Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
3316 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #789344 29-Mar-2013 18:50
Send private message

Geektastic:
bazzer: So what excuse will you use if it ever happened to you? I guess you needn't worry, it's just one of those unlucky things that happens. What do they call it, an accident, I think?


It simply won't happen to me.

I never drink ANY alcohol if I know I am driving.

I know, you said that. I meant, what will you blame when you can't blame the one beer you didn't have? And will you feel better or worse about yourself knowing you only have yourself to blame?

My point was accidents happen. If you had one beer, I don't really believe that would be the cause of the accident (given how quickly it's likely metabolised. I'm all for a zero tolerance, it sends the proper message, i.e. don't drink and drive, but how long do you have to wait after having a beer before you can drive again? 1 hours? 4 hours? 24 hours?

Edit: Oops! Looks like I missed a whole page of similar discussion!

4694 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #789345 29-Mar-2013 18:50
Send private message

networkn: 1) Get a Taxi home (or any of the other services that get you and your car home).
2) Designate a Sober driver.

In case you consider using cost as a factor, if you can afford to drink, you can afford a taxi. If you can't afford both, don't do either!


Actually I very rarely drive short distances as I don't consider private cars to be cost effective for this purpose generally, so I would normally be taking a bus home anyway.

However, my point still stands. If, for some particular reason, I need to use the car to get home and there is absolutely no shadow of doubt that I am within a safe limit then I will drive. If I'm going to have a raucous night on the piss then obviously the car keys won't be in my pocket.

I'm not trying to be macho here and make out that accidents always happen to someone else. The road safety guidelines that I follow are consistent with how I expect everyone else to behave on the road.

 
 
 
 




22934 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #789362 29-Mar-2013 19:42
Send private message

bazzer:
Geektastic:
bazzer: So what excuse will you use if it ever happened to you? I guess you needn't worry, it's just one of those unlucky things that happens. What do they call it, an accident, I think?


It simply won't happen to me.

I never drink ANY alcohol if I know I am driving.

I know, you said that. I meant, what will you blame when you can't blame the one beer you didn't have? And will you feel better or worse about yourself knowing you only have yourself to blame?



LOL so let me get this straight. Your argument for allowing people to drink and drive is so they can blame the alcohol instead of themselves if they are in an accident? Wow. 



22934 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #789363 29-Mar-2013 19:44
Send private message

alasta:
networkn: 1) Get a Taxi home (or any of the other services that get you and your car home).
2) Designate a Sober driver.

In case you consider using cost as a factor, if you can afford to drink, you can afford a taxi. If you can't afford both, don't do either!


Actually I very rarely drive short distances as I don't consider private cars to be cost effective for this purpose generally, so I would normally be taking a bus home anyway.

However, my point still stands. If, for some particular reason, I need to use the car to get home and there is absolutely no shadow of doubt that I am within a safe limit then I will drive. If I'm going to have a raucous night on the piss then obviously the car keys won't be in my pocket.

I'm not trying to be macho here and make out that accidents always happen to someone else. The road safety guidelines that I follow are consistent with how I expect everyone else to behave on the road.


If you drink, it's impossible for their to be no doubt. You could be sick (and not know it), or any of 10 other factors that might affect how the alcohol you consumed might have changed your expected input.

I'm still asking for you to give me a good reason why driving after drinking is something you require to be able to do?

4694 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #789367 29-Mar-2013 19:53
Send private message

networkn: If you drink, it's impossible for their to be no doubt. You could be sick (and not know it), or any of 10 other factors that might affect how the alcohol you consumed might have changed your expected input.


I disagree.

I'm still asking for you to give me a good reason why driving after drinking is something you require to be able to do?


There isn't one. There are thousands of enjoyable things in life that you don't 'need' to be able to do. If you only ever do the absolutely necessary then you must lead a very dull life.

3316 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #789369 29-Mar-2013 19:53
Send private message

networkn: LOL so let me get this straight. Your argument for allowing people to drink and drive is so they can blame the alcohol instead of themselves if they are in an accident? Wow. 

Huh? Not at all, and I don't know where you got that idea from.

Nice selective quoting BTW.



22934 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #789433 29-Mar-2013 21:34
Send private message

alasta:
networkn: If you drink, it's impossible for their to be no doubt. You could be sick (and not know it), or any of 10 other factors that might affect how the alcohol you consumed might have changed your expected input.


I disagree.

I'm still asking for you to give me a good reason why driving after drinking is something you require to be able to do?


There isn't one. There are thousands of enjoyable things in life that you don't 'need' to be able to do. If you only ever do the absolutely necessary then you must lead a very dull life.


Right, agreed, but is drinking AND driving required to have said fun? 

I'd certainly like to understand on what grounds you could disagree that it's not possible to be 100% certain you are not affected by the alcohol you drink in your driving?

 
 
 
 




22934 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #789437 29-Mar-2013 21:38
Send private message

bazzer:
networkn: LOL so let me get this straight. Your argument for allowing people to drink and drive is so they can blame the alcohol instead of themselves if they are in an accident? Wow. 

Huh? Not at all, and I don't know where you got that idea from.

Nice selective quoting BTW.


Not selective, I quoted your entire statement. I'd certainly like clarification on what you meant if it wasn't what I thought it meant.

4694 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #789439 29-Mar-2013 21:43
Send private message

networkn: Right, agreed, but is drinking AND driving required to have said fun?


I addressed this above. I don't use a car to make short trips, but in principle I see no problem with driving a vehicle with well under 50mg of alcohol.

I'd certainly like to understand on what grounds you could disagree that it's not possible to be 100% certain you are not affected by the alcohol you drink in your driving?


Because the volume consumed is too small to make a difference to driver performance.



22934 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #789441 29-Mar-2013 21:55
Send private message


I addressed this above. I don't use a car to make short trips, but in principle I see no problem with driving a vehicle with well under 50mg of alcohol.



No, that's being evasive, give me 1 reason why it's a requirement to be able to drink and drive? Explain to me 1 benefit other than cost of drinking and driving over any other alternative method of transport?



Because the volume consumed is too small to make a difference to driver performance.


Not in every single case for every single person so therefore, it's not 100%. 

5609 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #789445 29-Mar-2013 21:59
Send private message

jonb: I remember this story from the Herald last year:

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10835869

I'm a bit of a lightweight drinker, but after 4 bottles of Heineken (1.3 standard units each) I would still be under the drink drive limit but I would be 'wasted'.  2 bottles and I still wouldn't feel safe to drive.



Same here...and I'm 120KG / 190cm. 

My own rule of thumb is one standard drink per hour....which is the amount of alcohol I can metabolise. 

If I skulled 4 beers...I don't drive for 4 hours.... If I drink one beer per hour....I'll drive an hour after the last one. 





_____________________________________________________________________
If you order a Tesla, click my referral code below to order your car and get free stuff. 

 

My Tesla referral code: https://ts.la/steve52356


4694 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #789448 29-Mar-2013 22:19
Send private message

networkn:

I addressed this above. I don't use a car to make short trips, but in principle I see no problem with driving a vehicle with well under 50mg of alcohol.
No, that's being evasive, give me 1 reason why it's a requirement to be able to drink and drive? Explain to me 1 benefit other than cost of drinking and driving over any other alternative method of transport?


Convenience, personal safety, availability.

By the way, the cost of two beers is effectively around $5 whereas the cost of a taxi from town to home is at least $20 (or up to $80 for a longer distance) so I don't buy the argument that 'if you can afford to drink then you can afford a taxi'. We're talking about minimal quantities of alcohol here for which the cost is bugger all. Noone is advocating that you can knock back $100 worth of piss and then take the wheel.


Because the volume consumed is too small to make a difference to driver performance.


Not in every single case for every single person so therefore, it's not 100%. 


Of course it's not safe to consume alcohol before driving in every conceivable scenario. However if the amount consumed is very small then the individual is perfectly capable of judging whether they are within an adequate safety margin given the prevailing circumstances.

14728 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #789472 30-Mar-2013 00:35
Send private message

alasta:
networkn:

I addressed this above. I don't use a car to make short trips, but in principle I see no problem with driving a vehicle with well under 50mg of alcohol.
No, that's being evasive, give me 1 reason why it's a requirement to be able to drink and drive? Explain to me 1 benefit other than cost of drinking and driving over any other alternative method of transport?


Convenience, personal safety, availability.

By the way, the cost of two beers is effectively around $5 whereas the cost of a taxi from town to home is at least $20 (or up to $80 for a longer distance) so I don't buy the argument that 'if you can afford to drink then you can afford a taxi'. We're talking about minimal quantities of alcohol here for which the cost is bugger all. Noone is advocating that you can knock back $100 worth of piss and then take the wheel.


Because the volume consumed is too small to make a difference to driver performance.


Not in every single case for every single person so therefore, it's not 100%. 


Of course it's not safe to consume alcohol before driving in every conceivable scenario. However if the amount consumed is very small then the individual is perfectly capable of judging whether they are within an adequate safety margin given the prevailing circumstances.


If these individuals were indeed capable of judging whether they are within an adequate safety margin, presumably they would do that now and we would never have anyone stopped for DUI?

Sorry but most of the gimps you see on Police 10-7 being hauled over look as though they have escaped from either prison or a gypsy camp and can barely string a coherent sentence together. I wouldn't trust them with a decision as important as whether they are fit to drive having been in the pub.





Mad Scientist
22654 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #789473 30-Mar-2013 00:48
Send private message

Certain blood concentration of Alcohol and certain amount of fatigue impair drivers to the same exact extent ... A maths test for fatigue needed?

Alcohol impairs ... But so do other stuff ... Fatigue, peers (teens way more likely to crash if other teens on board), kids, arguing couple, hot pies, rain, thinking about business, etc ... But no, just put the alcohol limit to zero and the world is cured ....




Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


14728 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #789474 30-Mar-2013 00:49
Send private message

Scotland, Germany, France and Spain all have 50 mcg limits.

That means that one pint could put some people over the limit. That seems a workable solution to me.

They also deal with them somewhat more harshly than our wet lettuce judges seem to here.

Under current laws, which apply to the whole of Britain, drink-drivers face a maximum sentence of six months in prison, a fine of up to £5,000 and a 12-month ban.

That seems fair enough. The main problem we have is that there are still too many who think their right to drink and drive trumps anyone else's right not to be killed or injured by them. Sure, there are many factors that can contribute to a car accident but since alcohol is a definite factor and could easily be excluded it seems dumb not to.





1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic




News »

Pre-orders for Huawei MateBook 13 open now
Posted 14-Aug-2020 14:26


Freeview On Demand app launches on Sony Android TVs
Posted 6-Aug-2020 13:35


UFB hits more than one million connections
Posted 6-Aug-2020 09:42


D-Link A/NZ extends COVR Wi-Fi EasyMesh System series with new three-pack
Posted 4-Aug-2020 15:01


New Zealand software Rfider tracks coffee from Colombia all the way to New Zealand businesses
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:35


Logitech G launches Pro X Wireless gaming headset
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:21


Sony Alpha 7S III provides supreme imaging performance
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:11


Sony introduces first CFexpress Type A memory card
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:05


Marsello acquires Goody consolidating online and in-store marketing position
Posted 30-Jul-2020 16:26


Fonterra first major customer for Microsoft's New Zealand datacentre
Posted 30-Jul-2020 08:07


Everything we learnt at the IBM Cloud Forum 2020
Posted 29-Jul-2020 14:45


Dropbox launches native HelloSign workflow and data residency in Australia
Posted 29-Jul-2020 12:48


Spark launches 5G in Palmerston North
Posted 29-Jul-2020 09:50


Lenovo brings speed and smarter features to new 5G mobile gaming phone
Posted 28-Jul-2020 22:00


Withings raises $60 million to enable bridge between patients and healthcare
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:51



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.