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  Reply # 785858 23-Mar-2013 12:48
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richms: refillable glass will never work now there is no home delivery to take emptys away. Trucking emptys back is a logistics nightmare and waste of fuel.
Recycling glass is prettymuch needless since its just sand. Can be downcycled to roading etc but its heavy to transport.


It never ceases to amaze me how something as simple as refillable glass will never work... Well - it did work when I was a kid, and from what I recall, it worked reasonably well. So thirty years on - suddenly its impossible... Progress???

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  Reply # 785987 23-Mar-2013 18:06
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Everyone in the house working longer hours so noone is home to collect it when it arrives. Greater number of little punks on the street that will steal it, pee on it/whatever, vastly greater selection of milk products available.

If you are expecting retailers to take the bottles back for a customer walking in, there is the added space needed to keep them, the smell of empty milk bottles.

Freight logistics for getting emptys back to the plant where they are bottled, as the contracted drivers are not going to collect them for free. Since they are glass they dont compact like scrap plastic bottles do.

There are also many competing brands of milk now, which was not the case 30 years ago when milk was delivered to the letterbox in glass.

A high end delivery company may make it work as part of one of the other food delivery services that are springing up now, but the old milkman in the truck is a best forgotten memory of a long time ago.




Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 786505 25-Mar-2013 09:16
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Linuxluver:
mattwnz:
Linuxluver: 

It's a disgrace that NZ didn't mandate returnable containers with a deposit 50 years ago...and the disgrace is repeated every day since. 




I think we will find that something like that may happen in the future, as we have to adopt more environmentally friendly practices. If fonterra really wanted a break though container of note for their own brand, they could have invented something  out of recyclable ceramic. Glass is the most healthy way to store milk too, as there is no risk of anything leaching out  into the milk. My local council has recently stopped providing recycling as part of the rates, so some councils are going backwards . Manufacturers should be required to collect and recycle all of their packaging.


We used to have milk in glass bottles for 2 cents / 600mls. 

Then the supermarkets got into the act...and killed it off. They use plastic (imported, last I heard) containers and where they end up is anyone's guess. Most likely landfills...

Where I grew up (Ontario, Canada) - 50 years ago - there was a 2c deposit on small glass soft drink bottles and a 5c deposit on the big ones. It was possible to make 10 or 20 cents on the way to school in the morning as hoons and loons will always throw their stuff away even if it's worth money.  In those days a chocolate bar was 10c.....so 20c was serious cash in the hands of an 8yo. 

Deposits on bottles made kids moving to and from school a defacto wave of hundreds of cleaners in any neighbourhood.

I guess you had to do something to keep your mind off the walk to school, since you were barefoot and it was uphill in both directions?

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  Reply # 792966 4-Apr-2013 10:05
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DaveDog: It's a marketing rort. Nothing more...


You couldn't be more wrong. We double blind tested the 6 people including 2 kids in our family and every single one got the new milk and described it as more creamy and tasting better.

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  Reply # 792969 4-Apr-2013 10:08
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networkn:
DaveDog: It's a marketing rort. Nothing more...


You couldn't be more wrong. We double blind tested the 6 people including 2 kids in our family and every single one got the new milk and described it as more creamy and tasting better.


So surely it would taste the same as milk in cartons... They're not see through either...

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  Reply # 792970 4-Apr-2013 10:11
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DaveDog:
networkn:
DaveDog: It's a marketing rort. Nothing more...


You couldn't be more wrong. We double blind tested the 6 people including 2 kids in our family and every single one got the new milk and described it as more creamy and tasting better.


So surely it would taste the same as milk in cartons... They're not see through either...


Not sure how you expect me to answer that, we weren't sent cartons and they don't make them in 2 and 3 litre sizes so it's not really useful to us.

Banana?
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  Reply # 793000 4-Apr-2013 10:49
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networkn:
DaveDog:
networkn:
DaveDog: It's a marketing rort. Nothing more...


You couldn't be more wrong. We double blind tested the 6 people including 2 kids in our family and every single one got the new milk and described it as more creamy and tasting better.


So surely it would taste the same as milk in cartons... They're not see through either...


Not sure how you expect me to answer that, we weren't sent cartons and they don't make them in 2 and 3 litre sizes so it's not really useful to us.

And, the cartons let light in (according to Fonterra, I've never been inside a carton).
And, the cartons are less environmentally friendly than the plastic bottles (last I heard, and it was a while ago, tetra-pak cartons could not be recycled in NZ).

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  Reply # 793001 4-Apr-2013 10:51
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trig42:
networkn:
DaveDog:
networkn:
DaveDog: It's a marketing rort. Nothing more...


You couldn't be more wrong. We double blind tested the 6 people including 2 kids in our family and every single one got the new milk and described it as more creamy and tasting better.


So surely it would taste the same as milk in cartons... They're not see through either...


Not sure how you expect me to answer that, we weren't sent cartons and they don't make them in 2 and 3 litre sizes so it's not really useful to us.

And, the cartons let light in (according to Fonterra, I've never been inside a carton).
And, the cartons are less environmentally friendly than the plastic bottles (last I heard, and it was a while ago, tetra-pak cartons could not be recycled in NZ).


Yes I was going to say something about the fact I felt cartons were able to send light through but I wasn't 100% sure.

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Reply # 793068 4-Apr-2013 12:03
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I have to laugh every time I see the Anchor adds for the new bottles - they are now so concerned about the quality of milk and its degradation due to light that they're bringing out the new bottles (after all - cow's aren't see thru are they!?)...

Why has it taken this long for it to become a concern!???  I think this is proof alone that this is just a big marketing push! (Yes it may well be better for the milk, but for decades it hasn't been an issue for them - but it is now!) Tongue Out

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  Reply # 793104 4-Apr-2013 12:30
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DaveDog: 
It never ceases to amaze me how something as simple as refillable glass will never work... Well - it did work when I was a kid, and from what I recall, it worked reasonably well. So thirty years on - suddenly its impossible... Progress???


Milk was a regulated industry back then, you could not buy it at supermarket until 1986, and until 1993 the price in supermarkets was controlled so as to not undercut the home delivery industry,

If you want to go back to refillable home delivery you will have to re-regulate supermarkets out of the milk business and that simply ain't gonna happen.

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Reply # 793255 4-Apr-2013 14:52
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networkn:
DaveDog: It's a marketing rort. Nothing more...


You couldn't be more wrong. We double blind tested the 6 people including 2 kids in our family and every single one got the new milk and described it as more creamy and tasting better.

Sounds rigorously scientific!

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  Reply # 793376 4-Apr-2013 17:58
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mattwnz:
c3rn:
mattwnz: It's the same mil. 

You would think they would have a window slot down the side of the bottle.


Guess it would defeat the point of have a bottle that doesn't allow light in?




No, not if it is a removable adhesive strip to cover it. My copyrighted idea I previously posted. Once you have it home and in the fridge it doesn't matter that it has a clear strip. 


What about a clear strip just at the lower 2 or 5 cm of the bottle. Would stop most light. If you can't see the level there's plenty left. If you can see the level, time to buy more.

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  Reply # 793383 4-Apr-2013 18:27
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I would have thought the main reason behind this is to drive up milk consumption. when you can see there is only a little bit left in the bottle you tend to drink less.

Not anymore :)

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  Reply # 793601 4-Apr-2013 23:00
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Are the new bottles still fully recyclable? I have heard that milk and clear soft drink bottles are most valuable to recycling companies since no coloured dyes or resins have been added.





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  Reply # 793673 5-Apr-2013 08:31
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If anyone is keen on seeing how the bottles are made, Breakfast on TV ONE will be running a news article on the plant where the bottles are made on Monday morning from 7am.

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