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  #959581 31-Dec-2013 14:11
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I think it's a good idea to stop unnecessary radiation (WiFi)





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  #959583 31-Dec-2013 14:18
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It sounds like it's the parents, not the kids, who are most in need of going to primary school to get an education.


 
 
 
 


gzt

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  #959607 31-Dec-2013 16:01
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Leaving aside the specifics there is very little evidence for harm in general but enough that the precautionary principle could be and was applied here at no cost. Easy decision for the school in the circumstances vs a substantial parent group. Imho lower power networking like bluetooth could be considered as a solution and could be more widely used.

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  #959639 31-Dec-2013 16:35
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If only the parents of these kids had got them their MMRW (measles, mumps, rubella and WiFi) vaccinations....




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  #959673 31-Dec-2013 18:16
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This guy is local from NZ and had completed a huge amount of research piror to his death.
Experts say that if he was still alive… the theory would have been proven and published by now…

http://www.neilcherry.com


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  #959705 31-Dec-2013 19:27
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Goosey: This guy is local from NZ and had completed a huge amount of research piror to his death.
Experts say that if he was still alive… the theory would have been proven and published by now…

http://www.neilcherry.com



So that link takes you to a page that asserts that all EM radiation is bad and causes cancer and allsorts and then invites you to pay to read the full reports.

Is this real science or just another way to extract money from gullible people?


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  #959706 31-Dec-2013 19:31
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ajobbins: WiFi gives off Fluoride vapour and chemtrails. Duh


No, the chemtrails are there to activate the fluoride and make our minds more susceptible to the thought control signals that the NSA beams out over WiFi in order to keep us believing in the moon landings.

 
 
 
 


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  #959708 31-Dec-2013 19:37
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  #959745 31-Dec-2013 22:16
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They should really stop the bus service. The emissions definitely cause cancer. Kids should walk and risk gunshots, those definitely do not cause cancer.




Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


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  #959749 31-Dec-2013 22:29
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joker97: They should really stop the bus service. The emissions definitely cause cancer. Kids should walk and risk gunshots, those definitely do not cause cancer.


They might be at risk of getting run over, but gunshots??

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  #959758 31-Dec-2013 23:38
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Goosey: This guy is local from NZ and had completed a huge amount of research piror to his death.
Experts say that if he was still alive… the theory would have been proven and published by now…

http://www.neilcherry.com



From that page:

"The widespread and massively growing rate of usage of mobile phones around the world is leading to having over a billion people using their phones most days. Initially we had bag phones and car phones, over 10 years ago we moved to portable handsets which originally were analogue phones and now most of the phones are digital. With the phone held against the ear the exposure of the head to modulated or digitally pulsed microwaves from the antenna, is very high. The head is a very sensitive bioelectromagnetic organ. Therefore resonance absorption and electrical interference are classical biophysics mechanisms. Cherry (2002) shows that natural electromagnetic radiation, the Schumann Resonance signal, when it is modulated by Solar Activity, is associated with modulation of human health effects, including cancer, cardiac, reproductive and neurological diseases and mortality. The study also shows that similar elevated health effects are found in electrical workers and physiotherapists exposed to short wave and microwaves. Since the cellphone radiation exposes the user?s body to about a million times higher and the head to about a billion times higher exposure than the mean Schumann resonance signal, it is scientifically plausible that the same effects will be found from exposure to cellphone radiation. This review confirms that scientific studies show all these effects from exposure to cellphone radiation. It is therefore scientifically plausible that these health effects will be found in populations living within the vicinity of cellphone sites and from using cellphones."

It's a review, not a study. 

From another blurb: 

"Dr Cherry was asked by a school in Florida, United States, to review the biological and epidemiological health effects of electromagnetic fields, especially for children. It was proposed that a substation be constructed next to the school with high-voltage powerlines coming in. This review shows that there are many studies showing that extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields reduce melatonin, enhance chromosome aberrations, damage DNA strands and increase rates of cancer in electrical and electronic workers, and children and adults in residential situations, both from powerlines and from the fields in their own homes. "

Another review, not a study.

To me it sounds like these papers were written to fit something they already had in mind. In the second case I'd say the school asked for a signed paper giving them basis to protest (NIMBY) the installation of the substation. It doesn't look like the school asked to find if there are effects, but to find papers that supported their views.









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  #959760 31-Dec-2013 23:56
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Although it is impossible to prove that WiFi doesn't increase the risk of cancer, the relative risk of brain cancer in humans given that you have been exposed to WiFi appears to be very close to 1.0 (i.e., at most only slightly increases/decreases cancer risk). Of course, given these results are based upon observational studies in humans and treatment studies in animals care is needed in interpretation. It isn't easy randomly assigning hundreds of thousands of children to control and 'treatment' groups where they receive different doses of WiFi radiation over several years and then compare their cancer incidence over the next 20 years.

What these parents need to realise is that brain cancer in children is relatively common, with an annual incidence around 3 per 100,000 children. Many children who develop cancer will have used WiFi devices but looking at all the cases of children who use WiFi and don't develop cancer shows that they are likely independent events. The combination of genes that the child gets from the parents plays a far greater role in the risk of the child developing brain cancer but it is much more satisfying to certain people to place blame on something life WiFi rather than the random combination of genes the child got from you.

I wish people would focus their energy of things that actually have reasonable scientific evidence of influencing morbidity and mortality of children (vaccinations, sunburn, obesity, smoke exposure, prenatal alcohol and drug exposure, ...).

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  #959777 1-Jan-2014 01:53
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Manawatu :)




#include <standard.disclaimer>


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  #959786 1-Jan-2014 08:33
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Too much wifi and you'll end up looking like this guy.


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  #959789 1-Jan-2014 08:48
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zenourn: things that actually have reasonable scientific evidence of influencing morbidity and mortality of children (vaccinations, sunburn, obesity, smoke exposure, prenatal alcohol and drug exposure, ...).


Wait a minute ... what did you just say? That unnatural poisonous western sun trick will kill faster than you can say Wi-Fi! How dare you ...




Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


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