Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | ... | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16
4321 posts

Uber Geek


  # 997262 1-Mar-2014 20:12
Send private message

garbonzai: 
And at our current top speed of 40,000 kph, I don't know the maths exactly, but it takes thousands of years at 40k to one light year.



We originated in the big bang. 

During the big bang, space itself expanded faster than the speed of light.  This is why the further you look, the closer you get to viewing the big bang itself.  So, we must have traveled faster than the speed of light during the big bang. 

So, of course you can travel faster than the speed of light as this has occurred previously. 

At least , travel but not in the conventional way. You'd have to use the same physics that allowed space to expand so quickly. 



3407 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 997268 1-Mar-2014 20:25
Send private message

garbonzai: until someone named Scotty invents the Warp Drive, it's all theory, what's in our mind and what we choose to believe.

"Scotty" may be a little closer than we think if the reports on sites such as thisthis and this are anything to be believed.

 
 
 
 




17345 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 997309 1-Mar-2014 20:54
Send private message

surfisup1000:
garbonzai: 
And at our current top speed of 40,000 kph, I don't know the maths exactly, but it takes thousands of years at 40k to one light year.



We originated in the big bang. 

During the big bang, space itself expanded faster than the speed of light.  This is why the further you look, the closer you get to viewing the big bang itself.  So, we must have traveled faster than the speed of light during the big bang. 

So, of course you can travel faster than the speed of light as this has occurred previously. 

At least , travel but not in the conventional way. You'd have to use the same physics that allowed space to expand so quickly. 



I was thinking that today. The speed of light is currently max speed. If you traveled faster, the you will be invisible. As your "being" exists when light from you has not yet arrived

AS i understand from the many docos I have watched, the speed of light is the fastest we can go. Cannot recall the number but expansion of the universe is slower. 100,000 mph? So, if the Universe was created 13.7 billion years ago, and we are here now, 13.7 billion years later, how can we look into the stars back in time? As that light from 13.7 b or less, has already passed us?



17345 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 997310 1-Mar-2014 20:56
Send private message

surfisup1000:
garbonzai: 
And at our current top speed of 40,000 kph, I don't know the maths exactly, but it takes thousands of years at 40k to one light year.



We originated in the big bang. 

During the big bang, space itself expanded faster than the speed of light.  This is why the further you look, the closer you get to viewing the big bang itself.  So, we must have traveled faster than the speed of light during the big bang. 

So, of course you can travel faster than the speed of light as this has occurred previously. 

At least , travel but not in the conventional way. You'd have to use the same physics that allowed space to expand so quickly. 




I sorta agree, as what you say, and not what I say means we can look at light that is just arriving now from the Big Bang. BUT, everything I have read / learnt, is that light speed is max speed

Mad Scientist
20661 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 997317 1-Mar-2014 21:11
Send private message

you can't see the light from the big bang dude :D
data for big bang is extrapolated
like virus to brains .. oops what did I just say ... forget that !




Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.




17345 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 997322 1-Mar-2014 21:27
Send private message

joker97: you can't see the light from the big bang dude :D
data for big bang is extrapolated
like virus to brains .. oops what did I just say ... forget that !


Yep, confusing. I had seen that our telescopes in space are just a few hundred million years from the big bang. I follow light years and looking at light that just got here from thousands of light years away, but did we get here before the Big Bang light did? ??? Ill email Amy Mainzer! I want to know!

Mad Scientist
20661 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 997323 1-Mar-2014 21:43
Send private message

you can't see the light from the big bang. we have no idea where the centre is/was. which direction do you look? it is all an extrapolation from data of the expansion of space-time.




Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


 
 
 
 


1369 posts

Uber Geek


  # 997328 1-Mar-2014 22:21
Send private message

tdgeek:
gzt:
Klipspringer: ...Why is the earth organized chaos? Why did the big bang explode in such a way that it formed a perfect little earth, in a perfect place, with perfect beauty?

We are a part of that creation and created from the same patterns. It is not surprising we should find this beautiful. Thinking of the big bang as an explosion is kind of misleading because there was not any space to explode into at that time. Nor was there even any time.


Hard to comprehend "no time" 

I understand there wasn't time before the beginning of the universe as far as I am aware - space and time only exist within the universe - it is relative remember.  Before the universe there was (in theory) no space, so no time either.  That kind of means there wasn't a 2 minutes before.

This of course implies that there wasn't any life before the universe either - so we at least know there was a point at which time the total life in the universe was probably zero.





Software Engineer

 


262 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 997330 1-Mar-2014 22:29
Send private message

tdgeek:
surfisup1000:
garbonzai: 
And at our current top speed of 40,000 kph, I don't know the maths exactly, but it takes thousands of years at 40k to one light year.



We originated in the big bang. 

During the big bang, space itself expanded faster than the speed of light.  This is why the further you look, the closer you get to viewing the big bang itself.  So, we must have traveled faster than the speed of light during the big bang. 

So, of course you can travel faster than the speed of light as this has occurred previously. 

At least , travel but not in the conventional way. You'd have to use the same physics that allowed space to expand so quickly. 




I sorta agree, as what you say, and not what I say means we can look at light that is just arriving now from the Big Bang. BUT, everything I have read / learnt, is that light speed is max speed



Everything is a theory, we don't know speed of light is constant, if a black hole can bend  light (in theory) then it's possible to speed up or slow down light through gravitational pull/push, exspansion/contraction maybe by vast amounts, we simply don't know.

In the "big bang" theory, the split second into the expansion, atomized objects and light could have expanded millions or billions of times faster than light speed, who knows.

A solid object could go faster than light if enough force/gravitational push-pull/expansion was on that object.

Up until the steam engine a human had never gone faster than 40mph (on the back of a horse) unless they jumped off a cliff.

I personal think that physics that has brought us our great leaps in technology the last 100-200 years is great, but to move forward, there must be something fundamentally different that we do not yet know.

:P






Desktop AMD Ryzen 1600/RX-580/24GB Ram/29" UHD monitor, 1 laptop, Galaxy S7, Huawei something, raspberry PI, Sony Android TV plus other gadgets..... and puss (cat)

 

 

 

 

 

 


2385 posts

Uber Geek
Inactive user


  # 997339 1-Mar-2014 23:18
Send private message

TwoSeven:
tdgeek:
gzt:
Klipspringer: ...Why is the earth organized chaos? Why did the big bang explode in such a way that it formed a perfect little earth, in a perfect place, with perfect beauty?

We are a part of that creation and created from the same patterns. It is not surprising we should find this beautiful. Thinking of the big bang as an explosion is kind of misleading because there was not any space to explode into at that time. Nor was there even any time.


Hard to comprehend "no time" 

I understand there wasn't time before the beginning of the universe as far as I am aware - space and time only exist within the universe - it is relative remember.  Before the universe there was (in theory) no space, so no time either.  That kind of means there wasn't a 2 minutes before.

This of course implies that there wasn't any life before the universe either - so we at least know there was a point at which time the total life in the universe was probably zero.



Time is not a physical thing. It exists only when we observe something. In this case the big bang. If for instance you were observing it happen time in this sense existed. Therefore what happened a moment before?

As time is not physical. How could the big bangbang have possibly produce it?



Time is finite or infinite? IMO its infinite

8466 posts

Uber Geek


  # 997351 1-Mar-2014 23:27
Send private message

joker97: you can't see the light from the big bang dude :D


While you can't see the light from the big bang , the (now red-shifted) light from shortly after (a few hundred thousand years) the big bang is visible as the cosmic microwave background radiation.
It can't be seen from before that time because photons interacted with free charged particles in the hot plasma, only when the plasma cooled and hydrogen atoms formed could photons propagate.
The existence and nature of the CMBR is strong evidence for the inflationary big bang theory .



4321 posts

Uber Geek


  # 997358 1-Mar-2014 23:45
Send private message

My point is that the universe expanded faster than the speed of light  -- but it was space expanding as opposed to actual speed as we know it. Maybe the same physics behind expansion can one day be harnessed to travel faster than light. 

Hopefully they discover this before all the atoms in the universe fly apart due to the accelerating space-time expansion. 



JWR

762 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 997398 2-Mar-2014 03:54

garbonzai:
tdgeek:
surfisup1000:
garbonzai: 
And at our current top speed of 40,000 kph, I don't know the maths exactly, but it takes thousands of years at 40k to one light year.



We originated in the big bang. 

During the big bang, space itself expanded faster than the speed of light.  This is why the further you look, the closer you get to viewing the big bang itself.  So, we must have traveled faster than the speed of light during the big bang. 

So, of course you can travel faster than the speed of light as this has occurred previously. 

At least , travel but not in the conventional way. You'd have to use the same physics that allowed space to expand so quickly. 




I sorta agree, as what you say, and not what I say means we can look at light that is just arriving now from the Big Bang. BUT, everything I have read / learnt, is that light speed is max speed



Everything is a theory, we don't know speed of light is constant, if a black hole can bend  light (in theory) then it's possible to speed up or slow down light through gravitational pull/push, exspansion/contraction maybe by vast amounts, we simply don't know.

In the "big bang" theory, the split second into the expansion, atomized objects and light could have expanded millions or billions of times faster than light speed, who knows.

A solid object could go faster than light if enough force/gravitational push-pull/expansion was on that object.

Up until the steam engine a human had never gone faster than 40mph (on the back of a horse) unless they jumped off a cliff.

I personal think that physics that has brought us our great leaps in technology the last 100-200 years is great, but to move forward, there must be something fundamentally different that we do not yet know.

:P





'Everything' isn't a theory.

Actually, a scientific theory is a lot stronger than just someone's thoughts.

To be called a theory.. it has to backed up by experiment.

Until then, it's just a hypothesis or speculation.

JWR

762 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 997400 2-Mar-2014 04:09

Fred99:
joker97: you can't see the light from the big bang dude :D


While you can't see the light from the big bang , the (now red-shifted) light from shortly after (a few hundred thousand years) the big bang is visible as the cosmic microwave background radiation.
It can't be seen from before that time because photons interacted with free charged particles in the hot plasma, only when the plasma cooled and hydrogen atoms formed could photons propagate.
The existence and nature of the CMBR is strong evidence for the inflationary big bang theory .




Yes!

One of the greatest discoveries!

1828 posts

Uber Geek
Inactive user


  # 997403 2-Mar-2014 06:30
Send private message

Fred99:
KiwiNZ: A problem we have is we only know the very distant past of the universe and a very small snap shot of it, we have no real idea of the present except in our little piece of it, and that is a very small number. So assumptions and calculations are done based on events billions of years ago and trying to fit them into our model. However the reality is the Universe may well be very different to what we now believe.  So to look for life in other places in the present is looking back, way back in time. That gives so much scope for so much to be very wrong.




In terms of looking for evidence of life in other places, looking in our Milky Way galaxy would be a sensible place to start.
And it that case, despite the scale being immense - it's actually a pretty small spot in the universe.  The galaxy is only 120,000 ly or so.  120,000 years is tiny fraction of the period of time that life has existed on Earth.
Within our galaxy there would appear to be over 10 billion candidate stars with "goldilocks zone" planetary systems.
Many are much closer than ~100,000 ly.
Remote sensing for evidence may be difficult - but look how far we've got in the past few decades.


please don't confuse Light years with normal years they're two completely different beasts a light year is the distance travelled by light in a vacuum for one earth year  

1 Light Year = 9,460,536,000,000 km so bloody long way or 1135264320000000000 Km across and you'd need to be doing light speed just to make it across in 120000yrs 

So unless we can figure out a way to travel many times the speed of light your children's children's children's children's children will most likely still only be able to make it to the edge of our solar system 

1 | ... | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Intel expands 10th Gen Intel Core Mobile processor family
Posted 23-Aug-2019 10:22


Digital innovation drives new investment provider
Posted 23-Aug-2019 08:29


Catalyst Cloud becomes a Kubernetes Certified Service Provider (KCSP)
Posted 23-Aug-2019 08:21


New AI legaltech product launched in New Zealand
Posted 21-Aug-2019 17:01


Yubico launches first Lightning-compatible security key, the YubiKey 5Ci
Posted 21-Aug-2019 16:46


Disney+ streaming service confirmed launch in New Zealand
Posted 20-Aug-2019 09:29


Industry plan could create a billion dollar interactive games sector
Posted 19-Aug-2019 20:41


Personal cyber insurance a New Zealand first
Posted 19-Aug-2019 20:26


University of Waikato launches space for esports
Posted 19-Aug-2019 20:20


D-Link ANZ expands mydlink ecosystem with new mydlink Mini Wi-Fi Smart Plug
Posted 19-Aug-2019 20:14


Kiwi workers still falling victim to old cyber tricks
Posted 12-Aug-2019 20:47


Lightning Lab GovTech launches 2019 programme
Posted 12-Aug-2019 20:41


Epson launches portable laser projector
Posted 12-Aug-2019 20:27


Huawei launches new distributed HarmonyOS
Posted 12-Aug-2019 20:20


Lenovo introduces single-socket servers for edge and data-intensive workloads
Posted 9-Aug-2019 21:26



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.