Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 

gzt

10862 posts

Uber Geek


  # 999291 5-Mar-2014 10:22
Send private message

Klipspringer: We have some radio stations here in NZ which are essentially owned by the community. These radio stations, Life FM for example, rely totally on funding from the community to be able to broadcast. Whats the story here?

They pay record companies just like everyone else. Unless there is a Christian Copyright similar to BSD/GPL or something?

3095 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 999963 6-Mar-2014 09:09
Send private message

Klipspringer: Thanks to everyone for contributing to this thread ....

The double dipping thing really annoys me. The stories about jukeboxes and Radio stations (station pays, listener also pays)...

Going back to the radio though. We have some radio stations here in NZ which are essentially owned by the community. These radio stations, Life FM for example, rely totally on funding from the community to be able to broadcast. Whats the story here?


Kiwirock answered this already

kiwirock: 
To also keep the argument balanced on the fence post, the likes of LPFM stations who aren't really in it for commercial gain, they pay $250 a year to each, but limited to $10,000 revenue to re-coup costs (so in other words the 2.5% of revenue target again). No record keeping has been requested to be handed in, yet, so they're pretty lenient in my eyes.

So a fee less than $250 a year would be okay for a company turning more than $10k a year based on those rates considering you probably have more foot traffic than listeners to an LPFM station.

 
 
 
 


gzt

10862 posts

Uber Geek


  # 999996 6-Mar-2014 09:53
Send private message

Life FM is a major nationwide christian contemporary music network. Definitely not low power ; ).

I don't know what the structure is but at least part of costs are supported by fundraising.

To my knowledge there is no exemption from copyright on religious non-profit grounds, but I have not checked the the act. I mean otherwise you could set up a non-profit religious radio station and profit enjoy the proceeds heartily. Btw, a fair number of churches in USA pay copyright fees for sermons and music.

8105 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 1000086 6-Mar-2014 12:30
Send private message

gzt: Life FM is a major nationwide christian contemporary music network. Definitely not low power ; ).

I don't know what the structure is but at least part of costs are supported by fundraising.

To my knowledge there is no exemption from copyright on religious non-profit grounds, but I have not checked the the act. I mean otherwise you could set up a non-profit religious radio station and profit enjoy the proceeds heartily. Btw, a fair number of churches in USA pay copyright fees for sermons and music.


They do for music in churches in NZ as well..




Regards,

Old3eyes


634 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 1000294 6-Mar-2014 18:04
Send private message

gzt: Life FM is a major nationwide christian contemporary music network. Definitely not low power ; ).

I don't know what the structure is but at least part of costs are supported by fundraising.

To my knowledge there is no exemption from copyright on religious non-profit grounds, but I have not checked the the act. I mean otherwise you could set up a non-profit religious radio station and profit enjoy the proceeds heartily. Btw, a fair number of churches in USA pay copyright fees for sermons and music.


They will be paying based on turnover. They more they make the more they pay. It used to be 2.5% but if I recall correctly the last license for broadcast I saw was going to up 3-4% over a few years. So it's probably higher than 2.5% now.

The last community one I worked for didn't have to file reports and had to pay a blanket fee of around $3,000 or something annually as it's income was pretty fixed (NZ On-Air funded).

The last charity trust one I worked for still paid 2.5% of the years turnover as it's operating costs were still in the $xx,000's of dollars and varied as it sold advertising to sponsor it's costs rather than receive funding. The same as a normal broadcaster would.



509 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


  # 1000321 6-Mar-2014 18:46
Send private message

I would have thought that Hymns would be the same as classical music, old and hence outside of the usually deceased owners copyright.
A couple of friends of mine own retail outlets, they thought I was joking when I told them about this. They run smallish businesses with a turnover of 100K or less. They would simply remove the radio station as opposed to paying $270/annum.
One of them sells services B2B and advertises on radio to other businesses, he felt it was double dipping to charge business owners to receive a radio station that effectively charges businesses to receive his radio ads.
I think as more people become aware of this opposition will grow.
We live in a country where it's always been 'free' as in beer to listen to the radio. When I get a haircut I'm paying for the haircut, not the jokes the barber tells me, the radio in the background or the birds tweeting. The big loosers will be the radio stations in the above case because advertisers are not going to continue to advertise to businesses if they have to pay money to hear the adds in their normal business environment. 


8105 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 1000331 6-Mar-2014 19:09
Send private message

turnin: I would have thought that Hymns would be the same as classical music, old and hence outside of the usually deceased owners copyright.



They are but most churches use modern music written in the past 40 years so they are still in copyright..




Regards,

Old3eyes


 
 
 
 


509 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


  # 1000333 6-Mar-2014 19:12
Send private message

Oh, ok, been a while :)

634 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 1000334 6-Mar-2014 19:13
Send private message

turnin: I would have thought that Hymns would be the same as classical music, old and hence outside of the usually deceased owners copyright.
A couple of friends of mine own retail outlets, they thought I was joking when I told them about this. They run smallish businesses with a turnover of 100K or less. They would simply remove the radio station as opposed to paying $270/annum.
One of them sells services B2B and advertises on radio to other businesses, he felt it was double dipping to charge business owners to receive a radio station that effectively charges businesses to receive his radio ads.
I think as more people become aware of this opposition will grow.
We live in a country where it's always been 'free' as in beer to listen to the radio. When I get a haircut I'm paying for the haircut, not the jokes the barber tells me, the radio in the background or the birds tweeting. The big loosers will be the radio stations in the above case because advertisers are not going to continue to advertise to businesses if they have to pay money to hear the adds in their normal business environment. 



It's not so much if they have to pay, it's whether they are paying, listening and your advertising is effective.

Pay TV like Sky was a mouthful to digest when it originally arrived. Then started playing ads between movies considering you were already paying for the service in the first place.

But advertisers don't stop advertising on Sky just because some don't pay to receive it either at home or at work because it's still effective, more so than radio ads. It's also copyright licensed similar, it's not for public commercial premises that's what Sky commercial is all about.

I know plenty who pay their fees and have the radio on in a normal business premises. But pulling radio advertising if effective in cars, homes, boats, buses, hotels etc... and business that do pay their fee which by comparison to buy a radio stations library of music to keep entertained is a small fee to pay.



634 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 1000342 6-Mar-2014 19:26
Send private message

turnin: I would have thought that Hymns would be the same as classical music, old and hence outside of the usually deceased owners copyright.
A couple of friends of mine own retail outlets, they thought I was joking when I told them about this. They run smallish businesses with a turnover of 100K or less. They would simply remove the radio station as opposed to paying $270/annum.
One of them sells services B2B and advertises on radio to other businesses, he felt it was double dipping to charge business owners to receive a radio station that effectively charges businesses to receive his radio ads.
I think as more people become aware of this opposition will grow.
We live in a country where it's always been 'free' as in beer to listen to the radio. When I get a haircut I'm paying for the haircut, not the jokes the barber tells me, the radio in the background or the birds tweeting. The big loosers will be the radio stations in the above case because advertisers are not going to continue to advertise to businesses if they have to pay money to hear the adds in their normal business environment. 



And I don't think the rules will ever change in a hurry in the future. Not unless radio stations sign deals with the record studios and song writers directly, and pay a much higher fee for rights to cover any other futher commercial use on the listeners behalf that could reflect a drop in more direct record sales.

That would wipe out radio, because it would mean the of advertising would go through the roof to re-coupe costs.

Then you're starting to look at the real picture of what it costs. Like broadband, we don't pay what it really costs to provide the advertised speed around the clock, only a portion assuming the next Joe Bloggs won't be using it at the same time.

In broadcasting, they're assuming the next person is using the copyright assets of a song writer/record label for personal use not licensing it for further commercial use.

I'm all for no further costs to end listeners, but not if the cost of licensing continues to rise on radios side, because ultimately that cost is still going to get passed back on to you, the advertiser. Unless you want rights taken away from the owner of the copyrighted material by law. Then everyone will want licenses and patents everywhere changed as well and expect a free lunch.

509 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


  # 1000348 6-Mar-2014 19:53
Send private message

kiwirock:
turnin: ....ear the adds in their normal business environment. 



It's not so much if they have to pay, it's whether they are paying, listening and your advertising is effective.

Pay TV like Sky was a mouthful to digest when it originally arrived. Then started playing ads between movies considering you were already paying for the service in the first place.

But advertisers don't stop advertising on Sky just because some don't pay to receive it either at home or at work because it's still effective, more so than radio ads. It's also copyright licensed similar, it's not for public commercial premises that's what Sky commercial is all about.

I know plenty who pay their fees and have the radio on in a normal business premises. But pulling radio advertising if effective in cars, homes, boats, buses, hotels etc... and business that do pay their fee which by comparison to buy a radio stations library of music to keep entertained is a small fee to pay.




Sky wasn't ever a free service like radio is today, if sky was free for 50 years, then started charging they would have a much harder job to do in selling the service. Obviously people don't like to have fees imposed on them for a service that was formerly free. whether it be plastic bags in supermarkets or toilet paper in toilets. I think the model will cause more grief than it will return money to musicians.
Free propagates pretty well- propagation can be a very effective business model. The music industry would have been better to build commercial messages/value into music , as some have, and then encourage the end user to engage with the musician or sponsoring company via technology as opposed to inventing new charges. Anyway, call me a stickler but no way in the world will I pay to have the radio on in the background.    

781 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 1000485 7-Mar-2014 08:01
Send private message

Onemusic also lay claim to music in movie trailers. As a DVD rental shop, We have commercial arrangements with movie studios to display their trailers whom own the rights to all content within the movie trailer (if they didn't then the movie companies would be breaching copyright? Correct?).

Seems like a huge stretch to me to require a license.

Also, a few years ago, apra was out there selling themselves as "the" license you needed in retail and the cost was pretty small (under $100 for my size shop), now that cost is over $400. At under $100, I objected to it given we don't play music, just movie trailers, but paid up, at over $400, I don't think so Tim.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Industry plan could create a billion dollar interactive games sector
Posted 19-Aug-2019 20:41


Personal cyber insurance a New Zealand first
Posted 19-Aug-2019 20:26


University of Waikato launches space for esports
Posted 19-Aug-2019 20:20


D-Link ANZ expands mydlink ecosystem with new mydlink Mini Wi-Fi Smart Plug
Posted 19-Aug-2019 20:14


Kiwi workers still falling victim to old cyber tricks
Posted 12-Aug-2019 20:47


Lightning Lab GovTech launches 2019 programme
Posted 12-Aug-2019 20:41


Epson launches portable laser projector
Posted 12-Aug-2019 20:27


Huawei launches new distributed HarmonyOS
Posted 12-Aug-2019 20:20


Lenovo introduces single-socket servers for edge and data-intensive workloads
Posted 9-Aug-2019 21:26


The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.3
Posted 9-Aug-2019 16:57


Symantec sell enterprise security assets for US$ 10.7 billion to Broadcom
Posted 9-Aug-2019 16:43


Artificial tongue can distinguish whisky and identify counterfeits
Posted 8-Aug-2019 20:20


Toyota and Preferred Networks to develop service robots
Posted 8-Aug-2019 20:11


Vodafone introduces new Vodafone TV device
Posted 7-Aug-2019 17:16


Intel announces next-generation Intel Xeon Scalable processors with up to 56 cores
Posted 7-Aug-2019 15:41



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.