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  Reply # 908112 4-Oct-2013 20:06
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nickb800:
heisenberg:
nickb800: I'd suggest that you enrol in whatever degree, and make up your first year with one of everything (compsci, info, accounting, econ, marketing...). Figure out what you like, and at the end of your first year you can transfer those points to whatever sort of double/conjoint/etc that fits your interests and seems valuable.

Very few people follow through with what they planned to do at uni, so don't worry about starting with a perfect plan. I speak from experience here - I came to Canterbury to do engineering, ended up doing a BSc majoring in economics & geography.

As in my case, doing a double major (conjoint at vic?) instead of a double degree meant 4 years vs. 5 years. I wanted to keep studying at the end of 4 years so I went on to complete an honours degree. This arguably makes you much more valuable than an undergrad(or 2) and by 4 years you usually have a better idea of what you want to be doing


That is basically my plan at this stage. I will do core papers for 3 majors Computer science, accounting and possibly finance. I will then be able to decide what to get into the second year which is probably the best thing to do at this stage.

I plan to do 3 majors with a conjoint degree of BCom and BSc and when i come out of uni i should have 2 degrees. BCom majoring in Accounting and finance. BSc majoring in computer science. At the end i can decide which degree i want to do honors in.

Does this sound good? I am kind of feeling a bit more confident now :)


Sounds like a solid approach for your first year. I'd just emphasise that a conjoint degree (as opposed to a double/triple major) will take longer and won't be worth much more. Cross-crediting between degrees is limited, so you end up doing a lot of filler papers (which cost time and money). That's why I'm a big fan of double/triple majors instead, as you get the same skills more quickly. As at Canterbury you can fit economics as a science degree major, I'd be trying to fit your computing stuff into a commerce or info systems degree alongside your commerce papers. If you want to do a 5th year, use it to get an honours degree rather than a double degree. 

That said, things change during your degree, and if you get good work experience during and a solid job offer at the end then honours will add little value for you (especially in computing as Timmay said)


I understand where you are coming from and i will contact victoria and ask about this.

So what you are saying is a BCom degree with 3 majors. Accounting, Finance and an outside major of computer science. right?

My question is, if a degree requires 360 points, wouldn't having 3 majors make you go over the points? does that really matter or mean anything?



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  Reply # 908113 4-Oct-2013 20:08
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I think double degree is a waste of time money and energy. but that's me.

WORK BACKWARDS ... what do you want to achieve once you graduate?

what skills do you need to get a starting position?

what degree/papers prop you up for that starting position?

note: a piece of paper and skills are almost mutually exclusive. having a double degree doesn't mean you can do squat. being amazing at something doesn't mean you've got a PhD in that subject!




Swype on iOS is detrimental to accurate typing. Apologies in advance.


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 908116 4-Oct-2013 20:12
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heisenberg:
nickb800:
heisenberg:
nickb800: I'd suggest that you enrol in whatever degree, and make up your first year with one of everything (compsci, info, accounting, econ, marketing...). Figure out what you like, and at the end of your first year you can transfer those points to whatever sort of double/conjoint/etc that fits your interests and seems valuable.

Very few people follow through with what they planned to do at uni, so don't worry about starting with a perfect plan. I speak from experience here - I came to Canterbury to do engineering, ended up doing a BSc majoring in economics & geography.

As in my case, doing a double major (conjoint at vic?) instead of a double degree meant 4 years vs. 5 years. I wanted to keep studying at the end of 4 years so I went on to complete an honours degree. This arguably makes you much more valuable than an undergrad(or 2) and by 4 years you usually have a better idea of what you want to be doing


That is basically my plan at this stage. I will do core papers for 3 majors Computer science, accounting and possibly finance. I will then be able to decide what to get into the second year which is probably the best thing to do at this stage.

I plan to do 3 majors with a conjoint degree of BCom and BSc and when i come out of uni i should have 2 degrees. BCom majoring in Accounting and finance. BSc majoring in computer science. At the end i can decide which degree i want to do honors in.

Does this sound good? I am kind of feeling a bit more confident now :)


Sounds like a solid approach for your first year. I'd just emphasise that a conjoint degree (as opposed to a double/triple major) will take longer and won't be worth much more. Cross-crediting between degrees is limited, so you end up doing a lot of filler papers (which cost time and money). That's why I'm a big fan of double/triple majors instead, as you get the same skills more quickly. As at Canterbury you can fit economics as a science degree major, I'd be trying to fit your computing stuff into a commerce or info systems degree alongside your commerce papers. If you want to do a 5th year, use it to get an honours degree rather than a double degree. 

That said, things change during your degree, and if you get good work experience during and a solid job offer at the end then honours will add little value for you (especially in computing as Timmay said)


I understand where you are coming from and i will contact victoria and ask about this.

So what you are saying is a BCom degree with 3 majors. Accounting, Finance and an outside major of computer science. right?

My question is, if a degree requires 360 points, wouldn't having 3 majors make you go over the points? does that really matter or mean anything?




Yep! I'm saying that your better to do over 360pts for one degree (say 400pts) rather than the the ~600pts(?) for a double major (i think the max cross credit is ~100pts). Do check the details on this for your degree though



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  Reply # 908117 4-Oct-2013 20:15
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nickb800:
heisenberg:
nickb800:
heisenberg:
nickb800: I'd suggest that you enrol in whatever degree, and make up your first year with one of everything (compsci, info, accounting, econ, marketing...). Figure out what you like, and at the end of your first year you can transfer those points to whatever sort of double/conjoint/etc that fits your interests and seems valuable.

Very few people follow through with what they planned to do at uni, so don't worry about starting with a perfect plan. I speak from experience here - I came to Canterbury to do engineering, ended up doing a BSc majoring in economics & geography.

As in my case, doing a double major (conjoint at vic?) instead of a double degree meant 4 years vs. 5 years. I wanted to keep studying at the end of 4 years so I went on to complete an honours degree. This arguably makes you much more valuable than an undergrad(or 2) and by 4 years you usually have a better idea of what you want to be doing


That is basically my plan at this stage. I will do core papers for 3 majors Computer science, accounting and possibly finance. I will then be able to decide what to get into the second year which is probably the best thing to do at this stage.

I plan to do 3 majors with a conjoint degree of BCom and BSc and when i come out of uni i should have 2 degrees. BCom majoring in Accounting and finance. BSc majoring in computer science. At the end i can decide which degree i want to do honors in.

Does this sound good? I am kind of feeling a bit more confident now :)


Sounds like a solid approach for your first year. I'd just emphasise that a conjoint degree (as opposed to a double/triple major) will take longer and won't be worth much more. Cross-crediting between degrees is limited, so you end up doing a lot of filler papers (which cost time and money). That's why I'm a big fan of double/triple majors instead, as you get the same skills more quickly. As at Canterbury you can fit economics as a science degree major, I'd be trying to fit your computing stuff into a commerce or info systems degree alongside your commerce papers. If you want to do a 5th year, use it to get an honours degree rather than a double degree. 

That said, things change during your degree, and if you get good work experience during and a solid job offer at the end then honours will add little value for you (especially in computing as Timmay said)


I understand where you are coming from and i will contact victoria and ask about this.

So what you are saying is a BCom degree with 3 majors. Accounting, Finance and an outside major of computer science. right?

My question is, if a degree requires 360 points, wouldn't having 3 majors make you go over the points? does that really matter or mean anything?




Yep! I'm saying that your better to do over 360pts for one degree (say 400pts) rather than the the ~600pts(?) for a double major (i think the max cross credit is ~100pts). Do check the details on this for your degree though


Ok i see. I will look into one degree with 3 majors and then decided out of the my options.

I have been reading up a lot about software engineering and computer science and it seems, you learn programming in both and i dont really seem to understand the difference. What do yo learn that is actually difference. Victoria has nothing on its website :/

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  Reply # 908130 4-Oct-2013 20:44
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heisenberg:

Ok i see. I will look into one degree with 3 majors and then decided out of the my options.

I have been reading up a lot about software engineering and computer science and it seems, you learn programming in both and i dont really seem to understand the difference. What do yo learn that is actually difference. Victoria has nothing on its website :/


Try to talk to some lecturers. Or former students (ha), there are a few of us around. I don't know really what the difference is, I did computer science and that included a number of software engineering papers. I think the engineering degree is supposed to be more practical in some way, but I don't think this makes much difference to your employability.

The reason everyone offers software engineering as a separate degree, is because of government funding. In the mid 2000s, govt said they'd fund engineering courses at twice the per student rate as science courses. So every university which didn't already have an engineering programme developed one quickly. Usually this was done by scrawling "engineering" in front of things they already taught. And lots of them taught software engineering as part of their computer science programme. I was a graduate student (finishing up an MSc) at the time this was happening so I got to hear all about it.

Find out what you enjoy, ideally something that you will be able to find work doing too. I'm told that the Wellington IT job market is pretty good for jobseekers. Certainly I've never had trouble finding work here. VUW Computer Science will teach you Java rather than C# but after you've learnt a few programming languages they're all pretty similar. In my current job I have had to deal with Java, C#, C, Ruby, Perl and probably a few more I've temporarily forgotten about. The lessons you learn about how to solve problems and structure software will apply to many different languages and technologies.


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  Reply # 908136 4-Oct-2013 20:58
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heisenberg: At this stage i have decided to apply for a conjoint degree with triple majors as above but i can change that in the second year you see as all my first year is just core courses. I will only be 3-4 courses behind everyone else but it will be worth it as i will get to try both. A conjoint degree would also allow me to have a fall back which is quite important to me and it only means a year and a half extra for the second degree.

Also, what kind of jobs can computer science get me compared to software engineering. From my understanding you are learning programming languages in both?

Cheers guys!


Not really sure. Computer science sounds more like theory, software engineering more practical. You'd probably end up in the same job, but you'd be better at it with an engineering degree. Computer science might be useful if you're in the 1% that do research.

deadlyllama: Try to talk to some lecturers. Or former students (ha), there are a few of us around. I don't know really what the difference is, I did computer science and that included a number of software engineering papers. I think the engineering degree is supposed to be more practical in some way, but I don't think this makes much difference to your employability.


Lecturers tend to be pretty smart, but not always as practical. 




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  Reply # 908138 4-Oct-2013 21:09
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Hey mate

Just finished my degree in July having studied for a BCOM (Bachelor of Commerce) at Vic Uni majoring in Accounting and Commercial Law. Like you I began with an interest in computer science and accounting so I originally began with my BCOM with ACCY with COMP SCI as an outside major (so I didn't have to do a bachelor of science). I advise that if you want to do comp sci don't do a conjoint science degree as it will waste so much time taking all the other required papers for the degree; just do comp sci as an outside major. Someone else said that conjoint degrees aren't as useful as you'd think and I would have to agree. Focusing on one degree is the best thing to do simply because it takes around half the time and you won't be taking papers you won't enjoy and that don't go towards your career.

If you want more information i'm happy to provide it :)

insane: By themselves an Accounting or Marketing major will not get you onto the kind of $$ you may expect. Sadly starting wages in those industries is rather low. 


Accounting major won't get you into the kind of $$ he's expecting? You're joking right?

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  Reply # 908143 4-Oct-2013 21:21
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I should also add that if you're doing an accounting major you can add on the commercial law major simply by taking one extra COML 300 level paper, which I found to be very beneficial anyway as I the elective I did was employment law.

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  Reply # 908148 4-Oct-2013 21:30
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timmmay: Kids these days. There are too many experts on conservation and not enough engineers and scientists. You don't choose your degree based on what you find fun, you have to look to what job it will get you into, your career path, and your income. 


I completely disagree with what's in bold, and if it were true then why are so many people doing pointless BA's? (Note: not all BA's are pointless).



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  Reply # 908160 4-Oct-2013 22:03
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JokezNZ: I should also add that if you're doing an accounting major you can add on the commercial law major simply by taking one extra COML 300 level paper, which I found to be very beneficial anyway as I the elective I did was employment law.


If only one more paper is required to do a commercial law major, should i just do 3 majors in BCom. Finance, accounting and commercial law. Also, i cant seem to find the requirements for chartered accountancy.

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  Reply # 908175 4-Oct-2013 22:12
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From the pdf on this page http://www.nzica.com/atis.aspx


You need to do three years of study, attain a bachelors degree and do those papers. As I said yesterday and also JokezNZ said, to get a major in commercial law only one extra com law paper is needed.

they've lessoned the requirements in the past couple of years. You used to have to get a bachelors then do a year of postgrad study then another 4 years in the chartered accountants program. now it's just 3 and 3.



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  Reply # 908180 4-Oct-2013 22:21
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JarrodM: From the pdf on this page http://www.nzica.com/atis.aspx


You need to do three years of study, attain a bachelors degree and do those papers. As I said yesterday and also JokezNZ said, to get a major in commercial law only one extra com law paper is needed.

they've lessoned the requirements in the past couple of years. You used to have to get a bachelors then do a year of postgrad study then another 4 years in the chartered accountants program. now it's just 3 and 3.


Thank you so much man! I was looking for something like this all day



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  Reply # 908185 4-Oct-2013 22:33
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ive been looking at future courses for accounting and none of them have commercial law in them so how come i only need to do one paper to get a commercial law major?


cheers

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  Reply # 908186 4-Oct-2013 22:38
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heisenberg:
JarrodM: From the pdf on this page http://www.nzica.com/atis.aspx


You need to do three years of study, attain a bachelors degree and do those papers. As I said yesterday and also JokezNZ said, to get a major in commercial law only one extra com law paper is needed.

they've lessoned the requirements in the past couple of years. You used to have to get a bachelors then do a year of postgrad study then another 4 years in the chartered accountants program. now it's just 3 and 3.


Thank you so much man! I was looking for something like this all day


some tips:
even though the 7 100-level papers are "core" papers they don't all need to be done in first year. So if you are sure you want to do accounting I advise leaving a couple of the papers til later years, as a prerequisite to fina 201/211 is ECON140 and QUAN111. these are only offered in the 2nd trimester (or over summer), so if you don't do these first year, you can't really start fina until like 3rd year (fine if you just do accounting major, but not if you plan doing a fina major too).


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  Reply # 908187 4-Oct-2013 22:41
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heisenberg: ive been looking at future courses for accounting and none of them have commercial law in them so how come i only need to do one paper to get a commercial law major?


cheers


The one extra paper only occurs if you go for the CA requirements too. 

"The current Commercial Law major consists of the following courses:

 

  • COML 203, 204; one course from COML 205, 206, TAXN 201
  • COML 310; two further courses from COML 300-399*
* One of these may be replaced by an approved course from TAXN 300-399."


To meet the requirements you take care of the papers I underlined, leaving just the one further course from COML 300-399.

EDIT: it doesn't seem to show up underlined, but hopefully you can figure it out from the little explanation underneath.

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