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  Reply # 1043890 14-May-2014 15:08
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ajobbins:
geekiegeek: what is the definition of the 1% in NZ, considering the fact that we only have 3 billionaires.

I'd also love for someone to point out to me who exactly "John Keys rich mates" are. I'm guessing that the greens idea of who is rich is probably different from that of Labour and different again from that of National. 


Ummm.. the definition is the 1%. The top one percent of wealth holders.


or to put it another way, the top 1% of investors




Mike
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 It's our only home, lets clean it up then...

 

Take My Advice, Pull Down Your Pants And Slide On The Ice!

 

 


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  Reply # 1044866 14-May-2014 15:22
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KiwiNZ: 
You start a job, you may have to buy some clothes and a bus ticket, or parking permit and go to work 5 days a week. If you start a business you may have borrowed extensively against your home and other property etc etc and then to make that start up work your hours are not 9 to 5  with an hour for lunch but 7 to 11 with the luxury of maybe a 10am start over the pseudo weekend.

When financial and trading climates are hard the work of senior executives is considerably harder and the hours considerably longer, (something I have watched with my wife), if they keep a company trading etc through those times then they deserve the income they receive.


Sure, there is an element of this. But the policies the government put in place don't target the small business owners who might have large borrowings against personal assets. They usually target the big players, often foreign, who are only 'risking' shareholders money, not their own. And I can tell you from experience while many of then do work hard and long hours, so do a good chunk of their workers. 

The 9-5 Monday to Friday with an hour for lunch died a long time ago. I work for a global company, I often have conference calls with colleagues and/or clients in our offices around the globe at all hours of the day and night (as well as being in the office at least 8+ hours a day Mon-Fri), I have a BlackBerry that never stops making noise, and if I didn't respond to emails out of hours I would likely be deemed a 'poor performer' and 'not a team player'. It's become the norm and it's expected. I have worked weekends when projects have demanded it.




Twitter: ajobbins


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1044867 14-May-2014 15:24
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KiwiNZ: or to put it another way, the top 1% of investors


No, the top 1% of all wealth holders (Everyone). Everyone has some amount of wealth (even if that number is negative).




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  Reply # 1044870 14-May-2014 15:26
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ajobbins:
KiwiNZ: 
You start a job, you may have to buy some clothes and a bus ticket, or parking permit and go to work 5 days a week. If you start a business you may have borrowed extensively against your home and other property etc etc and then to make that start up work your hours are not 9 to 5  with an hour for lunch but 7 to 11 with the luxury of maybe a 10am start over the pseudo weekend.

When financial and trading climates are hard the work of senior executives is considerably harder and the hours considerably longer, (something I have watched with my wife), if they keep a company trading etc through those times then they deserve the income they receive.


Sure, there is an element of this. But the policies the government put in place don't target the small business owners who might have large borrowings against personal assets. They usually target the big players, often foreign, who are only 'risking' shareholders money, not their own. And I can tell you from experience while many of then do work hard and long hours, so do a good chunk of their workers. 

The 9-5 Monday to Friday with an hour for lunch died a long time ago. I work for a global company, I often have conference calls with colleagues and/or clients in our offices around the globe at all hours of the day and night (as well as being in the office at least 8+ hours a day Mon-Fri), I have a BlackBerry that never stops making noise, and if I didn't respond to emails out of hours I would likely be deemed a 'poor performer' and 'not a team player'. It's become the norm and it's expected. I have worked weekends when projects have demanded it.


What's a blackberry?

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  Reply # 1044872 14-May-2014 15:27
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ajobbins:
KiwiNZ: or to put it another way, the top 1% of investors


No, the top 1% of all wealth holders (Everyone). Everyone has some amount of wealth (even if that number is negative).


And that wealth is invested, if it were not invested it not be wealth for long, so my point is valid.




Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 It's our only home, lets clean it up then...

 

Take My Advice, Pull Down Your Pants And Slide On The Ice!

 

 


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  Reply # 1044873 14-May-2014 15:28
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dafman:
ajobbins:
KiwiNZ: 
You start a job, you may have to buy some clothes and a bus ticket, or parking permit and go to work 5 days a week. If you start a business you may have borrowed extensively against your home and other property etc etc and then to make that start up work your hours are not 9 to 5  with an hour for lunch but 7 to 11 with the luxury of maybe a 10am start over the pseudo weekend.

When financial and trading climates are hard the work of senior executives is considerably harder and the hours considerably longer, (something I have watched with my wife), if they keep a company trading etc through those times then they deserve the income they receive.


Sure, there is an element of this. But the policies the government put in place don't target the small business owners who might have large borrowings against personal assets. They usually target the big players, often foreign, who are only 'risking' shareholders money, not their own. And I can tell you from experience while many of then do work hard and long hours, so do a good chunk of their workers. 

The 9-5 Monday to Friday with an hour for lunch died a long time ago. I work for a global company, I often have conference calls with colleagues and/or clients in our offices around the globe at all hours of the day and night (as well as being in the office at least 8+ hours a day Mon-Fri), I have a BlackBerry that never stops making noise, and if I didn't respond to emails out of hours I would likely be deemed a 'poor performer' and 'not a team player'. It's become the norm and it's expected. I have worked weekends when projects have demanded it.


What's a blackberry?


A Frisbee :P




Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 It's our only home, lets clean it up then...

 

Take My Advice, Pull Down Your Pants And Slide On The Ice!

 

 


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  Reply # 1044876 14-May-2014 15:32
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KiwiNZ: 

There is also the other aspect the higher up the chain the greater risk exposure.


In absolute terms, yes. Proportionately, no. If I only have $20, and you take $5, I'm 25% down. If I have $100 billion, and I lose a billion, well... I don't about you but I'd be happy to be sitting on $99 billion.




iPad Air + iPhone SE + 2degrees 4tw!

These comments are my own and do not represent the opinions of 2degrees.


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  Reply # 1044881 14-May-2014 15:51
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Fred99:
And proud of it.


Welcome, fellow bottom-left-hand-corner-dweller -  I now have company in this sector!

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  Reply # 1044890 14-May-2014 16:07
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KiwiNZ:

I have been to the Coromandel the giant hole in the ground is about as an attractive tourist site that a City landfill would make.


I'm not saying it's a tourist attraction, although I'm sure some tourists would go and have a look. 

You can explore the Coromandel Peninsula for weeks, visit dozens of beautiful scenic places, undertake lots of interesting activities and never have to go and look at Martha Hill - the one hill in thousands of hills on the Coromandel Peninsula that is actively mined.

There is ample room for both.  That's my point.








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  Reply # 1044899 14-May-2014 16:17
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I don't need a silly survey or chart to show where I stand. I am a Green Capitalist, I have strong Green/environmental values and beliefs, I also am a capitalist, I do not believe the two are exclusionary. Having sound strong environment policies is sound business and fiscal sense. Why on earth invest in the future of our Nation if you are going to destroy it by bad environmental management.

There are many things that NZ can invest in that do not harm our environment and we should be looking to invest in ventures that are ecologically sound and can help this tired old planet, new technologies etc and become a world leader in the field and not repeat the mistakes made elsewhere.

I believe in a robust welfare system that helps those that are unable to help themselves. I also believe in a fair system that does not punish those who take risks earn more and as a result help grow this nation. I believe that the tax system we currently have in NZ is better than most and is serving us well. I don't see a Millionaire as an evil person as I don't see a person on a Job Seeker Benefit as a  bludger .




Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 It's our only home, lets clean it up then...

 

Take My Advice, Pull Down Your Pants And Slide On The Ice!

 

 


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  Reply # 1044910 14-May-2014 16:33
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  Reply # 1044930 14-May-2014 16:51
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KiwiNZ:

There are many things that NZ can invest in that do not harm our environment and we should be looking to invest in ventures that are ecologically sound and can help this tired old planet, new technologies etc and become a world leader in the field and not repeat the mistakes made elsewhere.



NZ isn't going to develop the technology that saves the planet. 

We lack the critical mass and research investment to be more than a bit player in the general tech space, or clean tech and most of what we do develop tends to get shifted offshore.  A recent clean tech example is LanzaTech who have shifted their operations to the US.  More general examples could be Navman or Tait and of course Fisher and Paykel is gradually disappearing offshore too.

You need a compelling motivation to develop technology, and if it's physical equipment you need to be physically close to whoever you are developing it for.

Ag technologies strike me as a better fit.  Gallagher, Trutest, Hamilton Jet.  All innovative technology companies who have developed out of our rural sectors, all world leading, all still here.




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  Reply # 1044950 14-May-2014 17:14
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MikeAqua:
KiwiNZ:

There are many things that NZ can invest in that do not harm our environment and we should be looking to invest in ventures that are ecologically sound and can help this tired old planet, new technologies etc and become a world leader in the field and not repeat the mistakes made elsewhere.



NZ isn't going to develop the technology that saves the planet. 

We lack the critical mass and research investment to be more than a bit player in the general tech space, or clean tech and most of what we do develop tends to get shifted offshore.  A recent clean tech example is LanzaTech who have shifted their operations to the US.  More general examples could be Navman or Tait and of course Fisher and Paykel is gradually disappearing offshore too.

You need a compelling motivation to develop technology, and if it's physical equipment you need to be physically close to whoever you are developing it for.

Ag technologies strike me as a better fit.  Gallagher, Trutest, Hamilton Jet.  All innovative technology companies who have developed out of our rural sectors, all world leading, all still here.


Tait is setup as a trust so that it cannot be easily sold off overseas.

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  Reply # 1045013 14-May-2014 18:12
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SaltyNZ:
KiwiNZ: 

There is also the other aspect the higher up the chain the greater risk exposure.


In absolute terms, yes. Proportionately, no. If I only have $20, and you take $5, I'm 25% down. If I have $100 billion, and I lose a billion, well... I don't about you but I'd be happy to be sitting on $99 billion.


That depends. If I lost it due to changes in asset valuation, fair enough.

If it was taken as tax to fund the poor, then no, not happy.





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  Reply # 1045031 14-May-2014 18:44
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Geektastic:
SaltyNZ:
KiwiNZ: 

There is also the other aspect the higher up the chain the greater risk exposure.


In absolute terms, yes. Proportionately, no. If I only have $20, and you take $5, I'm 25% down. If I have $100 billion, and I lose a billion, well... I don't about you but I'd be happy to be sitting on $99 billion.


That depends. If I lost it due to changes in asset valuation, fair enough.

If it was taken as tax to fund the poor, then no, not happy.


Wow

I hope you never need help




Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 It's our only home, lets clean it up then...

 

Take My Advice, Pull Down Your Pants And Slide On The Ice!

 

 


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