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BTR

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  Reply # 888039 2-Sep-2013 07:58
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jarledb: You should also be aware that the powder is very fine and that it gets everywhere after you use it.

When you add in that the powder is corrosive and will damage electronics after a while... It can get very expensive if someone sets it off without there being a proper fire.

Foam extinguishers or proper fire hoses are good alternatives, and a fire blanket is good too.

One good reason to stick with powder is that it lasts for 10 years, while a foam extinguisher only lasts for 5 years.

CO2 you really shouldn't have in your home, unless you intend to use it on your very expensive Hi-fi or other such electronics. The CO2 will be useless in a fire with any real amount of energy (so fire in wood etc. it will only have a short and temporary effect).


Fire hose? Who wants a fire hose in their house?

I would recommend having a look around, Mitre 10 sell extinguishers. Choose something you are happy with and that fits your budget. Fire blankets are cheap as is a bag of flour for cooking fires. 


At the end of the day having something is better than nothing!



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  Reply # 888041 2-Sep-2013 08:01
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If only I saw your post earlier.
Warehouse were selling extinguishers for $20

http://www.thewarehouse.co.nz/red/redalert/fire-safety-deals

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 888071 2-Sep-2013 08:48
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Gilco2: If you need bigger one then you shouldnt be attempting to put it out and just call 111.


While I agree, it also depends a bit on where you live. If you live in the sticks, the options are put it out yourself, or let it burn to the ground.




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Stu

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  Reply # 888075 2-Sep-2013 08:57
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That's what insurance is for. No point trying to save that which can be repaired/replaced, if you are killed or seriously injured in the process. The smoke, flames and falling debris aren't often very forgiving.




Keep calm, and carry on posting.

 

 

 

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  Reply # 888078 2-Sep-2013 08:58
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BTR: Fire hose? Who wants a fire hose in their house?

I would recommend having a look around, Mitre 10 sell extinguishers. Choose something you are happy with and that fits your budget. Fire blankets are cheap as is a bag of flour for cooking fires. 


At the end of the day having something is better than nothing!




What are you planning to do with the bag of flour?

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  Reply # 888082 2-Sep-2013 09:11
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Interesting comparison of fire/extinguisher types on that website someone linked to earlier. It says ABE for general purpose, wet chemical for oil/kitchen fires (very expensive), CO2 has some effect against oil fires but they're expensive too. Blankets are $30 for 1x1m and $50 for 1.2 x 1.8m. 

Keeping an ABE extinguisher in the kitchen may provide a false sense of security.




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  Reply # 888086 2-Sep-2013 09:17
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timmmay: Interesting comparison of fire/extinguisher types on that website someone linked to earlier. It says ABE for general purpose, wet chemical for oil/kitchen fires (very expensive), CO2 has some effect against oil fires but they're expensive too. Blankets are $30 for 1x1m and $50 for 1.2 x 1.8m. 

Keeping an ABE extinguisher in the kitchen may provide a false sense of security.
yes if you are inexperienced with the extinguisher it is next to useless.  CO2 might be more effective for average user then throw blanket. But CO2 useless where windy as well.

Having personal experience with fire over the years, if it is around 300mm high use either the extinguisher or blanket or both and ring 111.  If higher just get out and ring 111.  Your life is way more important than your property and toys etc.  It is very frightening the speed which fire can travel and not worth the risk




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  Reply # 888087 2-Sep-2013 09:19
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BigHammer: That's what insurance is for. No point trying to save that which can be repaired/replaced, if you are killed or seriously injured in the process. The smoke, flames and falling debris aren't often very forgiving.


I think you missed the point. But I'm not going to argue about it.




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  Reply # 888095 2-Sep-2013 09:32
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Gilco2: yes if you are inexperienced with the extinguisher it is next to useless.  CO2 might be more effective for average user then throw blanket. But CO2 useless where windy as well.

Having personal experience with fire over the years, if it is around 300mm high use either the extinguisher or blanket or both and ring 111.  If higher just get out and ring 111.  Your life is way more important than your property and toys etc.  It is very frightening the speed which fire can travel and not worth the risk


Do you think it's worth getting a 2kg CO2 extinguisher for the kitchen for $180? Or just get the blanket? Getting close enough to a fire to throw a blanket over it doesn't sound ideal, but if CO2 isn't great no point given it's expensive.

I have up to date insurance, photos of my home and all contents stored online, receipts online, professional valuer has assessed it, and fire alarm wired to the monitored burglar alarm. I like my stuff and want to protect it but tbh if I had to replace it all it wouldn't bother me that much, I'd prefer to get us out safely.




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BTR

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  Reply # 888126 2-Sep-2013 09:57
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This is sort of OT but if you are serious about fire safety and saving your house why not have sprinklers installed.

http://homesprinklers.fire.org.nz

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  Reply # 888133 2-Sep-2013 10:06
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timmmay:
Gilco2: yes if you are inexperienced with the extinguisher it is next to useless.  CO2 might be more effective for average user then throw blanket. But CO2 useless where windy as well.

Having personal experience with fire over the years, if it is around 300mm high use either the extinguisher or blanket or both and ring 111.  If higher just get out and ring 111.  Your life is way more important than your property and toys etc.  It is very frightening the speed which fire can travel and not worth the risk


Do you think it's worth getting a 2kg CO2 extinguisher for the kitchen for $180? Or just get the blanket? Getting close enough to a fire to throw a blanket over it doesn't sound ideal, but if CO2 isn't great no point given it's expensive.

I have up to date insurance, photos of my home and all contents stored online, receipts online, professional valuer has assessed it, and fire alarm wired to the monitored burglar alarm. I like my stuff and want to protect it but tbh if I had to replace it all it wouldn't bother me that much, I'd prefer to get us out safely.
to be effective you will be approximately same distance to use extinguisher or blanket.  Personally I prefer CO2 where there is no strong windy breeze etc but best all rounder is the ABE powder one.  But to be any good they have to be used correctly and many people dont really know how as they havent trained with them




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  Reply # 888149 2-Sep-2013 10:19
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There's unlikely to be a strong breeze in a kitchen...

I'm definitely getting a 2kg ABE for general purpose, a blanket for the kitchen, just deciding on the CO2 one. Might skip it for now. Will also look into usage instructions.

btw the trademe one isn't cheap, some websites basic price is about the same and includes shipping.




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  Reply # 888153 2-Sep-2013 10:31
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timmmay: ...I have up to date insurance, photos of my home and all contents stored online, receipts online, professional valuer has assessed it, and fire alarm wired to the monitored burglar alarm. I like my stuff and want to protect it but tbh if I had to replace it all it wouldn't bother me that much, I'd prefer to get us out safely.


Insurance, photos and fire alarms do nothing to protect your stuff.  Fire alarms are no good for putting out fires.

If you want protection then BTR's post above is the answer.  In a new house residential sprinklers typically cost less than the carpets. Unfortunately they're not as glamorous as carpets.  And although they pretty much eliminate the fire risk you can't get premium reductions from NZ insurers.  In an existing house it's a bit harder unless you have a good attic space to work in.




McLean

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  Reply # 888160 2-Sep-2013 10:39
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mclean: Insurance, photos and fire alarms do nothing to protect your stuff.  Fire alarms are no good for putting out fires.

If you want protection then BTR's post above is the answer.  In a new house residential sprinklers typically cost less than the carpets. Unfortunately they're not as glamorous as carpets.  And although they pretty much eliminate the fire risk you can't get premium reductions from NZ insurers.  In an existing house it's a bit harder unless you have a good attic space to work in.


Obviously, but replacement is almost as good as protection so long as everyone gets out ok. Very little of what we have is irreplaceable, at least to me. Sprinkler sounds like a good idea for a new house, retrofit in my old house with lowered ceilings would be a bit of a nightmare.




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  Reply # 888180 2-Sep-2013 11:09
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Check out the video here of a small foam extinguisher (500 ml) that can do A, B and F fires. The site and videos are in norwegian, but you get to see how the fire extinguisher works on grease fires and vegetable oil fires.

http://www.slukkeskum.no/video/video-110-slukkeskum-multipro

Its really easy to use, and is good for grease fires and can extinguish small fires.

(Disclaimer: I own part of the company that produce these).




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