also been called into question. 

It's probably a long shot that this will help but at this point its our word against the uni's so anything I can get to help plead my case would be of help tbh. 


Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Cheers in advance.




Bachelor of Computing Systems (2015)

 

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Sam, Auckland 


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  Reply # 1145044 1-Oct-2014 18:46
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Proving you were nowhere near isn't gonna help, your friend could've emailed/text/pastebin'd the info to you (I don't know or care either way tbh :P). Anyway, that aside, you can just right click the file and go Properties on a Windows box, and the Details tab will show you most of the relevant metainfo about the file.




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  Reply # 1145046 1-Oct-2014 18:49
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File -> Properties in Word on a Mac will give you some more detail, but as above, it probably isn't going to prove what you want



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  Reply # 1145213 1-Oct-2014 23:08
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Yeh tried those things but not really much help. I think I'm pulling at any strings I can find to prove our point. 

Will keep hunting but was thinking there was some magic software that would tell me everything there is to know about a file lol

Thanks guys




Bachelor of Computing Systems (2015)

 

--

 

Late 2013 MacBook Pro with Retina Display (4GB/2.4GHz i5/128GB SSD) - HP DV6 (8GB/2.8GHz i7/120GB SSD + 750GB HDD)
iPhone 6S + (64GB/Gold/Vodafone NZ) - Xperia Z C6603 (16GB/White/Spark NZ)

Sam, Auckland 


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  Reply # 1145855 2-Oct-2014 18:16
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Is it just the diagram or are there other similarities? So they are reducing your mark, zeroing your mark or requiring you to resubmit?

Do you both have any working notes which show that you each arrived at and developed the diagram independently?

Something similar happened to me long ago. I still get annoyed if by chance I think about it. ; (.

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  Reply # 1145862 2-Oct-2014 18:29
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Do you have time machine running on the mac?

Could show the history of changes that you made.




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  Reply # 1145878 2-Oct-2014 18:55
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In Word look at:

File > Info > Versions

Maybe the same feature is in Visio?

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