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  Reply # 838820 18-Jun-2013 18:13
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Dratsab:Going back at least 4 years when I used to run briefings involving a number of different branches of council, the way it worked was the council contracted ADT Security (who operate the Parkwise brand) for warden duties. ADT are paid an agreed contract amount for this and the wardens are in turn paid by ADT.

When "caught out" by police for expired WOF/Licence label you may only get a warning, as you say, but that will depend on a number of factors. If you are ticketed and the expiry is only recent, say within a few weeks, you will generally be given a grace period (called compliance) in which to correct the problem and present evidence of its being corrected. Upon presentation of the required evidence within the required timeframe the fine will then be waived. You'll get no such joy from the council.


I don't know which council you are referring to but Wellington " contracts Tenix Solutions who subcontract Parkwise (a subsidiary of Armourguard) to monitor parking in the city.".

I see contracts and subcontracts as more clips out of the same ticket so there is less incentive to waive fines. The council does share in the fine revenue.

Wellington claims (I have no idea whether this is true)
"Council spokesman Richard MacLean said there had been a slight decline in the number of tickets issued over the past three years.

Motorists were given a month's grace period before being issued a ticket, he said.

"If the vehicle was seen on a public road during this time they would be given a caution notice as a reminder to get the vehicle legal.

"This looks like a ticket, but has no monetary penalty," he said." Dec 2012.

Other councils have grace periods. The Police are just as likely to issue a ticket that their back office refuse to waive as any council.

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  Reply # 838854 18-Jun-2013 19:07
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That's exactly why I believe OP should object. We have here a situation where multiple for-profit companies have a financial incentive to issue as many legally enforced penalties as they can as fast as they can, with absolutely no accountability to be accurate.

If I'm going to be paying a fine I want to feel certain that

a) The ticket is accurate - I don't think it's unreasonable to insist that I actually be guilty of the offence I'm accused of; and
b) The fine is used for the public benefit, not to line the pockets of shareholders





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  Reply # 839028 18-Jun-2013 23:46
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Bung: I don't know which council you are referring to but Wellington "contracts Tenix Solutions who subcontract Parkwise (a subsidiary of Armourguard) to monitor parking in the city" 

We're getting miles off topic here, but I am referring to Wellington City Council. ADT Armourguard is the correct name of the subcontractor - I used a short form through habit. They're owned by the multinational Tyco.

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  Reply # 840032 20-Jun-2013 08:48
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Slightly off topic.

Here is a vehicle license disc in South Africa. The red part is the Window sticker which you stick to the inside of your window which holds the disc in place. You can buy them with all sorts of messages. 



Maybe a good idea for the parking wardens in NZ. But a different message.



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  Reply # 840070 20-Jun-2013 09:20
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Klipspringer: 

Maybe a good idea for the parking wardens in NZ. But a different message.



Seems perfectly appropriate to me.




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  Reply # 840145 20-Jun-2013 10:59
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The message has to go direct to the council and councillors rather than someone who is outsourced.

The outcry over the Wellington parking camera car is an example.



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  Reply # 841192 21-Jun-2013 17:34
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So.....

Two days ago I sent an email to the council politely requesting all proof - photographic or otherwise - of the alleged offence. I advised that I intended to prove I was not parked in Conway Street as was alleged on the ticket.

I received the following response today:

"Thank you for the information supplied regarding the above infringement notice.
As a consequence, this Council's records have been amended accordingly and the notice is cancelled.
Thank you for your assistance."

The only information I supplied was that neither I nor my vehicle had ever been to Conway Street during my lifetime.

The lesson here is that it does not matter whether you committed an offence, what matters is whether you committed the offence you are accused of as stated on the ticket.

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  Reply # 841850 23-Jun-2013 09:06
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I once got a ticket for doing 102 on the motorway in a Hillman Avenger, the limit was 80 back then. The officer issuing the ticket asked if my car was an Avenger, he couldn't be bothered checking, I said nothing, I was driving a Hillman Minx (great teenage car in its day). I wrote in to say I do not own an Avenger and the ticket was waived. So you did the right thing - if there is any error on the ticket write in and it may be cancelled.

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  Reply # 841855 23-Jun-2013 09:16
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So I guess the moral of the story is that breaking the law is ok, it's the authorities to blame for getting it wrong? Hmmm, what a screwed up sense of morals some seem to have.




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  Reply # 841863 23-Jun-2013 09:43
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Wheelbarrow01:
The lesson here is that it does not matter whether you committed an offence, what matters is whether you committed the offence you are accused of as stated on the ticket.


Wrong. The lesson here is that you should have a currently licensed vehicle before you use it on a road. You wouldn't have been in this situation and we wouldn't have had this thread if you had done that.

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Reply # 841865 23-Jun-2013 09:45
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geek4me: So you did the right thing.

Sorry - it's not "the right thing". 

Well done for breaking the law and getting away with it on a technicality!  Personally, I don't think it's anything to be proud of.




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  Reply # 841866 23-Jun-2013 09:45
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So....
1) have you paid your rego? (because we dont want to be seeing another topic called 'am i insured if I dont have a current rego and wof).

2) They way I see it, the parking warden 'could' have been nice and wanted to you 'get off' on your own doing given you were not being stung for an actual parking duration infringment.

3) you cant blame your wife for anything car related... 'this is from the man saftey code'.

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  Reply # 841888 23-Jun-2013 10:24
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scuwp: So I guess the moral of the story is that breaking the law is ok, it's the authorities to blame for getting it wrong? Hmmm, what a screwed up sense of morals some seem to have.


No, the moral is that it is basic justice to expect to be guilty of the crime you're accused of. Letting it slide seems like a little thing, especially in this case, but it leads to places we don't want to go. There is nothing wrong with holding those who have power over you to a higher standard than you would hold yourself. Anybody who feels that they could not stand up to that kind of scrutiny can at any time feel free not to be in the police, the government, or a parking warden.

EDIT: I accidentally a word.




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  Reply # 841911 23-Jun-2013 12:05
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SaltyNZ:
scuwp: So I guess the moral of the story is that breaking the law is ok, it's the authorities to blame for getting it wrong? Hmmm, what a screwed up sense of morals some seem to have.


No, the moral is that it is basic justice to expect to be guilty of the crime you're accused of. Letting it slide seems like a little thing, especially in this case, but it leads to places we don't want to go. There is nothing wrong with holding those who have power over you to a higher standard than you would hold yourself. Anybody who feels that they could not stand up to that kind of scrutiny can at any time feel free not to be in the police, the government, or a parking warden.

EDIT: I accidentally a word.


Yes, but we have 3 pages of comments discussing what really was nothing more that a 'technicality'.  OP admits their 'guilt'.  The car was on a road without a valid licence to be there, end of story, or at least it should have been.  There is a big difference between being found 'not guilty' or being let off a ticket, especially on a silly technicality, and actually being 'innocent' of the charge.   I agree to holding authorities to account but in this case the offence was patently committed, and the OP was nothing more than lucky.    




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  Reply # 841915 23-Jun-2013 12:16
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scuwp:
SaltyNZ:
scuwp: So I guess the moral of the story is that breaking the law is ok, it's the authorities to blame for getting it wrong? Hmmm, what a screwed up sense of morals some seem to have.


No, the moral is that it is basic justice to expect to be guilty of the crime you're accused of. Letting it slide seems like a little thing, especially in this case, but it leads to places we don't want to go. There is nothing wrong with holding those who have power over you to a higher standard than you would hold yourself. Anybody who feels that they could not stand up to that kind of scrutiny can at any time feel free not to be in the police, the government, or a parking warden.

EDIT: I accidentally a word.


Yes, but we have 3 pages of comments discussing what really was nothing more that a 'technicality'.  OP admits their 'guilt'.  The car was on a road without a valid licence to be there, end of story, or at least it should have been.  There is a big difference between being found 'not guilty' or being let off a ticket, especially on a silly technicality, and actually being 'innocent' of the charge.   I agree to holding authorities to account but in this case the offence was patently committed, and the OP was nothing more than lucky.    


Sure, if the council had come back with 'Thanks for pointing out our mistake. Your amended ticket is enclosed. You have 28 days to pay' then that would be completely different. Technicalities are the only protection you have against abuse, be it lazy, stupid, malicious or all of the above. They really are there for a reason.




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