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Topic # 129021 1-Sep-2013 00:34
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I have been thinking we should get our household a couple of Fire Extinguishers. One for General Use and one for Kitchen/Electical. 

Would something like this be OK ?

http://www.trademe.co.nz/home-living/security-locks-alarms/other/auction-633375598.htm


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  Reply # 887655 1-Sep-2013 00:34
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Hmmmm. Here we go.




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  Reply # 887658 1-Sep-2013 00:46
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I'm guessing ABE in the first line is referring to what it is rated for...

Class A: Wood/Paper/Plastics
Class B: Flammable Liquids (Petrol/Oil)
Class E: Fires: Electrical

I'm not an expert, but there is Class F for cooking oils and fats which might be more effective for the kitchen. But I guess more house fires are electrical, in which case that extinguisher will do the job.





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  Reply # 887661 1-Sep-2013 00:52
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Do you think it's ok it's a 2012?

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  Reply # 887669 1-Sep-2013 04:46
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I think a fire blanket is a good option for the kitchen as well

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Reply # 887671 1-Sep-2013 07:06
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networkn: Do you think it's ok it's a 2012?
yeah that will be perfectly fine.  Also they have a anti compacting agent so you dont have to worry about the powder compacting like powder extinguishers used to do.




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  Reply # 887672 1-Sep-2013 07:15
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My understanding is that dry powder extinguishers need (or at least used to need) regular maintenance. The powder settles and when you need them, they don't work.

I agree that a fire blanket is a great option for the kitchen. I think CO2 is a good option for the home too, as long as they have pressure, they work.

I'd suggest asking the fire service, or maybe check their website. They'll have solid unbiased information.




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  Reply # 887673 1-Sep-2013 07:17
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Never mind, I've been corrected before i posted




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  Reply # 887681 1-Sep-2013 07:35
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andrewNZ: My understanding is that dry powder extinguishers need (or at least used to need) regular maintenance. The powder settles and when you need them, they don't work.

I agree that a fire blanket is a great option for the kitchen. I think CO2 is a good option for the home too, as long as they have pressure, they work.

I'd suggest asking the fire service, or maybe check their website. They'll have solid unbiased information.
thats the old ones from many years ago.  modern ones dont




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  Reply # 887684 1-Sep-2013 07:41
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Yogi02: I think a fire blanket is a good option for the kitchen as well


A pressurised fire extinguisher can move a liquid fire (think cooking oil) around rather than putting it out, so a blanket is a good idea.

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  Reply # 887685 1-Sep-2013 07:47
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RunningMan:
Yogi02: I think a fire blanket is a good option for the kitchen as well


A pressurised fire extinguisher can move a liquid fire (think cooking oil) around rather than putting it out, so a blanket is a good idea.
thinking about yeah fire blanket for home would be good option.  Fire extinguisher is excellent when used correctly on liquid fires but most home owners wont know the correct way to use it and end up spreading the fire.




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  Reply # 887698 1-Sep-2013 08:55
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http://www.fireextinguishersonline.co.nz/shop/extinguishers/dry-powder-fire-extinguisher-0-3kg

I would get one this and Fire blanket for the kitchen. Cleaning after using dry powder is tedious.





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  Reply # 887732 1-Sep-2013 10:59
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You should also be aware that the powder is very fine and that it gets everywhere after you use it.

When you add in that the powder is corrosive and will damage electronics after a while... It can get very expensive if someone sets it off without there being a proper fire.

Foam extinguishers or proper fire hoses are good alternatives, and a fire blanket is good too.

One good reason to stick with powder is that it lasts for 10 years, while a foam extinguisher only lasts for 5 years.

CO2 you really shouldn't have in your home, unless you intend to use it on your very expensive Hi-fi or other such electronics. The CO2 will be useless in a fire with any real amount of energy (so fire in wood etc. it will only have a short and temporary effect).




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  Reply # 887739 1-Sep-2013 11:34
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jarledb: You should also be aware that the powder is very fine and that it gets everywhere after you use it.

When you add in that the powder is corrosive and will damage electronics after a while... It can get very expensive if someone sets it off without there being a proper fire.

Foam extinguishers or proper fire hoses are good alternatives, and a fire blanket is good too.

One good reason to stick with powder is that it lasts for 10 years, while a foam extinguisher only lasts for 5 years.

CO2 you really shouldn't have in your home, unless you intend to use it on your very expensive Hi-fi or other such electronics. The CO2 will be useless in a fire with any real amount of energy (so fire in wood etc. it will only have a short and temporary effect).
you are correct but if it is a small fire that will save the house who cares about some damage to electrics. If it is bigger then just get out of house and dial 111. Not worth a life to attempt putting it out.  99 % of people wont have any idea of correctly using extinguishers




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  Reply # 888037 2-Sep-2013 07:48
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I was researching this recently but got a bit confused by all the options. Can anyone with experience say what type of extinguisher works best for a kitchen and maybe for general house fires? What size is best, 2/4/6/10kg?

A see a blanket mentioned, would that help with an oil fire on a stove?




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  Reply # 888038 2-Sep-2013 07:54
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timmmay: I was researching this recently but got a bit confused by all the options. Can anyone with experience say what type of extinguisher works best for a kitchen and maybe for general house fires? What size is best, 2/4/6/10kg?

A see a blanket mentioned, would that help with an oil fire on a stove?
ABE would be best all round and 2Kg fine.  If you need bigger one then you shouldnt be attempting to put it out and just call 111.   Fire Blanket on top is good for oil fire on stove.  Best it the lid for the container.  If fire too big to put lid on then throw fire blanket over and dial 111




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