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  Reply # 923742 29-Oct-2013 19:00
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Things like this are a lesson in life. Sorry to hear that happened. If you paid using 'buy now' and paid by credit card, you maybe able to get a chargeback if you purchased within the last month. Otherwise the only way is probably to arrange with the seller a refund/ part refund less their costs.

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  Reply # 923759 29-Oct-2013 19:46
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Geektastic:
bazzer:
Geektastic: Or you make the tickets automatically invalid unless the credit card used to buy them is presented at the venue on the day.

As usual, NZ business is run to suit the business not the customers!

Are you kidding me? If this were the case (as it is for the NIN/QOTSA gig mentioned) you wouldn't have had the chance to buy your wife the tickets she so desperately wanted. I guess this would be a solution, since you wouldn't be in the situation you now find yourself. I'm sure the ticket situation is no different in your beloved homeland.

In my opinion, the problem is only exasperated by people who insist on paying inflated prices for tickets in the secondhand market. Have you even contacted the person you bought the tickets off to see if they'll help sort it out? I wouldn't trust that they are necessarily in the same situation as you. It's a nice excuse to say "the reason I am selling these tickets for more than face value is because I had to buy them at more than face value from someone else and now I can't go and I'm just trying to recover my costs" but it doesn't make it true.

Regardless of whether or not that seller purchased from someone else I think they need to refund you the money. The sold you tickets to an event that is no longer taking place. It's their responsibility to get their own money back from further up the chain (however many links that might be).


No, not kidding. They do that with cinema tickets in many countries - you order online and inset the payment card in a machine in the cinema foyer whereupon it prints your tickets. No reason why it would not work for other tickets and it would stop scalping stone dead.


Cinema tickets in New Zealand work the same way. Just like touts in other countries do.

I'm not sure how your default position to blame New Zealand businesses all is here?

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 923768 29-Oct-2013 20:03
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Handle9:
Geektastic:
bazzer:
Geektastic: Or you make the tickets automatically invalid unless the credit card used to buy them is presented at the venue on the day.

As usual, NZ business is run to suit the business not the customers!

Are you kidding me? If this were the case (as it is for the NIN/QOTSA gig mentioned) you wouldn't have had the chance to buy your wife the tickets she so desperately wanted. I guess this would be a solution, since you wouldn't be in the situation you now find yourself. I'm sure the ticket situation is no different in your beloved homeland.

In my opinion, the problem is only exasperated by people who insist on paying inflated prices for tickets in the secondhand market. Have you even contacted the person you bought the tickets off to see if they'll help sort it out? I wouldn't trust that they are necessarily in the same situation as you. It's a nice excuse to say "the reason I am selling these tickets for more than face value is because I had to buy them at more than face value from someone else and now I can't go and I'm just trying to recover my costs" but it doesn't make it true.

Regardless of whether or not that seller purchased from someone else I think they need to refund you the money. The sold you tickets to an event that is no longer taking place. It's their responsibility to get their own money back from further up the chain (however many links that might be).


No, not kidding. They do that with cinema tickets in many countries - you order online and inset the payment card in a machine in the cinema foyer whereupon it prints your tickets. No reason why it would not work for other tickets and it would stop scalping stone dead.


Cinema tickets in New Zealand work the same way. Just like touts in other countries do.

I'm not sure how your default position to blame New Zealand businesses all is here?


unfortunately I think the op has a real dislike of NZ businesses well those he has dealt with and I'm pretty sure his attitude won't change anytime soon.




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  Reply # 923783 29-Oct-2013 20:31
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jeffnz:
Handle9:
Geektastic:
bazzer:
Geektastic: Or you make the tickets automatically invalid unless the credit card used to buy them is presented at the venue on the day.

As usual, NZ business is run to suit the business not the customers!

Are you kidding me? If this were the case (as it is for the NIN/QOTSA gig mentioned) you wouldn't have had the chance to buy your wife the tickets she so desperately wanted. I guess this would be a solution, since you wouldn't be in the situation you now find yourself. I'm sure the ticket situation is no different in your beloved homeland.

In my opinion, the problem is only exasperated by people who insist on paying inflated prices for tickets in the secondhand market. Have you even contacted the person you bought the tickets off to see if they'll help sort it out? I wouldn't trust that they are necessarily in the same situation as you. It's a nice excuse to say "the reason I am selling these tickets for more than face value is because I had to buy them at more than face value from someone else and now I can't go and I'm just trying to recover my costs" but it doesn't make it true.

Regardless of whether or not that seller purchased from someone else I think they need to refund you the money. The sold you tickets to an event that is no longer taking place. It's their responsibility to get their own money back from further up the chain (however many links that might be).


No, not kidding. They do that with cinema tickets in many countries - you order online and inset the payment card in a machine in the cinema foyer whereupon it prints your tickets. No reason why it would not work for other tickets and it would stop scalping stone dead.


Cinema tickets in New Zealand work the same way. Just like touts in other countries do.

I'm not sure how your default position to blame New Zealand businesses all is here?


unfortunately I think the op has a real dislike of NZ businesses well those he has dealt with and I'm pretty sure his attitude won't change anytime soon.


Not until they realise that the customer comes first not their needs or wishes.

To return to the point, refunding someone who has sold the product they paid you for and relying on some sort of vague honour system for any other buyers of the product seems to fly in the face of sanity and is only being done to make life easy for Ticketmaster not the owners of the tickets. Ticketmaster expressly permit on-selling and assuming that original purchasers will 'do the decent thing' is just lazy thinking.

Ticketmaster presumably do not want to support scalping but their system ensures that anyone scalping tickets wins twice if the event is cancelled. No amount of repeating that Trade Me sellers should do the right thing (or that any other seller who sold them any other way should) is going to alter the fact that there is something fundamentally wrong when the legal owner of a ticket cannot get a refund from the organiser in the event that the concert etc is cancelled.





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  Reply # 923798 29-Oct-2013 21:08
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jeffnz: don't buy off scalpers then they will disappear


far too simple

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  Reply # 923819 29-Oct-2013 21:36
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If I had sold some tickets on TradeMe I would be hastily claiming I was not the original purchaser. ;)

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  Reply # 924012 30-Oct-2013 10:02
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Someone who bought off Trademe needs to go to Campbell Live and Fair Go. It is the sort of thing they would lap up.



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  Reply # 926418 2-Nov-2013 23:23
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I came across this edifying quote from a Trade Me spokesman on the 3 News website.

"I would suggest that if you sold your tickets on Trade Me and you claimed a refund back from Ticketmaster, that'd be a pretty uncool thing to do and it wouldn't really be in the spirit of dealing on Trade Me," says Mr Duffy."

Ebay = Buyer Protection

Trade Me = Wow, that's pretty uncool man.....you're harshing our mellow!






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  Reply # 926422 3-Nov-2013 00:16
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Then don't use trademe, it's pretty simple really.

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  Reply # 926443 3-Nov-2013 06:16
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Buy from the official source then one has protection and caveat emptor is greatly diminished. Buy otherwise then let the buyer beware.




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  Reply # 926446 3-Nov-2013 06:56
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KiwiNZ: Buy from the official source then one has protection and caveat emptor is greatly diminished. Buy otherwise then let the buyer beware.


The problem with these ticket scalpers is that they buy as many tickets as possible from the official sources, then when the official sources are sold out they put them on Trademe. I've always wondered what % of ticket sales are sold on. I would imagine its quiet high.

Trademe buyer protection would be the best way to fix this. Why we don't have it here in NZ is beyond me.

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  Reply # 926448 3-Nov-2013 07:23
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Klipspringer:
KiwiNZ: Buy from the official source then one has protection and caveat emptor is greatly diminished. Buy otherwise then let the buyer beware.


The problem with these ticket scalpers is that they buy as many tickets as possible from the official sources, then when the official sources are sold out they put them on Trademe. I've always wondered what % of ticket sales are sold on. I would imagine its quiet high.

Trademe buyer protection would be the best way to fix this. Why we don't have it here in NZ is beyond me.


Trade me is not responsible, just like newspapers were not responsible for the goods sold in the old wanted to sell classifieds.

The buyer and the seller are responsible. There is no compulsion to buy from dubious sources.




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  Reply # 926451 3-Nov-2013 07:42
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The problem is more the fact that

a) Ticketmaster permit the onselling of tickets when, for example, you cannot attend an event for legitimate reasons
b) The purchaser of the ticket is the legal owner of the ticket and entitled to the benefit of it whether they were the original owner or not
c) Ticketmaster - despite permitting (a) and accepting (b) do not then offer refunds to the person surrendering tickets for a cancelled event but only to a person who originally bought them regardless of whether they are in possession of them or not

I can think of no other situation where this odd anomaly exists: if I buy your car for example and a year later the manufacturer issues a recall notice, they will not refuse to carry out the work on the car because I am not the original buyer: they accept (and the law supports) that as owner of legal title to the vehicle I am entitled to the benefit of that recall.

The problem could be stopped by having a method of creating tickets that could not be sold on, only returned to the vendor for a refund if you cannot attend and the vendor can then on-sell OR by Ticketmaster only refunding persons who surrender actual tickets, not just giving free money to people who may or may not still be the legal owner of the 'goods'. Trade Me could also add a condition that a ticket vendor expressly accepts liability for refund in the event of a cancelled event.

As usual, no one wants to actually be responsible for anything, it seems. Issuing statements to the press that it would be 'uncool' of a seller not to refund is ridiculous. For the record, the seller I bought mine from is ignoring communication despite Trade Me's involvement and I doubt that is unusual.





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  Reply # 926745 3-Nov-2013 21:39
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Well to be honest, consider yourself lucky it's not a ticket to a major athletics event (like the Auckland Marathon) - there's a pearler of a clause in the terms and conditions that says that in the event of inclement weather, the organisers reserve the right to cancel the event, in which case the ticket purchase price is non-refundable.

That's right, if they cancel your ticket they keep your money. Hell, they could make a mint just running the registrations then "oops, cancelled" at the last minute. Rock away with 10,000 * $110 and 6,000 x $150 - $2,000,000 for nothing. Not bad huh?

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  Reply # 926800 4-Nov-2013 00:41
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Kyanar: Well to be honest, consider yourself lucky it's not a ticket to a major athletics event (like the Auckland Marathon) - there's a pearler of a clause in the terms and conditions that says that in the event of inclement weather, the organisers reserve the right to cancel the event, in which case the ticket purchase price is non-refundable.

That's right, if they cancel your ticket they keep your money. Hell, they could make a mint just running the registrations then "oops, cancelled" at the last minute. Rock away with 10,000 * $110 and 6,000 x $150 - $2,000,000 for nothing. Not bad huh?


Haha don't be daft. They would need to prove the event could not have been run safely. It's disingenuous to suggest otherwise.

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