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3212 posts

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  # 677095 26-Aug-2012 12:52
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Technofreak: Two points worth making.

To me it makes sense to have the good tyres on the front. That's where the steering and braking happen and where the most likely source of any instability problem's start.  I would suggest that most accidents occur through loss of control at the front (under steer, lack of traction for braking, aquaplaning) before loss of control occurs with the rear tyres.

Sure good traction at the front compared to the rear can cause loss of traction at the rear but I rather suspect this happens less frequently that loss of traction on the front tyres.






Having spent a fair chunk of my past lifetime attending and investigating vehicle crashes, I can assure that almost without exception "loss of control" crashes on bends (or even occasionally on straight roads) occur through the rear end losing traction.

The fact is the regular joe-bloggs driver, and even most of those who think they are hot-stuff behind the wheel, can't handle a sudden loss of traction at the rear.  There is also inevitably insufficient space to correct this before hitting something.

I see this decision as subjective, and each to their own, but my money is ALWAYS on good tires on the back.  






Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



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  # 677101 26-Aug-2012 13:11
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Hobchild: I wish this thread went up a couple of months ago. Beaurepaires didn't mention a thing to me about this although to be fair I didn't ask either. But it would have been nice if they had mentioned something. Well I guess I better go and rotate my tyres.


Tyre manufacturers (Goodyear, Bridgestone/Firestone, Dunlop, Michelin) always recommend new tyres must be at the rear axle. This is true for all type of cars - FWD, RWD, 4WD

FACT: If the pair of tires which begin to hydroplane first is on the front of the vehicle, it is far easier to regain control of the vehicle. First, the driver will feel the skid in the steering when the skid begins. Second, the intuitive action of taking your foot off the accelerator and steering into the direction of the skid will prevent loss of control. When it is the back tires which begin to skid, it is much more difficult to control. The loss of control is much harder to detect because it isn’t felt in the steering wheel and the actions to control are counterintuitive (turning away from the direction of the skid).

source: AJforeignauto





 
 
 
 


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  # 677106 26-Aug-2012 13:26
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Tyre company paid out $8.5million to a driver involved in accident because two new tires mounted on the front axle 3 months earlier.

Source: Feldman Shepherd







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  # 677110 26-Aug-2012 13:46
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Thanks a lot for your suggestions folks.

Here is an update:

1. Firstly,I got WOF done and it failed on the front 2 Bridgestones. Rear Yokohomas passed with a TD of ~5+mm.

2. Went to Tony's service in AKL, they said unless you force us otherwise we would recommend putting 2 new at the rear excel.

3. Moved Yokohomas with 5+ mm TD to the front and got new Firestone TZ700s for the rear.

4. Wheel balancing, alignment and Nitrogen inflation done on complete set.

Cheers

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  # 677116 26-Aug-2012 14:07
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ankit816: Thanks a lot for your suggestions folks.

Here is an update:

1. Firstly,I got WOF done and it failed on the front 2 Bridgestones. Rear Yokohomas passed with a TD of ~5+mm.

2. Went to Tony's service in AKL, they said unless you force us otherwise we would recommend putting 2 new at the rear excel.

3. Moved Yokohomas with 5+ mm TD to the front and got new Firestone TZ700s for the rear.

4. Wheel balancing, alignment and Nitrogen inflation done on complete set.

Cheers


Good to know that Tony's tyre gave good/correct advice.

Drive safe!





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  # 677779 27-Aug-2012 19:46
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clevedon:
Technofreak: First it's pretty easy to tell if your tyres will pass the warrant.  There's a wear marker/indicator running across the tyre at regular intervals around the tyre.  When the tread depth matches the depth of the wear marker/indicator then your tyres are no longer legal.


Incorrect, they are not legal depths, they are a guideline that they need replacing soon - not a legal depth limit.


Quote -What is the new requirement for tyre tread depth?The rule now states that a tyre must have a tread pattern depth of at least 1.5mm (excluding any tie-bar or tread depth indicator strip) within all principal grooves that contain moulded tread depth indicators and around the whole circumference of the tyre.

Virtually all tyres have moulded tread-depth indicators. However, a small number of tyres, such as some retreaded or vintage tyres, may not have moulded tread-depth indicators. For these, the NZTA has retained the old requirement of at least 1.5mm tread depth across ¾ of the tread width and around the whole circumference of the tyre.

https://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt.nz/virms/in-service-wof/technical-bulletins/guidance-for-vehicle-inspectors-when-checking-tyre-tread-depth




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  # 677786 27-Aug-2012 20:06
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I am still suprised that there is no grip requirement for tires. The 2 used ones I got forever ago for not much from a used tire place when I needed a warrant are still way up in the amount of tread they have but have useless grip since they are old and hard.

Will find out when I go for a warrant next, I fully expect them to not have any traction on the brake testing machine or something.




Richard rich.ms

 
 
 
 


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  # 677912 28-Aug-2012 06:10
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Lurch:
clevedon:
Technofreak: First it's pretty easy to tell if your tyres will pass the warrant.  There's a wear marker/indicator running across the tyre at regular intervals around the tyre.  When the tread depth matches the depth of the wear marker/indicator then your tyres are no longer legal.


Incorrect, they are not legal depths, they are a guideline that they need replacing soon - not a legal depth limit.


Quote -What is the new requirement for tyre tread depth?The rule now states that a tyre must have a tread pattern depth of at least 1.5mm (excluding any tie-bar or tread depth indicator strip) within all principal grooves that contain moulded tread depth indicators and around the whole circumference of the tyre.

Virtually all tyres have moulded tread-depth indicators. However, a small number of tyres, such as some retreaded or vintage tyres, may not have moulded tread-depth indicators. For these, the NZTA has retained the old requirement of at least 1.5mm tread depth across ¾ of the tread width and around the whole circumference of the tyre.

https://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt.nz/virms/in-service-wof/technical-bulletins/guidance-for-vehicle-inspectors-when-checking-tyre-tread-depth


The the depth of the tread is measured in the groove where the TDI is located but the TDI itself is not 1.5mm in height from the base of the tread - where they are located is where you measure the depth of the tread. So no, the TDI is not the legal depth.

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